Slideshow

Thailand Coup: Bangkok Under Martial Law

May 22, 2014, 9 a.m.

As the Thai mil­it­ary de­clared mar­tial law, op­pos­i­tion pro­test­ers cel­eb­rate their takeover of the gov­ern­ment. The mil­it­ary has since sus­pen­ded the con­sti­tu­tion and ordered the dis­pers­al of rival protests both for and against the ous­ted former Prime Min­is­ter Thaksin Shinawatra. A curfew from 10 p.m. to 5 a.m. has also been im­posed. 

Thai anti-government protesters celebrate at their camp outside Government House after Thailand's army chief announced that the armed forces were seizing power, in Bangkok on May 22, 2014. Thailand's army chief announced in a televised address to the nation on May 22 that the armed forces were seizing power after months of deadly political turmoil. The commander-in-chief, who invoked martial law on May 22, said the coup was needed to prevent the conflict escalating.  AFP/Getty Images
Thai soldiers stand guard at a checkpoint near the pro-government ''Red shirts'' camp site on the outskirts of Bangkok on May 22, 2014. Thailand's military hosted ground-breaking talks on May 21 between warring political rivals after imposing martial law to prevent the deeply divided kingdom degenerating into another "Ukraine or Egypt".  AFP/Getty Images
Thai army chief General Prayut Chan-O-Cha gives a traditional greeting to delegates prior to a meeting at the Army Club in Bangkok on May 20, 2014. Thailand's army declared martial law after months of deadly anti-government protests, deploying armed troops in central Bangkok and censoring the media but insisting the move was "not a coup".  AFP/Getty Images
Yingluck Shinawatra (C) sits with members of Parliament as the Thai parliament officially elected her as the country's first female Prime Minister August 5, 2011 in Bangkok, Thailand. In the lower house, 296 of the legislature's 500 members voted for Yingluck. Three members voted against and 197 abstained.Thai's cast their ballots back on July 3, 2011. Yingluck Shinawatra, is the younger sister of fugitive former premier Thaksin Shinawatra, who was ousted in a 2006 coup. This is Thailand's 4th election on 7 years as the country continues on a bumpy road to democracy. National Journal
Thai anti-government protest leader Suthep Thaugsuban gestures as he addresses supporters at their main protest site near Government House in Bangkok on May 20, 2014. Thailand's opposition demonstrators vowed to keep up their campaign to topple the government, despite the imposition of martial law by the military to quell political violence.  AFP/Getty Images
Thai soldiers stand guard after army chief General Prayut Chan-O-Cha met with anti-government and pro-government leaders at the Army Club in Bangkok on May 22, 2014. Thailand's army chief announced in an address to the nation that the armed forces were seizing power after months of deadly political turmoil.  AFP/Getty Images
Thai anti-government protesters listen to leaders' speeches at their camp outside Government House after Thailand's army chief announced that the armed forces were seizing power, in Bangkok on May 22, 2014. Thailand's army chief seized power in a military coup on May 22, ordering rival protesters off the streets and deposing the government in a bid to end months of political bloodshed.  AFP/Getty Images
Thai soldiers stand guard after army chief General Prayut Chan-O-Cha met with anti-government and pro-government leaders at the Army Club in Bangkok on May 22, 2014. Thailand's army chief announced in an address to the nation that the armed forces were seizing power after months of deadly political turmoil.  AFP/Getty Images
Thai anti-government protesters celebrate at their camp outside Government House after Thailand's army chief announced that the armed forces were seizing power, in Bangkok on May 22, 2014. Thailand's army chief seized power in a military coup on May 22, ordering rival protesters off the streets and deposing the government in a bid to end months of political bloodshed.  AFP/Getty Images
BANGKOK, THAILAND - MAY 22: Thai army soldiers secure the grounds at the Royal Thai Army Club, the venue for peace talks between pro- and anti-government groups on May 22, 2014 in Bangkok, Thailand. The army chief announced in an address to the nation that the armed forces were seizing power amid reports that leaders of the opposing groups attending the talks were being detained by the military. Thailand has seen months of political unrest and violence which has claimed at least 28 lives.  Getty Images
BANGKOK, THAILAND - MAY 20: Passersby pose for a photo with Thai army soldiers standing guard on a city centre street after martial law was declared on May 20, 2014 in Bangkok, Thailand. The army imposed martial law across Thailand amid a deepening political crisis that has seen six months of protests and claimed at least 28 lives.  Getty Images
An anti-government protester waves national flags as leader Suthep Thaugsuban (not seen) delivers a speech to supporters at Democracy monument in Bangkok on May 22, 2014. Thailand's military hosted ground-breaking talks on May 21 between warring political rivals after imposing martial law to prevent the deeply divided kingdom degenerating into another "Ukraine or Egypt".  AFP/Getty Images
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