Almanac A members-only database of searchable profiles compiled and adapted from the Almanac of American Politics

Biography

Elected: June 2003, 5th full term.

Born: December 24, 1949, Lubbock

Home: Lubbock

Education: TX Tech. U., B.B.A. 1972

Professional Career: Mgr., Sentry Property Mngt., 1972-75; Instructor, South Plains College, 1975-78; V.P., First National Bank, 1975-82; Pres., Prestige Homes, 1983-87; Pres., Lubbock Land Co., 1987-2003.

Ethnicity: White/Caucasian

Religion: Baptist

Family: married (Dana) , 2 children

Randy Neugebauer, a Republican who won his seat in a June 2003 special election, is one of the House’s staunchest conservatives. A former developer and banker, he has been an ardent critic of federal regulation as a senior member of the Financial Services Committee.

Neugebauer (NAW-ga-bower) graduated from Texas Tech, became a banker, and then ran his own land development company, which has made him one of the wealthiest members of Texas’ delegation. From 1992 to 1998, he was a Lubbock city councilman. His chance for a House seat was prompted by the unexpected resignation, announced a week after the November 2002 election, of Republican Rep.Larry Combest. In the all-party primary, the four leading contenders to succeed Combest were all Republicans. They were Mike Conaway, a Midland accountant, plus three candidates from Lubbock: Neugebauer, state Rep. Carl Isett, and former Lubbock Mayor David Langston. Neugebauer was the biggest spender and emphasized his positions on national defense and his business connections to oil and farming. He finished first, with 821 more votes than Conaway. The runoff featured few differences on the issues, and Neugebauer won 51%-49%. (Conaway won the neighboring 11th District seat in 2004.)

He barely had a chance to get settled in before the Texas Legislature drew up a new plan for congressional districts in October 2003. The new lines placed the home of 13-term Democratic Rep.Charlie Stenholm in the new 13th District, but that district was almost entirely unfamiliar territory for him and heavily Republican to boot, so Stenholm decided to run in the 19th against Neugebauer. Stenholm was the last conservative Democrat from Texas in the House, one of only five Democrats who voted to impeach President Bill Clinton in 1998.

In the 2004 showdown, mostof the advantages—the district’s partisan tilt, the fact that Neugebauer had represented 58% of its residents and Stenholm only 31%—favored the Republican. Both candidates promised to protect farm subsidies. Stenholm emphasized his social conservatism, his dedication to West Texas constituent services, and his independence as a Democrat. He criticized Neugebauer’s ads that suggested he supported abortion rights and sought to link Neugebauer with then-Majority Leader Tom DeLay of Texas, who was increasingly mired in ethics controversies. The Texas Farm Bureau, which earlier honored Stenholm as “one of the giants of Texas agriculture,” endorsed Neugebauer. He won 58%-40%, capturing 22 of the 27 counties. In Lubbock, Stenholm trailed 65%-33%. In his base of Abilene, which cast half as many votes as Lubbock, Stenholm led 50%-48%. Neugebauer has been easily reelected since.

In the House, Neugebauer believes in letting the private sector operate free from federal intervention. “A market system that’s left alone will reward good behavior and punish bad behavior. When government steps in, we almost try to reverse that,” he told The Texas Tribune in 2012. But his position is inconsistent on the issues of farm subsidies, which are popular in his district and which he has ardently defended as a member of the Agriculture Committee. The Environmental Working Group listed his district as the nation’s fourth-highest recipient of crop subsidies, and Neugebauer proposed expanding government crop insurance coverage to farmers during work on the 2012 farm bill. Before the House adopted a ban on earmarks in appropriations bills, he also was the leading procurer of money for Texas Tech University’s research. Defending the spending, he told The Dallas Morning News that projects “must fit within the budget, not add to the budget.”

In an attempt to show that President Barack Obama shouldn’t be immune from cost-cutting, he introduced an amendment to a spending bill in February 2011 to bar any money from being used on White House residence repairs; it was rejected overwhelmingly. He drew substantial attention in March 2010 when he acknowledged he was the lawmaker who shouted “baby killer” during Michigan Democratic Rep. Bart Stupak’s speech on abortion during the final debate before passage of the health care overhaul bill. (Neugebauer apologized for his outburst and said it was not directed at Stupak, who opposes abortion.) A charter member of the Tea Party Caucus, Neugebauer also was among the co-sponsors of Florida Rep. Bill Posey’s so-called “birther” bill in 2009 requiring future presidential candidates to provide a copy of their birth certificate. He unsuccessfully sought to strike everything but tax cuts from the 2009 economic stimulus bill.

On Financial Services, Neugebauer in 2013 became chairman of the Housing and Insurance Subcommittee. He told an audience of housing experts in 2011 that the federal government should get out of the foreclosure process. In the 112th Congress (2011-12), he sponsored or co-sponsored several measures aimed at reining in government-sponsored mortgage giants Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, but none became law. He chaired Financial Services’ oversight and investigations panel during the 112th and aggressively monitored the new consumer protection agency established in the Dodd-Frank financial overhaul law. He said in a 2011 radio interview that the consumer agency and other offices set up under Dodd-Frank “are little dictatorships.” His panel released a report in November 2012 on the collapse of the brokerage firm MF Global and urged lawmakers to consider combining the Securities and Exchange Commission and the Commodity Futures Trading Commission for greater efficiency and investor security.

Office Contact Information

MAIN OFFICE

(202) 225-4005

(202) 225-9615

LHOB- Longworth House Office Building Room 1424
Washington, DC 20515-4319

MAIN OFFICE

(202) 225-4005

(202) 225-9615

LHOB- Longworth House Office Building Room 1424
Washington, DC 20515-4319

DISTRICT OFFICE

(806) 763-1611

(806) 767-9168

611 University Avenue Suite 220
Lubbock, TX 79401-2206

DISTRICT OFFICE

(806) 763-1611

(806) 767-9168

611 University Avenue Suite 220
Lubbock, TX 79401-2206

DISTRICT OFFICE

(325) 675-9779

(325) 675-5038

500 Chestnut Street Suite 819
Abilene, TX 79602-1453

DISTRICT OFFICE

(325) 675-9779

(325) 675-5038

500 Chestnut Street Suite 819
Abilene, TX 79602-1453

DISTRICT OFFICE

(432) 264-0722

(432) 264-1838

1510 Scurry Street Suite B
Big Spring, TX 79720-4441

DISTRICT OFFICE

(432) 264-0722

(432) 264-1838

1510 Scurry Street Suite B
Big Spring, TX 79720-4441

CAMPAIGN OFFICE

PO Box 54175
Lubbock, TX 79453-9453

CAMPAIGN OFFICE

PO Box 54175
Lubbock, TX 79453-9453

Staff

Sort by: Interest Name Title

Abortion

Kelli McMorrow
Legislative Director

Aerospace

Kelli McMorrow
Legislative Director

Agriculture

Coleman Garrison
Senior Legislative Assistant

Appropriations

Kelli McMorrow
Legislative Director

Banking

Jared Sawyer
Professional Staff Member

Budget

Kelli McMorrow
Legislative Director

Campaign

Coleman Garrison
Senior Legislative Assistant

Commerce

Coleman Garrison
Senior Legislative Assistant

Jared Sawyer
Professional Staff Member

Consumers

Jared Sawyer
Professional Staff Member

Education

Coleman Garrison
Senior Legislative Assistant

Hannah Jaeckle
Legislative Correspondent

Energy

Kelli McMorrow
Legislative Director

Coleman Garrison
Senior Legislative Assistant

Environment

Kelli McMorrow
Legislative Director

Coleman Garrison
Senior Legislative Assistant

Family

Coleman Garrison
Senior Legislative Assistant

Finance

Kelli McMorrow
Legislative Director

Jared Sawyer
Professional Staff Member

Foreign

Kelli McMorrow
Legislative Director

Govt Ops

Coleman Garrison
Senior Legislative Assistant

Jared Sawyer
Professional Staff Member

Hannah Jaeckle
Legislative Correspondent

Grants

Dana Hulin
Staff Assistant

dana.hulin@mail.house.gov
(202) 225-4005

Lisa Brooks
District Representative

Jared Sawyer
Professional Staff Member

Gun Issues

Kelli McMorrow
Legislative Director

Health

Coleman Garrison
Senior Legislative Assistant

Homeland Security

Kelli McMorrow
Legislative Director

Housing

Jared Sawyer
Professional Staff Member

Human Rights

Coleman Garrison
Senior Legislative Assistant

Immigration

Coleman Garrison
Senior Legislative Assistant

Insurance

Jared Sawyer
Professional Staff Member

Intelligence

Kelli McMorrow
Legislative Director

Judiciary

Coleman Garrison
Senior Legislative Assistant

Labor

Coleman Garrison
Senior Legislative Assistant

Land Use

Coleman Garrison
Senior Legislative Assistant

Medicare

Coleman Garrison
Senior Legislative Assistant

Military

Kelli McMorrow
Legislative Director

Coleman Garrison
Senior Legislative Assistant

National Security

Kelli McMorrow
Legislative Director

Science

Kelli McMorrow
Legislative Director

Coleman Garrison
Senior Legislative Assistant

Small Business

Kelli McMorrow
Legislative Director

Coleman Garrison
Senior Legislative Assistant

Social Security

Coleman Garrison
Senior Legislative Assistant

Tax

Kelli McMorrow
Legislative Director

Jared Sawyer
Professional Staff Member

Technology

Kelli McMorrow
Legislative Director

Telecommunications

Kelli McMorrow
Legislative Director

Hannah Jaeckle
Legislative Correspondent

Trade

Coleman Garrison
Senior Legislative Assistant

Jared Sawyer
Professional Staff Member

Transportation

Coleman Garrison
Senior Legislative Assistant

Urban Affairs

Jared Sawyer
Professional Staff Member

Veterans

Coleman Garrison
Senior Legislative Assistant

Welfare

Coleman Garrison
Senior Legislative Assistant

Jared Sawyer
Professional Staff Member

Election Results

2012 GENERAL
Randy Neugebauer
Votes: 163,239
Percent: 84.99%
Richard Peterson
Votes: 28,824
Percent: 15.01%
2012 PRIMARY
Randy Neugebauer
Votes: 45,444
Percent: 74.31%
Chris Winn
Votes: 15,707
Percent: 25.69%
2010 GENERAL
Randy Neugebauer
Votes: 106,059
Percent: 77.78%
Andy Wilson
Votes: 25,984
Percent: 19.06%
2010 PRIMARY
Randy Neugebauer
Votes: 63,780
Percent: 100.0%
2008 GENERAL
Randy Neugebauer
Votes: 168,501
Percent: 72.44%
Dwight Fullingim
Votes: 58,030
Percent: 24.95%
2008 PRIMARY
Randy Neugebauer
Votes: 54,099
Percent: 100.0%
Prior Winning Percentages
2010 (78%), 2008 (72%), 2006 (68%), 2004 (58%), 2003 special (51%)

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