Almanac A members-only database of searchable profiles compiled and adapted from the Almanac of American Politics

Biography

Elected: 1992, 11th term.

Born: February 19, 1946, Greensboro, NC

Home: Manhattan, NY

Education: Greensboro Col, A.B. 1968

Professional Career: NYC Bd. of Ed., 1970–77; Legis. aide, NY Assembly & NY Senate, 1977–82.

Ethnicity: White/Caucasian

Religion: Presbyterian

Family: Widow , 2 children

Democrat Carolyn Maloney, first elected in 1992, is known for her forceful efforts on behalf of women and consumers and is one of the most prolific legislators on Capitol Hill.

Born and educated in North Carolina, she visited New York in 1970 at the age of 22, loved it, and “just stayed.” She taught adult-education classes in East Harlem and, from 1977 to 1982, was an influential legislative staffer in Albany. She was elected to the New York City Council in 1982. Redistricting in 1992 made the Silk Stocking district more Democratic, and Maloney ran against incumbent Bill Green, an independent Republican who shared Manhattan’s cultural liberalism. But he was poorly positioned to appeal to voters in the outer-borough neighborhoods that had been added to the district, who preferred Republicans to be conservative on cultural issues but liberal on economics. Maloney lost the Manhattan part of the district 50%-44% but carried Queens heavily, winning 50%-48% overall.

Maloney has a mostly liberal voting record. She is a senior member of the Financial Services Committee, where she has been a leading voice on banking issues. Annoyed by Republican efforts to block the confirmation of a Consumer Financial Protection Bureau director, as established in the Dodd-Frank Wall Street overhaul, she unsuccessfully proposed an amendment in July 2011 to have the Treasury secretary assume the CFPB director’s duties if a nominee weren’t confirmed. She had a hand in crafting Dodd-Frank in 2010, working with Sen. Richard Durbin, D-Ill., to achieve a compromise on interchange fees charged on consumers’ debit cards. The fees had been an area of contention between merchants worried about their high rates and the financial industry’s worries that lower fees would not cover their costs. She also worked to win House passage of her bill to promote more transparent practices by credit card companies and to restrict abusive lending practices. She called the bill “a much-needed correction to a market that is out of balance.” With a boost from President Barack Obama, the bill was enacted in 2009.

Even though she has many constituents in banking, Maloney had tough rhetoric for bankers who took millions of dollars in bonuses after their firms received federal bailout money in 2008. But she did join in a fight in early 2010 against a proposed .25% tax on stock transactions above $100,000. In earlier years, she worked to keep banks from controlling other businesses, sought more oversight of the Federal Reserve, and added privacy provisions to financial modernization bills. She helped to craft reforms tightening rules for foreign investment. With an eye to her corporate constituents, she voted for normal trade relations with China.

A leader of the Women’s Caucus, Maloney drew national attention in February 2012 for walking out of an Oversight and Government Reform Committee hearing on contraception and religious protection after pointing out its all-male witness list. “What I want to know is, where are the women?” she asked. She also blasted GOP efforts to bar funding for Planned Parenthood and prenatal care. When conservatives that year removed expanded protections for lesbians and Native Americans in a reauthorization of the Violence Against Women Act, Maloney called it “as chilling and callous as anything I have seen come before this Congress in modern times.” Earlier, she demanded that theFood and Drug Administration permit over-the-counter sales of morning-after birth-control pills, and she opposed separating men and women in basic training in the military.

In 2007, with Sen. Edward Kennedy, D-Mass., Maloney introduced the Women’s Equality Amendment, a latter-day version of the Equal Rights Amendment, which had fallen three states short of constitutional ratification in the 1970s. She reintroduced the measure in 2011. The House passed her 2008 bill to give eight weeks of paid leave to federal employees for the birth or adoption of a child. Also that year, she published a book called, Rumors of Our Progress Have Been Greatly Exaggerated: Why Women’s Lives Aren’t Getting Any EasierAnd How We Can Make Real Progress for Ourselves and Our Daughters.

With part of her district in Lower Manhattan and close to Ground Zero, Maloney was heavily involved in the government response to the September 11 attacks. She was among the most outspoken House Democrats urging President George W. Bush to quickly send New York the $20 billion that Congress approved for cleanup and recovery. But her proposal to give a $1,000 tax credit to visitors to the city went nowhere. In 2010, she and several other New York lawmakers steered into law a long-delayed measure to compensate September 11 first responders with health problems. “It is so fair, it is so right, it should have passed nine years ago,” she said. When gun violence became a prominent topic following the Newtown, Conn., school massacre, she introduced a bipartisan bill in February 2013 to make firearms trafficking a federal crime and to impose stronger penalties for straw purchasers buying guns for convicted felons.

Maloney made a bid for the top Democratic slot on Oversight and Government Reform after Democrats lost the House majority in 2010. Many Democrats contended that the departing chairman, New York’s Edolphus Towns, lacked the aggressiveness to stand up to California’s Darrell Issa, the incoming GOP chairman. Towns bowed out of the race and threw his support to Maloney, who campaigned vigorously. But she lost to the less senior Elijah Cummings of Maryland on a vote of 33-18 in the Democratic Steering Committee and 119-61 in the Democratic Caucus. Cummings reportedly had the pivotal backing of Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi.

Maloney has a firm lock on the district. She was bitterly disappointed when Democratic Gov. David Paterson appointed the less-seasoned Rep. Kirsten Gillibrand to the Senate seat vacated by Hillary Clinton in 2009. Maloney publicly questioned Gillibrand’s conservative stance on issues such as gun control and curbing illegal immigration, and she began raising money for a primary challenge in 2010. But in August 2009 she heeded the calls of Obama and senior New York Democrats to give Gillibrand a clear path to the nomination. She endured a wrenching personal setback the next month, when her husband, Clifton, died on a mountain-climbing expedition in the Himalayas.

One of Maloney’s leisure-time pursuits is tae kwon do; she has the distinction of being the first woman in Congress to earn a black belt in martial arts. “It energizes you, it makes you think, and it gives you goals to reach,” she told the Associated Press.

Office Contact Information

MAIN OFFICE

(202) 225-7944

(202) 225-4709

RHOB- Rayburn House Office Building Room 2308
Washington, DC 20515-3212

MAIN OFFICE

(202) 225-7944

(202) 225-4709

RHOB- Rayburn House Office Building Room 2308
Washington, DC 20515-3212

DISTRICT OFFICE

(202) 225-7944

(202) 225-4709

1651 Third Avenue Suite 311
New York, NY 10128-3679

DISTRICT OFFICE

(212) 860-0606

(212) 860-0704

1651 Third Avenue Suite 311
New York, NY 10128-3679

DISTRICT OFFICE

(202) 225-7944

(202) 225-4709

31-19 Newtown Avenue
Astoria, NY 11102

DISTRICT OFFICE

(718) 932-1804

(718) 932-1805

31-19 Newtown Avenue
Astoria, NY 11102

DISTRICT OFFICE

(202) 225-7944

(202) 225-4709

619 Lorimer Street
Brooklyn, NY 11211-2228

DISTRICT OFFICE

(718) 349-5972

(718) 349-5973

619 Lorimer Street
Brooklyn, NY 11211

CAMPAIGN OFFICE

(202) 225-7944

(202) 225-4709

24 East 93rd Street Suite 4-B
New York, NY 10128-0627

EXPORT CONTACTS » *

Staff

Sort by: Interest Name Title

Abortion

Christina Parisi
Legislative Director

Aerospace

Max Whitcomb
Legislative Assistant

Agriculture

Chris Gorud
Legislative Assistant

Animal Rights

Max Whitcomb
Legislative Assistant

Appropriations

Christina Parisi
Legislative Director

Arts

Max Whitcomb
Legislative Assistant

Chris Gorud
Legislative Assistant

Banking

Ben Harney
Legislative Counsel

ben.harney@mail.house.gov
(202) 225-7944

Budget

Michael Iger
Chief of Staff

Communication

Chris Gorud
Legislative Assistant

Consumers

Chris Gorud
Legislative Assistant

Crime

Chris Gorud
Legislative Assistant

Economics

Chris Gorud
Legislative Assistant

Education

Chris Gorud
Legislative Assistant

Energy

Chris Gorud
Legislative Assistant

Environment

Chris Gorud
Legislative Assistant

Family

Chris Gorud
Legislative Assistant

Finance

Ben Harney
Legislative Counsel

ben.harney@mail.house.gov
(202) 225-7944

Foreign

Christina Parisi
Legislative Director

Govt Ops

Christina Parisi
Legislative Director

Health

Christina Parisi
Legislative Director

Homeland Security

Chris Gorud
Legislative Assistant

Human Rights

Chris Gorud
Legislative Assistant

Immigration

Chris Gorud
Legislative Assistant

Intelligence

Chris Gorud
Legislative Assistant

Judiciary

Chris Gorud
Legislative Assistant

Labor

Max Whitcomb
Legislative Assistant

Chris Gorud
Legislative Assistant

Lobbying Politics

Chris Gorud
Legislative Assistant

Military

Chris Gorud
Legislative Assistant

Minorities

Christina Parisi
Legislative Director

Native Americans

Max Whitcomb
Legislative Assistant

Privacy

Chris Gorud
Legislative Assistant

Public Works

Chris Gorud
Legislative Assistant

Religion

Chris Gorud
Legislative Assistant

Science

Max Whitcomb
Legislative Assistant

Seniors

Max Whitcomb
Legislative Assistant

Small Business

Chris Gorud
Legislative Assistant

Social Security

Max Whitcomb
Legislative Assistant

Tax

Chris Gorud
Legislative Assistant

Technology

Chris Gorud
Legislative Assistant

Telecommunications

Chris Gorud
Legislative Assistant

Trade

Chris Gorud
Legislative Assistant

Transportation

Chris Gorud
Legislative Assistant

Veterans

Max Whitcomb
Legislative Assistant

Welfare

Max Whitcomb
Legislative Assistant

Women

Christina Parisi
Legislative Director

Election Results

2014 GENERAL
Carolyn Maloney
Votes: 83,870
Percent: 79.85%
Nicholas Di Iorio
Votes: 21,160
Percent: 20.15%
2012 GENERAL
Carolyn Maloney
Votes: 194,370
Percent: 80.56%
Christopher Wight
Votes: 46,841
Percent: 19.44%
2012 PRIMARY
Carolyn Maloney
Unopposed
2010 GENERAL
Carolyn Maloney
Votes: 107,327
Percent: 75.03%
David Brumberg
Votes: 32,065
Percent: 22.42%
2010 PRIMARY
Carolyn Maloney
Votes: 27,957
Percent: 84.0%
Reshma Saujani
Votes: 4,971
Percent: 15.0%
2008 GENERAL
Carolyn Maloney
Votes: 183,190
Percent: 79.91%
Robert Heim
Votes: 43,365
Percent: 18.92%
2008 PRIMARY
Carolyn Maloney
Unopposed
Prior Winning Percentages
2010 (75%), 2008 (80%), 2006 (84%), 2004 (81%), 2002 (75%), 2000 (74%), 1998 (77%), 1996 (72%), 1994 (64%), 1992 (50%)

* Export counts will reset after 30 days. Please contact your Dedicated Advisor if you have reached your limit.

To order a print copy of the 2016 edition of the Almanac of American Politics, click here. For questions about print orders, call Columbia Books at 1-888-265-0600 ext 0266 or email customer service.

For questions about the digital Almanac, please contact your Dedicated Advisor or Membership@NationalJournal.com.

×