Singapore Mulls Steps to Ratify Nuclear Security Pact

Global Security Newswire Staff
Add to Briefcase
Global Security Newswire Staff
May 28, 2014, 10:38 a.m.

Singa­pore is con­sid­er­ing up­dates to its laws that would en­able the coun­try to join a treaty on pro­tect­ing nuc­le­ar ma­ter­i­als from theft, Today re­ports.

The bill — in­tro­duced days be­fore Singa­pore is set to host the an­nu­al Shangri-La re­gion­al se­cur­ity for­um — would al­low the South­east Asi­an na­tion to join the Con­ven­tion on the Phys­ic­al Pro­tec­tion of Nuc­le­ar Ma­ter­i­al, as well as a 2005 amend­ment ex­pand­ing on the ori­gin­al pact, the news­pa­per re­por­ted on Tues­day. The ori­gin­al treaty sets stand­ards for se­cur­ing in­ter­na­tion­al ship­ments of ci­vil­ian nuc­le­ar ma­ter­i­al, while the 2005 up­date would ap­ply sim­il­ar meas­ures for the do­mest­ic use and trans­fer of non­mil­it­ary atom­ic sub­stances.

“We are small and densely pop­u­lated. Any nuc­le­ar or ra­di­olo­gic­al in­cid­ent would be a ma­jor dis­aster, per­haps an ex­ist­en­tial one,” Singa­pore Prime Min­is­ter Lee Hsien Loong said in March, when he an­nounced plans to bring Singa­pore in­to line with the atom­ic pacts.

“We are also an in­ter­na­tion­al hub — our eco­nomy, trade and se­cur­ity can eas­ily be af­fected by a nuc­le­ar ac­ci­dent else­where,” he ad­ded at the 2014 Nuc­le­ar Se­cur­ity Sum­mit in The Hag­ue, Neth­er­lands.

The meas­ure he pro­posed this week would amend Singa­pore’s Ra­di­ation Pro­tec­tion Act to out­law any use of atom­ic sub­stances to kill or in­jure a per­son, or to in­flict sig­ni­fic­ant harm to prop­erty.

It would also render il­leg­al any threat to steal nuc­le­ar ma­ter­i­al as a means of black­mail, ac­cord­ing to the news­pa­per. The le­gis­la­tion would per­mit ex­tra­di­tion of sus­pec­ted nuc­le­ar of­fend­ers, and en­able au­thor­it­ies to pro­sec­ute in­di­vidu­als for al­leged atom­ic vi­ol­a­tions car­ried out over­seas.

In ad­di­tion, the meas­ure would in­crease from two to five years the max­im­um pen­alty for il­leg­ally trans­fer­ring or hold­ing nuc­le­ar ma­ter­i­al.

The ori­gin­al phys­ic­al-pro­tec­tion treaty had 149 mem­ber na­tions as of Decem­ber. The amend­ment, which has yet to take ef­fect, as of last month had 75 mem­ber na­tions; the United States has yet to rat­i­fy the new­er pro­vi­sion.

What We're Following See More »
CITES CONFLICT OF INTEREST
Lieberman Withdraws from Consideration for FBI Job
2 days ago
THE LATEST
MINIMUM 2 PERCENT GDP
Trump Tells NATO Countries To Pay Up
2 days ago
BREAKING
MANAFORT AND FLYNN
Russians Discussed Influencing Trump Through Aides
2 days ago
THE DETAILS

"American spies collected information last summer revealing that senior Russian intelligence and political officials were discussing how to exert influence over Donald J. Trump through his advisers." The conversations centered around Paul Manafort, who was campaign chairman at the time, and Michael Flynn, former national security adviser and then a close campaign surrogate. Both men have been tied heavily with Russia and Flynn is currently at the center of the FBI investigation into possible collusion between the Trump campaign and Russia.

Source:
BUT WHITE HOUSE MAY USE AGAINST HIM ANYWAY
Ethics Cops Clear Mueller to Work on Trump Case
3 days ago
THE LATEST

"Former FBI Director Robert Mueller has been cleared by U.S. Department of Justice ethics experts to oversee an investigation into possible collusion between then-candidate Donald Trump's 2016 election campaign and Russia." Some had speculated that the White House would use "an ethics rule limiting government attorneys from investigating people their former law firm represented" to trip up Mueller's appointment. Jared Kushner is a client of Mueller's firm, WilmerHale. "Although Mueller has now been cleared by the Justice Department, the White House may still use his former law firm's connection to Manafort and Kushner to undermine the findings of his investigation, according to two sources close to the White House."

Source:
BUSINESSES CAN’T PLEAD FIFTH
Senate Intel to Subpoena Two of Flynn’s Businesses
3 days ago
THE LATEST

Senate Intelligence Committee chairman Richard Burr (R-NC) and ranking member Mark Warner (D-VA) will subpoena two businesses owned by former National Security Advisor Michael Flynn. Burr said, "We would like to hear from General Flynn. We'd like to see his documents. We'd like him to tell his story because he publicly said he had a story to tell."

×
×

Welcome to National Journal!

You are currently accessing National Journal from IP access. Please login to access this feature. If you have any questions, please contact your Dedicated Advisor.

Login