Almanac A members-only database of searchable profiles compiled and adapted from the Almanac of American Politics

Biography

Elected: 1994, 10th term.

Born: October 6, 1946, Austin, TX

Home: Austin, TX

Education: U. of TX, B.B.A. 1967, J.D. 1970

Professional Career: Practicing atty., 1970–89; Adjunct prof., U. of TX Law Schl., 1989–94.

Ethnicity: White/Caucasian

Religion: Methodist

Family: Married (Libby Belk) , 2 children ; 3 grandchildren

Lloyd Doggett, first elected in 1994, is a liberal Democrat and a respected voice in his party on tax and environmental issues. His political views and pugnaciousness have made him a target of Texas’ GOP-led redistricting, but he has eluded efforts to draw him out of a seat.

Doggett grew up in Austin, finished first in his class at the University of Texas, and was student body president in 1967. In 1972, at age 26, he was elected to the state Senate. In the 70s, as part of a large liberal bloc, he pushed for laws against job discrimination and cop-killer bullets and for generic drugs. He has long been a close ally of trial lawyers, the one strong institutional force supporting liberal Democrats in Texas. In the legislature, he was one of the “Killer Bees” who hid out to prevent a quorum on changing the rules in the Democratic primary and filibustered against what he called anti-consumer bills.

In 1984, he ran for the U.S. Senate, narrowly edging out two House members to win the Democratic nomination. Then, despite the campaign help of crack Democratic consultant James Carville, Doggett lost the general election 59%-41% to U.S. Rep. Phil Gramm, a Democrat who had switched to become a Republican. Doggett was elected to the Texas Supreme Court in 1988. When Democratic U.S. Rep. Jake Pickle retired after 31 years, Doggett ran for his seat. He won the Democratic primary with token opposition and in the general election won by a solid 56%-40%.

In the House, Doggett’s voting record puts him among the most-liberal Texans and near the center of all Democrats. He has been a close ally of Nancy Pelosi of California, backing her against fellow Texan Martin Frost in her 2002 race for minority leader. In 2002, he was a leader in opposing the resolution authorizing the use of force in Iraq. He is at times highly partisan. When Republicans won a House majority in 1994, he was a frequent critic of Republican Speaker Newt Gingrich and a close ally of Minority Whip David Bonior of Michigan, who led an effort to diminish Gingrich’s power by raising continual questions about his ethics.

In recent years, Doggett drew the most attention for a protracted standoff with Texas Republican Gov. Rick Perry in 2010 over a provision that Doggett added to a House-passed bill giving states aid to hire and retain teachers. The provision, which applied only to Texas, required the governor to maintain the state’s current level of education funding over the next three years, State Attorney General Greg Abbott filed suit, arguing Texas was unfairly singled out. Doggett was unrepentant: “Instead of running to the courtroom, the governor should focus on our classrooms,” he told The Texas Tribune. The requirement was eventually removed in the fiscal 2011 budget deal.

When Perry later decided to run for president, Doggett became a leading Lone Star critic. With tension still simmering from their fight over education funding, Doggett pulled no punches in seeking to paint Perry as an extremist. “He’s messed with Texas, and we think he shouldn’t mess with America,” Doggett said in August 2011.

Despite being in the minority in the House, Doggett has found ways to be effective. He got a bill into law in January 2013 setting up a national commission to examine ways to reduce the number of children who die from abuse and neglect. Texas has the nation’s highest rate of child abuse and neglect fatalities. The tax and spending deal approved that month to avoid a so-called “fiscal cliff” included an extension of a higher-education tax credit he had proposed. He also worked with Texas Republican Sam Johnson to get a bill through the House in December 2012 to authorize the phased removal of Social Security numbers from Medicare cards to crack down on identity theft.

When Democrats controlled the House between 2007 and 2010, Doggett was active and often influential on the Ways and Means Committee. His priorities included eliminating tax shelters and loopholes and giving the federal government power to negotiate prescription drug prices for Medicare. He also sought tax incentives for purchasers of plug-in hybrid electric cars. In May 2009, when President Barack Obama announced his plan to reform international tax policy, he cited Doggett’s input on proposals to crack down on overseas tax evasion. Doggett also pressed the president’s Simpson-Bowles fiscal commission to scrutinize the more than $1 trillion a year that the Internal Revenue Service provides in the form of reduced taxes or refunds to companies and individuals. The commission’s report called for eliminating most so-called “tax expenditures.” Doggett refused to back Obama’s tax-cut deal with Republicans in the 2010 lame-duck session for its inclusion of tax cuts for high-income taxpayers.

Republicans have long been giddy at the prospect that redistricting might end Doggett’s congressional career. In 2004, the GOP stretched his district 300 miles south to the Mexican border. But he took up the challenge. As some other dislocated Texas Democrats took their fight to the courts, Doggett took his case to the voters of his new district. If he lost, Doggett told voters, “Tom DeLay will have won,” a reference to the powerful GOP majority leader from Texas who had orchestrated the remap. Doggett won the primary 64%-36%. He led 88%-12% in Travis County and held Leticia Hinojosa, a former district court judge from McAllen, to a standoff in Hidalgo County.

Although the primary effectively sealed his reelection, Doggett faced a spirited challenge in the 2004 general from Becky Armendariz Klein. She called herself a conservative “new voice with new ideas” and cited her experience as policy director for Gov. George W. Bush and as chairwoman of the Texas Public Utility Commission. Doggett tweaked her for her bid for ethnic voters, saying she’d pulled out her “long forgotten maiden name” to run for the seat. He won 68%-31%, getting 79% in Travis County and 60% in Hidalgo County.

He had far less trouble in 2006 and 2008, winning with 67% and 66% respectively, after the Supreme Court ordered his district redrawn to include areas closer to Austin. In 2010, he drew a tough challenge from Republican Donna Campbell, a doctor and hospital emergency department director who raised more than $765,773. But Doggett spent $1.2 million and won 53%-45%, carrying Travis County by 2-to-1.

Texas Republicans overseeing redistricting in 2012 again sought to carve up Doggett’s liberal Austin base. They originally planned on stretching a district between San Antonio and Austin that would be heavily Hispanic. But a federal judges’ redistricting remap turned the 35th into a 60% Hispanic district that included some conservative rural counties. Initially, it appeared that state Rep. Joaquin Castro would run here, but when San Antonio Rep. Charlie Gonzalez announced his retirement, Castro decided to move to the 20th District. That enabled Doggett to easily win a three-way Democratic primary with 73% of the vote and then crush Republican San Marcos Mayor Susan Narvaiz in November with 64%.

Office Contact Information

MAIN OFFICE

(202) 225-4865

(202) 225-3073

RHOB- Rayburn House Office Building Room 2307
Washington, DC 20515-4335

MAIN OFFICE

(202) 225-4865

(202) 225-3073

RHOB- Rayburn House Office Building Room 2307
Washington, DC 20515-4335

DISTRICT OFFICE

(202) 225-4865

(202) 225-3073

Federal Building Room 763
Austin, TX 78701-3224

DISTRICT OFFICE

(202) 225-4865

(202) 225-3073

Federal Building Room 763
Austin, TX 78701-3224

DISTRICT OFFICE

(202) 225-4865

(202) 225-3073

217 West Travis Street
San Antonio, TX 78205-1421

DISTRICT OFFICE

(202) 225-4865

(202) 225-3073

217 West Travis Street
San Antonio, TX 78205-1421

CAMPAIGN OFFICE

(202) 225-4865

(202) 225-3073

1157 San Bernard Street
Austin, TX 78702

CAMPAIGN OFFICE

(202) 225-4865

(202) 225-3073

1157 San Bernard Street
Austin, TX 78702

EXPORT CONTACTS » *

Staff

Sort by: Interest Name Title

Aerospace

MaryEllen Veliz
District Director

Arts

MaryEllen Veliz
District Director

Budget

Amanda Tyler
Ways and Means Counsel; Senior Advisor; Counsel

Finance

MaryEllen Veliz
District Director

Health

Amanda Tyler
Ways and Means Counsel; Senior Advisor; Counsel

Immigration

Elisa Santana
Immigration Legislative Assistant

Intelligence

Doug Molof
Legislative Assistant

doug.molof@mail.house.gov
(202) 225-4865

Judiciary

Doug Molof
Legislative Assistant

doug.molof@mail.house.gov
(202) 225-4865

Military

Doug Molof
Legislative Assistant

doug.molof@mail.house.gov
(202) 225-4865

Small Business

MaryEllen Veliz
District Director

Social Security

Amanda Tyler
Ways and Means Counsel; Senior Advisor; Counsel

Tax

Amanda Tyler
Ways and Means Counsel; Senior Advisor; Counsel

Trade

Michael Mucchetti
Chief of Staff

Election Results

2012 GENERAL
Lloyd Doggett
Votes: 105,626
Percent: 63.96%
Susan Narvaiz
Votes: 52,894
Percent: 32.03%
2012 PRIMARY
Lloyd Doggett
Votes: 14,559
Percent: 73.25%
Sylvia Romo
Votes: 4,212
Percent: 21.19%
Maria Alvarado
Votes: 1,105
Percent: 5.56%
2010 GENERAL
Lloyd Doggett
Votes: 99,967
Percent: 52.82%
Donna Campbell
Votes: 84,849
Percent: 44.84%
2010 PRIMARY
Lloyd Doggett
Votes: 29,949
Percent: 100.0%
2008 GENERAL
Lloyd Doggett
Votes: 191,755
Percent: 65.83%
George Morovich
Votes: 88,693
Percent: 30.45%
2008 PRIMARY
Lloyd Doggett
Votes: 110,108
Percent: 100.0%
Prior Winning Percentages
2010 (53%), 2008 (66%), 2006 (67%), 2004 (68%), 2002 (84%), 2000 (85%), 1998 (85%), 1996 (56%), 1994 (56%)

* Export counts will reset after 30 days. Please contact your Dedicated Advisor if you have reached your limit.

To order a print copy of the 2016 edition of the Almanac of American Politics, click here. For questions about print orders, call Columbia Books at 1-888-265-0600 ext 0266 or email customer service.

For questions about the digital Almanac, please contact your Dedicated Advisor or Membership@NationalJournal.com.

×