Are the Mideast Peace Talks on Life Support?

Secretary of State John Kerry said that discussions continue, but a surprise announcement underscores the uphill battle to reach an agreement.

John Kerry speaks at the American Israel Public Affairs Committee̢۪s (AIPAC) annual policy conference at the Walter E. Washington Convention Center in Washington, DC, May 5, 2009.
2009 AFP
Jordain Carney
April 1, 2014, 1:29 p.m.

The Middle East peace talks aren’t of­fi­cially dead, but a sur­prise move Tues­day has worsened its pro­gnos­is.

Sec­ret­ary of State John Kerry can­celed his Wed­nes­day trip to meet with Palestini­an Au­thor­ity Pres­id­ent Mah­moud Ab­bas, after the Palestini­an lead­er re­newed his bid for state­hood on Tues­day by sign­ing pa­per­work to join 15 in­ter­na­tion­al agen­cies.

U.S. and Is­raeli of­fi­cials have stressed that Palestini­ans shouldn’t use the agen­cies, and by­pass the U.S. fa­cil­it­ated talks, to gain state­hood. 

Ab­bas said at a sign­ing ce­re­mony Tues­day that he doesn’t want to “col­lide” with the United States, but that the de­cision was in re­sponse to Is­rael not re­leas­ing a fourth round of pris­on­ers as sched­uled. 

Kerry’s an­nounce­ment to re­port­ers in Brus­sels that the meet­ing had been called off marks a quick turn­around from re­ports earli­er Tues­day that a deal to ex­tend ne­go­ti­ations was likely to be an­nounced this week.

A seni­or State De­part­ment of­fi­cial told The Wash­ing­ton Post that the deal Kerry had planned to an­nounce would have in­cluded Palestini­ans agree­ing to not press for of­fi­cial state­hood through the United Na­tions. The deal would have also called for Is­rael to re­lease pris­on­ers and curb hous­ing con­struc­tion.

The Obama ad­min­is­tra­tion was also re­portedly con­sid­er­ing re­leas­ing Jonath­an Pol­lard, an Is­raeli spy cur­rently serving a life sen­tence, as part of the peace talks. 

Ab­bas’s de­cision is the latest bump in the per­petu­ally tur­bu­lent talks to re­solve the long-stand­ing is­sue. The two sides have un­til the end of April to reach a frame­work for mov­ing for­ward, and Kerry stressed that the pro­cess isn’t over.

“All I can tell you is that we are con­tinu­ing, even now as I am stand­ing up here speak­ing, to be en­gaged with both parties to find the best way for­ward,” he said.

What We're Following See More »
STAFF PICKS
What the Current Crop of Candidates Could Learn from JFK
1 days ago
WHY WE CARE

Much has been made of David Brooks’s recent New York Times column, in which confesses to missing already the civility and humanity of Barack Obama, compared to who might take his place. In NewYorker.com, Jeffrey Frank reminds us how critical such attributes are to foreign policy. “It’s hard to imagine Kennedy so casually referring to the leader of Russia as a gangster or a thug. For that matter, it’s hard to imagine any president comparing the Russian leader to Hitler [as] Hillary Clinton did at a private fund-raiser. … Kennedy, who always worried that miscalculation could lead to war, paid close attention to the language of diplomacy.”

Source:
STAFF PICKS
Maher Weighs in on Bernie, Trump and Palin
1 days ago
WHY WE CARE

“We haven’t seen a true leftist since FDR, so many millions are coming out of the woodwork to vote for Bernie Sanders; he is the Occupy movement now come to life in the political arena.” So says Bill Maher in his Hollywood Reporter cover story (more a stream-of-consciousness riff than an essay, actually). Conservative states may never vote for a socialist in the general election, but “this stuff has never been on the table, and these voters have never been activated.” Maher saves most of his bile for Donald Trump and Sarah Palin, writing that by nominating Palin as vice president “John McCain is the one who opened the Book of the Dead and let the monsters out.” And Trump is picking up where Palin left off.

Source:
×