Almanac A members-only database of searchable profiles compiled and adapted from the Almanac of American Politics

Biography

Elected: 2010, 2nd term.

Born: February 7, 1973, Memphis, TN

Home: Frog Jump, TN

Education: Crockett Cnty. H.S., 1990.

Professional Career: Partner, Fincher Farms; singer, Fincher Family

Ethnicity: White/Caucasian

Religion: Methodist

Family: Married (Lynn) , 3 children

Republican Stephen Fincher, a gospel-singing farmer from Frog Jump elected in 2010, is a rock-solid conservative. He pays attention to agriculture but concentrates on small businesses and manufacturing as well.

Since the age of 9, Fincher made the rounds of the gospel-singing circuit as a member of the Fincher Family, performing with his father, a cousin, and an uncle at more than 100 events a year around the region. (In Washington, he expanded his musical repertoire to play bass guitar in the rock band The Second Amendments with Reps. Collin Peterson, D-Minn., and Thaddeus McCotter, R-Mich.) He worked most of his life on the family farm, which produces cotton, corn, soybeans, and wheat. Fincher has said he had his own crop at age 12 and was developing budgets at 13.

In 2010, he decided to challenge Democratic Rep. John Tanner. But using the theme “Plow Congress,” he raised $300,000 so quickly, and without any staff, that his presence in the race was largely credited with prompting Tanner to retire. His primary fight against Shelby County Commissioner George Flinn and physician Ron Kirkland became one of the most expensive contests in the country: $7 million was spent in an area with one of the nation’s lowest median incomes. Fincher won with 48% of the vote.

After Tanner’s announcement, Democratic state Sen. Roy Herron decided to drop out of the gubernatorial race and run for the House seat. A farmer himself, as well as a Methodist preacher, an author, and a lawyer, Herron vowed that “No one will out-God me, no one will outgun me.”

Democrats criticized Fincher for collecting millions of dollars in federal farm subsidies between 1995 and 2006. He responded that he needed to participate in the program to earn a living. Despite that, he won the endorsement of several key tea party organizations in Tennessee. He bypassed the traditional campaign rituals of releasing his tax returns, appearing before newspaper editorial boards and debating Herron, whom he derided as a “career politician.” The National Republican Congressional Committee spent more than $250,000 during October alone to help him, and Fincher kept pace with Herron in fundraising, $2.7 million to $2.1 million, respectively. He won a resounding 59%-39% victory.

In the House, Fincher joined the Tea Party Caucus and was among those tied for most-conservative House member in National Journal’s 2011 rankings (he was 63rd in 2012). He supported the fiscal 2011 budget deal that President Barack Obama struck with House GOP leaders in April 2011 but earlier had been among the House lawmakers who rallied on the Senate steps in an effort to force the upper chamber to agree to larger spending cuts. “We were not sent here to go along and compromise,” he said. “We were sent to come up here and lead.”

Fincher later got a bill into law making it easier for small privately held firms to tap public capital markets through initial public offerings. He introduced another measure in 2012 to help the manufactured-housing industry—mobile home and house-trailer makers— contend with some requirements of the Dodd-Frank financial regulatory law that the industry has complained are overly burdensome. A separate bill of his introduced in 2013 would require states that want to receive full funding for welfare assistance to force applicants to submit to random drug testing. On the Agriculture Committee, he joined in conservative complaints about the regulation from the Environmental Protection Agency, saying, “We must cut the EPA’s legs off.”

For his 2012 reelection bid, Fincher raked in more than $2.2 million. He formed a leadership political action committee he named in honor of his hometown, Funding Republicans Supporting Opportunity and Growth (FROG) Jump PAC, that doled out $46,500 to candidates during the cycle. His 2012 Democratic challenger Timothy Dixon raised less than $27,000, and Fincher won 68%-28%.

Office Contact Information

MAIN OFFICE

(202) 225-4714

(202) 225-1765

RHOB- Rayburn House Office Building Room 2452
Washington, DC 20515-4208

MAIN OFFICE

(202) 225-4714

(202) 225-1765

RHOB- Rayburn House Office Building Room 2452
Washington, DC 20515-4208

DISTRICT OFFICE

(731) 588-5190

406 Lindell Street Suite C
Martin, TN 38237-2481

DISTRICT OFFICE

(202) 225-4714

(202) 225-1765

406 Lindell Street Suite C
Martin, TN 38237-2481

DISTRICT OFFICE

(731) 285-0910

(731) 285-5008

100 South Main Street Suite 1
Dyersburg, TN 38024-4663

DISTRICT OFFICE

(202) 225-4714

(202) 225-1765

100 South Main Street Suite 1
Dyersburg, TN 38024-4663

DISTRICT OFFICE

(202) 225-4714

(202) 225-1765

117 North Liberty Street
Jackson, TN 38301-6205

DISTRICT OFFICE

(731) 423-4848

(731) 427-1537

117 North Liberty Street
Jackson, TN 38301-6205

DISTRICT OFFICE

(202) 225-4714

(202) 225-1765

5384 Poplar Avenue Suite 410
Memphis, TN 38119-0605

DISTRICT OFFICE

(901) 682-4422

5384 Poplar Avenue Suite 410
Memphis, TN 38119-0605

DISTRICT OFFICE

(901) 581-4718

12015 Walker Street
Arlington, TN 38002-5322

DISTRICT OFFICE

(202) 225-4714

(202) 225-1765

12015 Walker Street
Arlington, TN 38002-5322

CAMPAIGN OFFICE

PO Box 11153
Jackson, TN 38308

CAMPAIGN OFFICE

(202) 225-4714

(202) 225-1765

PO Box 11153
Jackson, TN 38308

EXPORT CONTACTS » *

Staff

Sort by: Interest Name Title

Agriculture

Corey Schrodt
Legislative Director

Budget

Corey Schrodt
Legislative Director

Health

Corey Schrodt
Legislative Director

Military

Kathleen Carlson
Legislative Assistant

Tax

Corey Schrodt
Legislative Director

Technology

Kathleen Carlson
Legislative Assistant

Telecommunications

Kathleen Carlson
Legislative Assistant

Transportation

Kathleen Carlson
Legislative Assistant

Election Results

2014 GENERAL
Stephen Fincher
Votes: 122,205
Percent: 70.84%
Wes Bradley
Votes: 42,403
Percent: 24.58%
2012 GENERAL
Stephen Fincher
Votes: 190,923
Percent: 68.33%
Timothy Dixon
Votes: 79,490
Percent: 28.45%
2012 PRIMARY
Stephen Fincher
Votes: 60,355
Percent: 86.66%
Annette Justice
Votes: 9,288
Percent: 13.34%
2010 GENERAL
Stephen Fincher
Votes: 98,759
Percent: 58.99%
Roy Herron
Votes: 64,960
Percent: 38.8%
2010 PRIMARY
Stephen Fincher
Votes: 35,024
Percent: 48.48%
Ron Kirkland
Votes: 17,637
Percent: 24.41%
George Flinn
Votes: 17,308
Percent: 23.96%
Prior Winning Percentages
2010 (59%)

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