Almanac A members-only database of searchable profiles compiled and adapted from the Almanac of American Politics

Biography

Elected: 2000, 7th term.

Born: September 1, 1944, Jacksonville

Home: Jacksonville

Education: U. of GA, B.A. 1966, U. of FL, J.D. 1969

Professional Career: Investment banker, 1980-2000.

Ethnicity: White/Caucasian

Religion: Episcopalian

Family: married (Kitty) , 2 children

Ander Crenshaw, a Republican first elected in 2000, is a low-profile conservative, preferring to work quietly on helping his district as a member of the Appropriations Committee. When The Hill newspaper once asked him what he considered his biggest political achievement, he answered wryly: “Having several little political achievements.”

Crenshaw grew up in Jacksonville, where he has family roots dating to the early 20th century. The son of a lawyer, he attended the University of Georgia on a basketball scholarship, and then graduated from the University of Florida law school. His wife’s father, Claude Kirk, was a one-term Republican governor of Florida in the 1960s. Crenshaw was elected to the state House in 1972 and served for six years, before running unsuccessfully for secretary of state. He then became an investment banker. In 1980, he ran for the U.S. Senate and finished third of six in the 1980 Republican primary, which was won by Paula Hawkins. From 1986 until 1993, he served in the state Senate and in 1992, became the first Republican state Senate president in 118 years. He ran for governor in 1994 but finished fourth in the primary, far behind Jeb Bush, who narrowly lost to Lawton Chiles in November. Crenshaw’s opportunity to run for the House came in 2000, when Republican Rep. Tillie Fowler announced that she would honor her promise to serve only four terms. Crenshaw was promptly endorsed by local Republican leaders, which discouraged several potential candidates. He won the primary 70%-30% and the general election 67%-31%. He has won reelection easily since then, though he drew some flak from local Republicans for supporting the 2008 financial industry rescue.

In the House, Crenshaw is a reliable conservative who was among the first House Republicans to join the Tea Party Caucus in 2010. But his service on Appropriations has made him a bit more centrist on foreign policy issues, particularly U.S. foreign aid. He and Washington state Democrat Adam Smith in 2011 launched the Congressional Caucus on Effective Foreign Assistance to try to make the case that such aid is highly useful and needs to be spared deep cuts. He chaired the Legislative Branch Appropriations Subcommittee in the 111th Congress (2009-10) and held fast against repeated Democratic pleas to find $61 million to fix the aging Capitol dome, citing budget constraints.

On Appropriations, his top priorities are the district’s large military and veterans’ facilities. In 2008, he slipped a provision into the military construction spending bill telling the Navy to start work on converting Mayport to a nuclear base. The Navy announced in February 2012 that it was suspending plans to move a Norfolk-based aircraft carrier to Mayport, but promised to shift a three-ship amphibious group to the area. Crenshaw also pushed successfully for new veterans’ cemeteries in Jacksonville and Sarasota, and he fought for expanded disability coverage for Gulf War veterans. He also has introduced legislation to provide savings accounts for people caring for family members with disabilities. Despite drawing more than 200 cosponsors, it has gained little traction.

Crenshaw made a bid for the senior Republican seat on the Budget Committee, raising nearly $1 million for other Republican candidates in the 2006 election to pay his dues. But the slot went to Paul Ryan of Wisconsin, who had less seniority than Crenshaw. He was not helped by his role in an earlier lobbying scandal that felled former Majority Leader Tom DeLay of Texas: Crenshaw had traveled with DeLay on a trip to South Korea in 2001, which had been paid for by lobbyists close to DeLay. Crenshaw also was on the wrong side of a pitched leadership battle for DeLay’s successor; he backed then-Rep. Roy Blunt of Missouri for the job, but John Boehner of Ohio emerged the winner. Nevertheless, he has remained in the good graces of leadership and was made a deputy whip.

Office Contact Information

MAIN OFFICE

(202) 225-2501

(202) 225-2504

RHOB- Rayburn House Office Building Room 2161
Washington, DC 20515-0904

MAIN OFFICE

(202) 225-2501

(202) 225-2504

RHOB- Rayburn House Office Building Room 2161
Washington, DC 20515-0904

DISTRICT OFFICE

(904) 598-0481

(904) 598-0486

1061 Riverside Avenue Suite 100
Jacksonville, FL 32204-4151

DISTRICT OFFICE

(904) 598-0481

(904) 598-0486

1061 Riverside Avenue Suite 100
Jacksonville, FL 32204-4151

CAMPAIGN OFFICE

(904) 281-0081

7235 Bonneval Road Suite 219
Jacksonville, FL 32256-7506

CAMPAIGN OFFICE

2358 Riverside Avenue Apt. 801
Jacksonville, FL 32204-4641

Staff

Sort by: Interest Name Title

Abortion

Catherine Skitsko
Legislative Assistant

Aerospace

Catherine Sadler
Legislative Assistant

Agriculture

Jennifer Debes
Legislative Director

Appropriations

Jennifer Debes
Legislative Director

Budget

Catherine Skitsko
Legislative Assistant

Campaign

Catherine Skitsko
Legislative Assistant

Education

Catherine Skitsko
Legislative Assistant

Jacquelyn Smith
District Director

Energy

Nicole Reppert
Legislative Assistant

Jacquelyn Smith
District Director

Environment

Jennifer Debes
Legislative Director

Finance

Jennifer Debes
Legislative Director

Foreign

Catherine Sadler
Legislative Assistant

Govt Ops

Catherine Skitsko
Legislative Assistant

Jacquelyn Smith
District Director

Health

Catherine Skitsko
Legislative Assistant

Homeland Security

Nicole Reppert
Legislative Assistant

Jacquelyn Smith
District Director

Housing

Nicole Reppert
Legislative Assistant

Immigration

Nicole Reppert
Legislative Assistant

Intelligence

Erica Striebel
Chief of Staff

Judiciary

Catherine Sadler
Legislative Assistant

Labor

Catherine Skitsko
Legislative Assistant

Medicare

Catherine Skitsko
Legislative Assistant

Military

Erica Striebel
Chief of Staff

Recreation

Jennifer Debes
Legislative Director

Science

Catherine Sadler
Legislative Assistant

Small Business

Jennifer Debes
Legislative Director

Social Security

Catherine Skitsko
Legislative Assistant

Tax

Jennifer Debes
Legislative Director

Technology

Catherine Sadler
Legislative Assistant

Telecommunications

Jennifer Debes
Legislative Director

Trade

Catherine Sadler
Legislative Assistant

Transportation

Nicole Reppert
Legislative Assistant

Jacquelyn Smith
District Director

Veterans

Jacquelyn Smith
District Director

Election Results

2012 GENERAL
Ander Crenshaw
Votes: 239,988
Percent: 76.13%
Jim Klauder
Votes: 75,236
Percent: 23.87%
2012 PRIMARY
Ander Crenshaw
Votes: 46,788
Percent: 71.86%
Bob Black
Votes: 11,816
Percent: 18.15%
Deborah Pueschel
Votes: 6,505
Percent: 9.99%
2010 GENERAL
Ander Crenshaw
Votes: 178,238
Percent: 77.21%
Troy Stanley
Votes: 52,540
Percent: 22.76%
2010 PRIMARY
Ander Crenshaw
Unopposed
2008 GENERAL
Ander Crenshaw
Votes: 224,112
Percent: 65.25%
Jay McGovern
Votes: 119,330
Percent: 34.75%
2008 PRIMARY
Ander Crenshaw
Unopposed
Prior Winning Percentages
2010 (77%), 2008 (65%); 2006 (70%); 2004 (100%); 2002 (100%); 2000 (67%)

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