Almanac A members-only database of searchable profiles compiled and adapted from the Almanac of American Politics

Biography

Elected: 2008, 3rd term.

Born: December 18, 1947, Washington, DC

Home: Rockledge, FL

Education: Brevard Comm. Col., A.A. 1969.

Professional Career: McDonnell Douglas Astronautics Co., 1966-69; Crawford & Co./Gay & Taylor, 1970-74; Founder, Posey & Co. Realtors, 1974-present.

Ethnicity: White/Caucasian

Religion: Methodist

Family: Married (Katie Ingram) , 2 children; 3 grandchildren

Bill Posey, a Republican first elected in 2008, almost instantly became controversial for introducing a bill requiring future presidential candidates to provide birth certificates proving they are natural-born U.S. citizens. Yet he also has been lauded for serious work in Congress; Florida Today columnist Matt Reed wrote in 2011 that Posey “does his homework and seems motivated by an almost wonkish devotion to fiscal responsibility.”

Posey was born in Washington, D.C., but moved several times due to his father’s work in the aircraft business. His family landed in Brevard County in 1956, and after graduating from high school, Posey took a job with McDonnell Douglas Astronautics at the Kennedy Space Center. He worked on the Apollo 11 Launch Team and attended Brevard Community College at night. After Apollo 11 successfully put men on the moon, Posey was laid off. He changed careers and went into real estate. He founded Posey & Co. Realtors in 1974 and is still president of the company. Posey is also an accomplished stock car racer – he said he first got behind the wheel at the tracks at age 14 – although since an accident at an Orlando speedway in 2004 left him with spinal fractures, he has taken a break from racing.

Posey was the first member of his family to register as a Republican, a decision inadvertently inspired by a college professor who lauded the Democratic Party’s championing of inflation and deficit spending. “He literally was trying to convince the class that inflation was good because you could buy the things you wanted now and finance them later with cheaper money,” Posey recalls. He was elected to the Rockledge City Council in 1976 and served until 1986. Four years later, he won a seat in the Florida House of Representatives, where he authored legislation that set new standards for state government accountability. He also wrote a book entitled Activity Based Total Accountability detailing his work on the issue. He served in the state House until 2000, when term limits forced him to resign. He then won a close state Senate race.

After seven-term GOP Rep. Dave Weldon announced his retirement in early 2008, Posey decided to run for the seat. He got Weldon’s endorsement and that of Florida GOP Chairman Jim Greer, who called for the party to unite behind Posey. Veteran state Rep. Stan Mayfield, who had also announced his candidacy, fell in line, withdrew from the race, and endorsed Posey. Florida Democrats were unable to find a strong candidate, and Posey became the clear favorite to win the general election. He won the GOP primary with 77% of the vote and faced Democrat Stephen Blythe, a Melbourne family physician, in the general.

Posey made government accountability and reform of the immigration system the central themes of his campaign. It was an amiable contest. The candidates expressed mutual admiration and said that they would vote for each other if they could not vote for themselves. Posey outspent Blythe by almost 9-to-1 and won 53% to 42%.

Once in Washington, Posey’s birth certificate bill came at the height of the 2009 “birther” flap on the far right over whether President Barack Obama was born overseas, and made Posey the target of considerable venom in the liberal blogosphere. He contended his bill had nothing to do with Obama, but even some of his GOP colleagues publicly expressed their distaste with the proposal. He subsequently joined Republicans in opposing Obama’s major legislative initiatives, but showed a willingness to occasionally break with his party. He voted with Democrats on extending unemployment benefits and joined Florida Democrat Suzanne Kosmas on her bill to double the one-year waiting period before members who leave their seats can lobby ex-colleagues. Though he is among the chamber’s staunchest economic and social conservatives, his skepticism in 2011 about the war in Afghanistan made him practically a centrist on foreign policy: He was among just 16 House Republicans to vote in support of a phased withdrawal of troops there, and two months later, he was one of 61 to support reducing funding for the Afghanistan Infrastructure Fund by $200 million. Not that he was a pacifist – he joined fellow Florida Republican Jeff Miller in opposing a 2010 resolution to wish Iranians a prosperous new year, saying that Americans shouldn’t be lulled into complacency by that country’s efforts to develop nuclear bombs.

Posey has continued his quest for more accountability in government from his statehouse days. He succeeded in getting the Financial Services Committee to post the results of every committee vote on its website within two days. He also got through a proposal to require a 72-hour waiting period before legislation can be brought to the House floor, and he introduced another measure to require state governments to submit fiscal accounting reports as a condition of getting federal money. But he also drew scorn in November 2012 when he grilled a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention official at an Oversight and Government Reform Committee hearing on studying vaccinated and unvaccinated children to determine if vaccines cause autism – an issue that the scientific community has said has no merit.

Posey coasted to reelection in 2010 and 2012, receiving 65% and 59% of the vote, respectively, in facing Democrat Carolyn “Shannon” Roberts both times. After the 2012 election, he was appointed to the Space, Science, and Technology Committee, giving him a more prominent post from which to advocate on behalf of the Kennedy Space Center and a Space Coast still figuring out how to live with NASA cutbacks.

Office Contact Information

MAIN OFFICE

(202) 225-3671

(202) 225-3516

CHOB- Cannon House Office Building Room 120
Washington, DC 20515-0908

MAIN OFFICE

(202) 225-3671

(202) 225-3516

CHOB- Cannon House Office Building Room 120
Washington, DC 20515-0908

DISTRICT OFFICE

(321) 632-1776

(321) 639-8595

Building C
Melbourne, FL 32940-6605

DISTRICT OFFICE

(321) 632-1776

(321) 639-8595

Building C
Melbourne, FL 32940-6605

CAMPAIGN OFFICE

(321) 254-6282

PO Box 411486
Melbourne, FL 32941

CAMPAIGN OFFICE

PO Box 411486
Melbourne, FL 32941

EXPORT CONTACTS » *

Staff

Sort by: Interest Name Title

Abortion

Christen Kapavik
Senior Legislative Assistant

Aerospace

Marcus Brubaker
Chief of Staff

George Cecala
Deputy Chief of Staff; Communications Director

Christen Kapavik
Senior Legislative Assistant

Agriculture

Christen Kapavik
Senior Legislative Assistant

Animal Rights

Christen Kapavik
Senior Legislative Assistant

Appropriations

George Cecala
Deputy Chief of Staff; Communications Director

Banking

Patrick Deitz
Legislative Director

Budget

Patrick Deitz
Legislative Director

Communication

George Cecala
Deputy Chief of Staff; Communications Director

Energy

Patrick Deitz
Legislative Director

Environment

Patrick Deitz
Legislative Director

Finance

Patrick Deitz
Legislative Director

Foreign

Christen Kapavik
Senior Legislative Assistant

Govt Ops

Tim Wilt
Legislative Correspondent

Grants

Darren Gaddis
Executive Assistant

Gun Issues

Patrick Deitz
Legislative Director

Health

Christen Kapavik
Senior Legislative Assistant

Homeland Security

Patrick Deitz
Legislative Director

Housing

Patrick Deitz
Legislative Director

Insurance

Patrick Deitz
Legislative Director

Judiciary

Patrick Deitz
Legislative Director

Labor

George Cecala
Deputy Chief of Staff; Communications Director

Military

Christen Kapavik
Senior Legislative Assistant

Science

Christen Kapavik
Senior Legislative Assistant

Tax

Patrick Deitz
Legislative Director

Technology

Christen Kapavik
Senior Legislative Assistant

Telecommunications

George Cecala
Deputy Chief of Staff; Communications Director

Tim Wilt
Legislative Correspondent

Trade

Patrick Deitz
Legislative Director

Transportation

George Cecala
Deputy Chief of Staff; Communications Director

Veterans

Christen Kapavik
Senior Legislative Assistant

Election Results

2012 GENERAL
Bill Posey
Votes: 205,432
Percent: 58.88%
Shannon Roberts
Votes: 130,870
Percent: 37.51%
2012 PRIMARY
Bill Posey
Unopposed
2010 GENERAL
Bill Posey
Votes: 157,079
Percent: 64.73%
Shannon Roberts
Votes: 85,595
Percent: 35.27%
2010 PRIMARY
Bill Posey
Unopposed
2008 GENERAL
Bill Posey
Votes: 192,151
Percent: 53.1%
Stephen Blythe
Votes: 151,951
Percent: 41.99%
2008 PRIMARY
Bill Posey
Votes: 40,892
Percent: 76.84%
Alan Bergman
Votes: 7,809
Percent: 14.67%
Kevin Lehoullier
Votes: 4,519
Percent: 8.49%
Prior Winning Percentages
2010 (65%), 2008 (53%)

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