Slideshow

20 Photos of the 1965 Selma-to-Montgomery Marches

March 7 marks the 50th anniversary of the civil rights movement’s “Bloody Sunday.”

March 5, 2015, 9:46 a.m.

Dur­ing the first Selma-to-Mont­gomery march, 600 civil rights demon­strat­ors were at­tacked by loc­al and state po­lice. The at­tack bolstered sup­port for the move­ment, and the demon­stra­tions that fol­lowed even­tu­ally led to the Vot­ing Rights Act.

March 1965: American civil rights leader Martin Luther King (1929 - 1968) with his wife Coretta Scott King and colleagues during a civil rights march from Selma, Alabama, to the state capital in Montgomery. National Journal
March 1965: Civil rights campaigner Dr Martin Luther King (1929 - 1968) with his wife Coretta Scott King, at a black voting rights march from Selma, Alabama, to the state capital in Montgomery. National Journal
March 1965: American civil rights demonstrators, led by Dr Martin Luther King, approach the Capitol Building in Montgomery, Alabama, at the end of their march for black voting rights from Selma, Alabama. National Journal
March 1965: Passers-by watching a civil rights march from Selma, Alabama, to the state capital in Montgomery.  National Journal
March 1965: Participants in a black voting rights march in Alabama. Dr Martin Luther King led the march from Selma, Alabama, to the state capital in Montgomery. National Journal
March 1965: Children watching a black voting rights march in Alabama. Dr Martin Luther King led the march from Selma, Alabama, to the state capital in Montgomery. National Journal
March 1965: Four black women applauding while watching a civil rights march from Selma, Alabama, to the state capital in Montgomery.  National Journal
March 1965: Four white men watching a black voting rights march from Selma, Alabama, to the state capital in Montgomery.  National Journal
March 1965: Two protestors on a black voting rights march in Alabama. Dr Martin Luther King led the march from Selma, Alabama, to the state capital of Montgomery. National Journal
March 1965: Martin Luther King (1929 - 1968) leads the Alabama Civil Rights march, flanked by supporters. Next to him is fellow campaigner Ralph Abernathy (1926 - 1990). National Journal
This aerial view shows a half-mile-long column of civil rights demonstrators, led by Dr Martin Luther King, on March 21, 1965 in Selma, Alabama, as they cross the Edmund Pettus bridge, scene of recent confrontation between demonstrators and state troopers, on the third leg of the Selma to Montgomery marches. The Selma-to-Montgomery March for voting rights ended three weeks and represented the political and emotional peak of the modern civil rights movement. The first march took place on March 07, 1965 ('Bloody Sunday') when 600 civil rights marchers were attacked by state and local police.  National Journal
Civil rights leaders from all parts of the United States march to protest recent police brutality in Alabama, March 12, 1965 in Washington. National Journal
March 1965: A black woman is arrested by police in front of the White House, in demonstrations following the death of Reverend Reep from a beating he received from white men in Selma, Alabama.  National Journal
15,000 civil rights advocates rally outside the White House to protest recent racial violence in Alabama March 14, 1965.  National Journal
Civil rights advocates march in the Harlem section of New York to protest recent racial violence in Alabama March 16, 1965.  National Journal
25th March 1965: A large poster purporting to show Dr Martin Luther King at a Communist Training School stands beside the route of the Alabama civil rights march which he led. National Journal
Civil rights demonstrators, led by Dr Martin Luther King, pass by federal guards as they make their way from Selma to Montgomery on March 23, 1965 in Alabama, on the third leg of the Selma to Montgomery marches. The Selma-to-Montgomery March for voting rights ended three weeks and represented the political and emotional peak of the modern civil rights movement. The first march took place on March 07, 1965 ('Bloody Sunday') when 600 civil rights marchers were attacked by state and local police. National Journal
April 1965: Dr Martin Luther King (1929 - 1968) addresses civil rights marchers in Selma, Alabama. National Journal
30th March 1965: The Capitol Building in Montgomery, Alabama, is heavily guarded against protestors on the second black voting rights march from Selma, Alabama, organised by Martin Luther King.  National Journal
1st April 1965: Two Alabama state troopers standing over the road from the wreck of the car belonging to the murdered Detroit housewife, Viola Liuzzo, who was killed by a group of Ku Klux Klansmen (KKK) after having taken part in a civil rights march from Selma to Montgomery. National Journal
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