Almanac A members-only database of searchable profiles compiled and adapted from the Almanac of American Politics

Biography

Elected: 1992, 11th term.

Born: June 12, 1941, Boyle Heights, CA

Home: Los Angeles, CA

Education: CA State L.A., B.A. 1965

Ethnicity: Hispanic/Latino

Religion: Catholic

Family: Married (Edward T. Allard, III) , 2 children ; 2 stepchildren ; 7 grandchildren

Lucille Roybal-Allard, first elected in 1992, is the first Mexican-American woman to be elected to Congress, and, in 1999, became the first woman to chair the Congressional Hispanic Caucus. Immigration reform is one of her main priorities, along with social programs serving the poor.

Roybal-Allard grew up in the Los Angeles area, the daughter of longtime U.S. Rep. Edward Roybal, who was the first Latino to serve on the Los Angeles City Council. She dreamed of a show business career as a teenager and later worked as a department store clerk and for nonprofit organizations. After raising a family—two of her children are lawyers—she followed her father into politics when she was 45 years old. She was elected to the California Assembly in 1986. Six years later, she ran for a newly created House district that took in much of the Los Angeles area that her father had represented for 30 years. Her father retired in 1992, the year she ran for the House. Roybal-Allard won easily with 75% of the vote in the primary and 63% in the general election.

Roybal-Allard has compiled a solidly liberal voting record and has been among the Hispanic lawmakers pushing President Barack Obama to act boldly on immigration reform. One session between lawmakers and Obama domestic policy adviser Cecilia Munoz grew so testy that Roybal-Allard walked out, The Washington Post reported in April 2012. She called Obama’s reelection a mandate to focus on comprehensive immigration reform, predicting that opponents would revive “the usual scare tactics, misinformation, and misguided thinking. … But the truth is that the facts are on our side, the majority of Americans are on our side, and the momentum is on our side.”

Among the immigration-related bills she introduced in 2012 was a measure to ensure that children are not taken away from relatives due to a parent’s immigration status. When Senate Finance Committee Democrats proposed restrictions on illegal immigrants participating in health care programs as part of the 2010 health care overhaul, she joined a group of Hispanics who succeeded in modifying the provision. She is a co-sponsor of the DREAM Act, which would provide a path to legal immigration for college- or military-bound students. In the past, she also has pushed for in-state college tuition rates for illegal immigrants. In 2009, Roybal-Allard introduced a measure aimed at raising labor standards and protections for children of migrant farm workers to the same level as occupations outside of agriculture. Conservatives attacked the measure as an effort to give labor unions more power.

As a member of the Appropriations Committee, Roybal-Allard has championed a long-stalled effort to build a new federal courthouse in Los Angeles and has sought to upgrade the city’s infrastructure. She also got a bill signed into law to coordinate federal programs and research on underage drinking as well as to fund a media campaign on its dangers. Another of her recent successes was a bill enacted in 2008 that authorizes federal grants for newborn health screening for congenital, genetic, and metabolic disorders.

Roybal-Allard isn’t as close to House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi and her inner circle as other Democratic women from California, which sometimes limits her leverage in the House. In 2006, Roybal-Allard seconded the nomination of DemocratSteny Hoyer of Maryland for majority leader, indicating her support for Hoyer over Pelosi’s preferred candidate, Democrat John Murtha of Pennsylvania. However, Hoyer won the contest, so Roybal-Allard still has a friend or two in high places.

Redistricting in 2011 put 60% of Roybal-Allard’s constituents in the newly redrawn 40th District, and she chose to run for there. Under the state’s new top-two, all-party primary rules, she found herself with a Democratic challenger in the general election, college instructor David Sanchez. He held her to 59% of the vote, her lowest percentage ever, but she won reelection.

Office Contact Information

MAIN OFFICE

(202) 225-1766

(202) 226-0350

RHOB- Rayburn House Office Building Room 2330
Washington, DC 20515-0540

MAIN OFFICE

(202) 225-1766

(202) 226-0350

RHOB- Rayburn House Office Building Room 2330
Washington, DC 20515-0540

DISTRICT OFFICE

(202) 225-1766

(202) 226-0350

500 Citadel Drive Suite 320
Commerce, CA 90040

DISTRICT OFFICE

(323) 721-8790

(323) 721-8789

500 Citadel Drive Suite 320
Commerce, CA 90040-1572

CAMPAIGN OFFICE

(202) 225-1766

(202) 226-0350

880 West First Street Unit 618
Los Angeles, CA 90012

CAMPAIGN OFFICE

880 West First Street Unit 618
Los Angeles, CA 90012

EXPORT CONTACTS » *

Staff

Sort by: Interest Name Title

Abortion

Debbie Jessup
Senior Health Policy Advisor

Acquisitions

Victor Castillo
Chief of Staff

Aerospace

Adam Sachs
Legislative Aide

adam.sachs@mail.house.gov
(202) 225-1766

Agriculture

Debbie Jessup
Senior Health Policy Advisor

Animal Rights

Debbie Jessup
Senior Health Policy Advisor

Appropriations

Karen De Los Santos
Legislative Director

Victor Castillo
Chief of Staff

Banking

Victoria Coats
Legislative Assistant

Budget

Karen De Los Santos
Legislative Director

Campaign

Victor Castillo
Chief of Staff

Economics

Victoria Coats
Legislative Assistant

Education

Victoria Coats
Legislative Assistant

Environment

Adam Sachs
Legislative Aide

adam.sachs@mail.house.gov
(202) 225-1766

Family

Debbie Jessup
Senior Health Policy Advisor

Finance

Victoria Coats
Legislative Assistant

Foreign

Adam Sachs
Legislative Aide

adam.sachs@mail.house.gov
(202) 225-1766

Health

Debbie Jessup
Senior Health Policy Advisor

Homeland Security

Karen De Los Santos
Legislative Director

Housing

Victoria Coats
Legislative Assistant

Human Rights

Victor Castillo
Chief of Staff

Immigration

Karen De Los Santos
Legislative Director

Labor

Victoria Coats
Legislative Assistant

Medicare

Debbie Jessup
Senior Health Policy Advisor

Military

Adam Sachs
Legislative Aide

adam.sachs@mail.house.gov
(202) 225-1766

Native Americans

Debbie Jessup
Senior Health Policy Advisor

Rules

Victor Castillo
Chief of Staff

Science

Karen De Los Santos
Legislative Director

Small Business

Victoria Coats
Legislative Assistant

Tax

Karen De Los Santos
Legislative Director

Technology

Karen De Los Santos
Legislative Director

Telecommunications

Karen De Los Santos
Legislative Director

Trade

Adam Sachs
Legislative Aide

adam.sachs@mail.house.gov
(202) 225-1766

Transportation

Karen De Los Santos
Legislative Director

Welfare

Debbie Jessup
Senior Health Policy Advisor

Election Results

2012 GENERAL
Lucille Roybal-Allard
Votes: 73,940
Percent: 58.89%
David Sanchez
Votes: 51,613
Percent: 41.11%
2012 PRIMARY
Lucille Roybal-Allard
Votes: 16,596
Percent: 65.41%
David Sanchez
Votes: 8,777
Percent: 34.59%
2010 GENERAL
Lucille Roybal-Allard
Votes: 69,382
Percent: 77.23%
Wayne Miller
Votes: 20,457
Percent: 22.77%
2010 PRIMARY
Lucille Roybal-Allard
Votes: 14,309
Percent: 70.75%
David Sanchez
Votes: 5,917
Percent: 29.25%
2008 GENERAL
Lucille Roybal-Allard
Votes: 98,503
Percent: 77.09%
Christopher Balding
Votes: 29,266
Percent: 22.91%
2008 PRIMARY
Lucille Roybal-Allard
Votes: 12,622
Percent: 99.98%
Prior Winning Percentages
2010 (77%), 2008 (77%), 2006 (77%), 2004 (74%), 2002 (74%), 2000 (85%), 1998 (87%), 1996 (82%), 1994 (81%), 1992 (63%)

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