Almanac A members-only database of searchable profiles compiled and adapted from the Almanac of American Politics

Biography

Elected: 2002, 6th term.

Born: June 27, 1945, Aynor, SC

Home: Atlanta, GA

Education: FL A&M U., B.A. 1967, U. of PA, M.B.A. 1969

Professional Career: Founder and pres., Dayn-Mark Advertising, 1979-2002.

Ethnicity: Black/African American

Religion: Baptist

Family: Married (Alfredia Aaron) , 2 children ; 2 grandchildren

Democrat David Scott, first elected in 2002, is distinctly more of a centrist than his liberal fellow members of the Congressional Black Caucus. He gets along well with GOP colleagues, some of whom he knows from his three decades in the Georgia legislature, and he avoids publicly criticizing them.

Born in rural South Carolina, Scott is the son of a minister and grandson of a deacon. During his middle school years, his family moved to tony Scarsdale, N.Y., where his parents took jobs as a chauffeur and housekeeper for a wealthy family. Scott was the only African-American in his otherwise all-white school. He later graduated from Florida A&M University then did an internship at the U.S. Labor Department in Washington. There he met George Taylor, an authority in labor-management relations who encouraged the bright young man to apply to the prestigious Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania, which Scott did, eventually earning his M.B.A. He moved to Atlanta in the early 1970s, and in 1974, he was elected to the Georgia House. In 1982, he won election to the state Senate, where he chaired the Rules Committee. From 1979 to 2002, he owned Dayn-Mark Advertising, which creates and places radio, television, and print ads. The firm is now operated by his wife and two daughters.

In 2002, Scott made a bid for the newly created 13th District seat. It was obvious that the primary would be decisive in the heavily Democratic district. Four other Democrats ran, the best known of whom was former state party Chairman David Worley, who had nearly defeated Republican Rep. Newt Gingrich in 1990. Scott, however, was familiar to many voters after more than a quarter-century in the state legislature. And if they didn’t know Scott, they certainly knew of his campaign co-chairman: Hank Aaron, the Hall of Fame slugger and Atlanta-area icon, who is Scott’s brother-in-law. Scott brought his advertising expertise to the campaign, plastering the interstate highways with eye-catching billboards. His chief competitors, Worley and state Sen. Greg Hecht of Clayton County, both white, ran ads attacking each other. Scott won the primary with 54% of the vote. He won the general election 60%-40%.

In the House, Scott has introduced relatively few bills but has been an active presence in his district, sponsoring health and job fairs as well as “help for homeowners” events giving constituents the ability to ask questions of federal housing officials. He has been a more faithful party vote in recent years but has had no reluctance about going his own way. He joined most Republicans in calling for an audit of the Federal Reserve in 2012 and was one of just six House Democrats in 2011 to vote to nullify the Federal Communications Commission’s network-neutrality rules for broadband service providers. In 2003, he was one of seven House Democrats to vote for final passage of President Bush’s tax cut and one of 16 to vote for the new Republican prescription drug benefit under Medicare. He split with most of his party by voting for the constitutional amendment to ban same-sex marriage. Though usually reserved, he drew national attention in 2009 when he engaged in a heated give-and-take with town hall audience members over health care reform. He ended up receiving threatening phone calls and hate mail, and a swastika was painted outside his Smyrna office.

On the Financial Services Committee, Scott criticized predatory lenders that exploit would-be homeowners in poor communities, but he was reluctant to pass measures to eliminate favorable interest deals. He initially opposed the bailout of the financial markets, but after Chairman Barney Frank, D-Mass., promised to address the Black Caucus’ call for additional protections for homeowners facing foreclosure, Scott switched his vote in support of a revised version. He also serves on the Agriculture Committee, and chaired the livestock, dairy and poultry subcommittee before Democrats lost the majority. He joined Republicans in December 2011 in criticizing Commodity Futures Trading Commission Chairman Gary Gensler for not showing up at a hearing on MF Global, the commodities brokerage firm headed by former Democratic Sen. Jon Corzine of New Jersey that had collapsed several months earlier. “It’s an example of why the American people are rapidly losing faith in Washington,” Scott said.

In 2006, Scott faced a primary challenge from Donzella James, who served 10 years in the state Senate and criticized Scott for living outside the district. Scott won 67%-33%. In the general election, he was opposed by first-time candidate Deborah Honeycutt, a family physician who surprisingly raised $1.3 million. But she had little name recognition and lost 69%-31%.

Before the 2008 election, Scott was the subject of several unflattering stories about back taxes he owed on his home and business, and about payments out of his campaign fund to family members and Dayn-Mark Advertising. Since his first congressional race in 2002, Scott’s campaign had paid a total of $643,000 to his family and to Dayn-Mark and its employees. An attorney for Scott said that the transactions were legal under campaign finance law.

Nonetheless, Scott attracted both primary and general election challenges in 2008 and 2010. In the 2008 Democratic primary, James again challenged Scott and attacked him for backing President George W. Bush on the war in Iraq, for favoring the GOP prescription drug benefit, and for opposing increases in education funding. Scott won 64%-36%. In a November rematch, Honeycutt upped the stakes considerably by spending $5.2 million to try to defeat Scott, who spent far less, $1.4 million. Despite the negative news stories about his finances, Scott swamped Honeycutt, 69%-31%. He has had easy reelections since.

Office Contact Information

MAIN OFFICE

(202) 225-2939

(202) 225-4628

CHOB- Cannon House Office Building Room 225
Washington, DC 20515-1013

MAIN OFFICE

(202) 225-2939

(202) 225-4628

CHOB- Cannon House Office Building Room 225
Washington, DC 20515-1013

DISTRICT OFFICE

(770) 210-5073

(770) 210-5673

173 North Main Street
Jonesboro, GA 30236-3567

DISTRICT OFFICE

(770) 210-5073

(770) 210-5673

173 North Main Street
Jonesboro, GA 30236-3567

DISTRICT OFFICE

(770) 432-5405

(770) 432-5813

888 Concord Road Suite 100
Smyrna, GA 30080-4202

DISTRICT OFFICE

(770) 432-5405

(770) 432-5813

888 Concord Road Suite 100
Smyrna, GA 30080-4202

CAMPAIGN OFFICE

162 Hurt Street, NE
Atlanta, GA 30307

CAMPAIGN OFFICE

162 Hurt Street, NE
Atlanta, GA 30307

EXPORT CONTACTS » *

Staff

Sort by: Interest Name Title

Abortion

Ashley Osterkamp
Legislative Assistant

Aerospace

William Burriss
Legislative Correspondent

Agriculture

Ashley Osterkamp
Legislative Assistant

Animal Rights

Ashley Osterkamp
Legislative Assistant

Arts

Taylor Stanley
Legislative Correspondent; Legislative Assistant

Banking

Ashley Osterkamp
Legislative Assistant

Budget

Ashley Osterkamp
Legislative Assistant

Campaign

William Burriss
Legislative Correspondent

Commerce

Ashley Osterkamp
Legislative Assistant

Crime

Taylor Stanley
Legislative Correspondent; Legislative Assistant

Education

Taylor Stanley
Legislative Correspondent; Legislative Assistant

Energy

Ashley Osterkamp
Legislative Assistant

Environment

Ashley Osterkamp
Legislative Assistant

Foreign

Ashley Osterkamp
Legislative Assistant

Govt Ops

William Burriss
Legislative Correspondent

Housing

Ashley Osterkamp
Legislative Assistant

Human Rights

Taylor Stanley
Legislative Correspondent; Legislative Assistant

Immigration

Ashley Osterkamp
Legislative Assistant

Isaac Dodoo
Deputy District Director; Constituent Services Representative; Immigration Specialist

isaacdodoo@mail.house.gov
(770) 432-5405

Land Use

Ashley Osterkamp
Legislative Assistant

Military

Dylan Nurse
Constituent Services Representative

Native Americans

Ashley Osterkamp
Legislative Assistant

Science

William Burriss
Legislative Correspondent

Small Business

Ashley Osterkamp
Legislative Assistant

Tax

Ashley Osterkamp
Legislative Assistant

Technology

William Burriss
Legislative Correspondent

Telecommunications

William Burriss
Legislative Correspondent

Urban Affairs

Ashley Osterkamp
Legislative Assistant

Veterans

Dylan Nurse
Constituent Services Representative

Welfare

Taylor Stanley
Legislative Correspondent; Legislative Assistant

Women

Ashley Osterkamp
Legislative Assistant

Election Results

2012 GENERAL
David Scott
Votes: 201,988
Percent: 71.74%
Shahid Malik
Votes: 79,550
Percent: 28.26%
2012 PRIMARY
David Scott
Unopposed
2010 GENERAL
David Scott
Votes: 140,294
Percent: 69.43%
Mike Crane
Votes: 61,771
Percent: 30.57%
2010 PRIMARY
David Scott
Votes: 34,374
Percent: 76.12%
Mike Murphy
Votes: 7,556
Percent: 16.73%
Michael Frisbee
Votes: 3,229
Percent: 7.15%
2008 GENERAL
David Scott
Votes: 205,919
Percent: 69.04%
Deborah Honeycutt
Votes: 92,320
Percent: 30.96%
2008 PRIMARY
David Scott
Votes: 30,719
Percent: 63.67%
Donzella James
Votes: 17,526
Percent: 36.33%
Prior Winning Percentages
2010 (69%), 2008 (69%), 2006 (69%), 2004 (100%), 2002 (60%)

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