Almanac A members-only database of searchable profiles compiled and adapted from the Almanac of American Politics

Biography

Elected: 2000, 7th term.

Born: April 13, 1944, Cambridge, MA

Home: San Diego

Education: U. of CA, B.A. 1964, U. of NC, M.A. 1968

Professional Career: Devel. assoc., KPBS Radio, 1980-82.; Exec. dir., Aaron Price Fellows, 1990-94.

Ethnicity: White/Caucasian

Religion: Jewish

Family: married (Steven) , 2 children

Susan Davis, a Democrat first elected in 2000, is a low-profile member who avoids the media spotlight and splashy speeches for C-SPAN viewers in favor of working quietly behind the scenes on issues that range from women’s health to allowing more voting by mail.

Davis grew up in Richmond, Calif., the daughter of a pediatrician. She graduated from the University of California, Berkeley and got a degree in social work at the University of North Carolina. After she married, she and her husband lived for a time in Japan while he served as an Air Force doctor during the Vietnam War. In 1972, they moved to San Diego. She was a producer for a local television station while also volunteering in civic groups, including as president of the local League of Women Voters. In 1983, she was elected to the San Diego school board. In 1994, she won the first of three terms in the California Assembly, where she chaired the Consumer Protection Committee.

Facing term limits, Davis in 2000 challenged U.S. Rep. Brian Bilbray, a Republican who had won three close elections. She portrayed him as too conservative for the district, though he took liberal and moderate positions on abortion rights and environmental protection. But Bilbray had voted with conservatives to impeach President Bill Clinton in 1998, and Davis attacked him as well for supporting bills that would deny citizenship to U.S.-born children of illegal immigrants. The AFL-CIO ran so much advertising on her behalf that Davis asked the union to stop. Daviswon 50%-46%, and has been reelected easily. Bilbray returned to Congress in June 2006 when he won a special election in the neighboring 50th District, though he lost his seat a second time in 2012.

In the House, Davis has a liberal voting record but tends to be more centrist on foreign policy. Assigned to the Armed Services and Education and the Workforce committees, she set herself priorities that have included higher military pay, increased aid for school districts with a large military presence, increased student loans, and incentives for better teachers. She angered organized labor by voting to give President George W. Bush wide authority to negotiate international trade deals, which unions opposed. She called the vote “agonizing,” but one that served the interests of a city that has been built on trade. Organized labor rescinded its endorsement of her. She joined with several other Democrats in 2012 to sponsor a bill ensuring that pregnant women are not forced out of jobs unnecessarily or denied reasonable job modifications that would allow them to continue working.

On Armed Services, she also has been active on women’s health issues. She sought to amend the fiscal 2012 defense authorization bill to cover abortions for military women who were victims of rape, but the Rules Committee blocked the move. She supported President Barack Obama’s troop buildup in Afghanistan in 2009, but cautioned that greater civilian support and involvement from U.S. allies was essential. In 2009, as chairman of Armed Services’ Personnel Subcommittee, she helped secure a higher military pay raise than Obama requested.

On the House Administration Committee, she proposed allowing universal voting by mail in federal elections. A consumer-related bill she introduced in September 2012 required Internet companies to disclose whether they are adjusting a product or service’s price based on the consumer’s personal information. Some companies use such information, including a consumer’s browser history, without their knowledge to raise or lower their prices.

Davis has been reelected with ease. She received an unusual amount of attention in 2012 when she filed a lawsuit to try to recover $160,000 in campaign funds that were siphoned by her one-time campaign treasurer, who pleaded guilty to stealing more than $7 million from Davis and other California lawmakers.

Office Contact Information

MAIN OFFICE

(202) 225-2040

(202) 225-2948

LHOB- Longworth House Office Building Room 1214
Washington, DC 20515-0553

MAIN OFFICE

(202) 225-2040

(202) 225-2948

LHOB- Longworth House Office Building Room 1214
Washington, DC 20515-0553

DISTRICT OFFICE

(619) 280-5353

(619) 280-5311

2700 Adams Avenue Suite 102
San Diego, CA 92116-1367

DISTRICT OFFICE

(619) 280-5353

(619) 280-5311

2700 Adams Avenue Suite 102
San Diego, CA 92116-1367

CAMPAIGN OFFICE

PO Box 84049
San Diego, CA 92138-4049

CAMPAIGN OFFICE

PO Box 84049
San Diego, CA 92138-4049

Staff

Sort by: Interest Name Title

Abortion

Annika Parks
Legislative Assistant

Animal Rights

Annika Parks
Legislative Assistant

Appropriations

Matt Weiner
Legislative Director

Budget

Matt Weiner
Legislative Director

Campaign

Lisa Sherman
Chief of Staff

Education

Andres Perez
Education Fellow

Energy

Matt Weiner
Legislative Director

Environment

Matt Weiner
Legislative Director

Govt Ops

Lisa Sherman
Chief of Staff

Grants

Cynthia Patton
Deputy Chief of Staff; Scheduler

Health

Matt Weiner
Legislative Director

Homeland Security

Annika Parks
Legislative Assistant

Immigration

Annika Parks
Legislative Assistant

Judiciary

Annika Parks
Legislative Assistant

Military

Dwrena Allen
Military Fellow

Ian Staples
Military Legislative Assistant

Rules

Lisa Sherman
Chief of Staff

Telecommunications

Matt Weiner
Legislative Director

Transportation

Annika Parks
Legislative Assistant

Women

Annika Parks
Legislative Assistant

Election Results

2012 GENERAL
Susan Davis
Votes: 164,825
Percent: 61.43%
Nick Popaditch
Votes: 103,482
Percent: 38.57%
2012 PRIMARY
Susan Davis
Votes: 70,462
Percent: 57.81%
Nick Popaditch
Votes: 51,423
Percent: 42.19%
2010 GENERAL
Susan Davis
Votes: 104,800
Percent: 62.26%
Michael Crimmins
Votes: 57,230
Percent: 34.0%
2010 PRIMARY
Susan Davis
Votes: 42,976
Percent: 100.0%
2008 GENERAL
Susan Davis
Votes: 161,315
Percent: 68.49%
Michael Crimmins
Votes: 64,658
Percent: 27.45%
2008 PRIMARY
Susan Davis
Votes: 43,171
Percent: 87.6%
Mike Copass
Votes: 6,113
Percent: 12.4%
Prior Winning Percentages
2010 (62%), 2008 (68%), 2006 (68%), 2004 (66%), 2002 (62%), 2000 (50%)

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