Almanac A members-only database of searchable profiles compiled and adapted from the Almanac of American Politics

Biography

Elected: 2010, 2nd term.

Born: November 27, 1958, Rock Springs, WY

Home: Flagstaff, AZ

Education: Creighton U., B.S. 1981, D.D.S. 1985.

Professional Career: Owner, dental practice.

Ethnicity: White/Caucasian

Religion: Roman Catholic

Family: Married (Maude) , 3 children

Republican Paul Gosar unseated one-term 1st District Democratic Rep. Ann Kirkpatrick in 2010 with the backing of the national GOP glitterati, including former vice presidential nominee Sarah Palin. After switching to the more Republican-friendly 4th District, he overcame a fierce primary challenge on the right to prevail again in 2012.

Gosar (GO sar) grew up in Pinedale, Wyo., a town of fewer than 2,000 residents near the headwaters of the Green River. He was the first of 10 children in the “Fighting Gosars,” a family he describes as close and also “rough and rowdy.” He and his brothers were altar boys in their Roman Catholic parish in nearby Rock Springs, but they weren’t beyond a little mischief, such as sneaking swigs of wine in the sacristy. Gosar’s father, a geologist with Belco Petroleum and Union Pacific, was often away working on rigs, and an uncle, who was a dentist, stepped in as a role model during those absences.

Gosar went on to study dentistry at Creighton University with the expectation that he would return to Wyoming to go into practice with his uncle. His father, however, advised him to seek a more vibrant economy. “My dad took me aside and said, ‘I don’t think the right time is here. I think the minerals, the oil, and gas are going to crash,” Gosar recalled. After receiving his D.D.S. in 1985, Gosar landed in Flagstaff, Ariz. Appealing to a local banker for financing to launch his practice in 1985, Gosar says he emphasized his frugality, vowing to eat nothing but peanut-butter-and-jelly sandwiches until his business was established. He married an antiques dealer, and the couple had three children.

When he decided to challenge Kirkpatrick in the 2010 election, Gosar said he was motivated by his contempt for the health care overhaul that the Democratic Congress passed in December 2009. Kirkpatrick had been in office for one term, having won the seat in 2008 after scandal-plagued Republican Rep. Rick Renzi resigned. In his campaign, Gosar sharply criticized her votes for President Barack Obama’s agenda in Congress, including the health care bill. He also took a hard line on immigration, in contrast to Kirkpatrick, touting his endorsement from Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio, who is well-known nationally for his aggressive pursuit of illegal immigrants in Arizona. Kirkpatrick refused to follow many other Democrats in tight reelection contests who distanced themselves from the administration. Her ads highlighted her support for Obama’s initiatives and cast Gosar as an irresponsible millionaire who was late paying business and property taxes 12 times.

Going into the fall contest, Kirkpatrick had $870,000 to spend, compared with Gosar’s $49,000. But he received help from the American Dental Association and other medical groups that opposed the health care law. He also was boosted by a prevailing trend of Republican expansion in suburban, high-growth areas in the district, and he got help from tea party activists. The national GOP wave, along with Palin’s endorsement, helped to seal his 50%-44% victory.

In Washington, Gosar immediately made clear his contempt for Washington’s typical ways. He told a reporter that the formal swearing-in ceremony on the House floor felt awkward, and that Congress should have held a barbecue with legislators serving people. He was given a seat on the Oversight and Government Reform Committee and became one of the first House members to call on Attorney General Eric Holder to resign in 2011 because of the failed “Operation Fast and Furious,” a program that facilitated the sale of thousands of weapons to Mexican drug cartels. In an interview with The Daily Caller, he accused Holder and other government officials of possibly being “accessories to murder” for their roles. On the Natural Resources Committee, he got a bill into law aimed at eliminating red tape on a dam project spanning the Coconino and Tonto national forests and won House passage of a bill that would swap 2,400 acres of Tonto forest land to make way for a new $4 billion copper mine. He also spoke out against the administration’s rules in 2012 for managing national forests and grasslands, saying they left constituents “vulnerable to catastrophic wildfires.” He unsuccessfully tried to amend legislation on the House floor to abolish Davis-Bacon Act requirements that federal contractors pay a prevailing union wage, calling them onerous for businesses.

Concerned over his reelection prospects, and faced with new, post-2010 redistricting lines that favored Democrats, Gosar in January 2012 announced he would move out of his Flagstaff home and run in the more Republican-leaning 4th District. (Kirkpatrick would go on to win back the 1st District seat.) Pinal County Sheriff Paul Babeu, a hard-liner on illegal immigration, initially was considered the front-runner, but his campaign’s momentum halted when a former boyfriend (and illegal immigrant) accused him of threatening deportation to keep their relationship quiet. Babeu came out as gay but denied the allegations, and he eventually ran again for sheriff.

That left Gosar with two challengers in the August 2012 GOP primary, state Sen. Ron Gould of Lake Havasu City and radio station owner Rick Murphy of Bullhead City. Gould, regarded as one of the Arizona legislature’s most conservative members, waged an aggressive campaign against Gosar, attacking him for being the only GOP member of Arizona’s House delegation to support the 2011 deal to raise the nation’s debt limit. The anti-tax group Club for Growth contributed heavily to Gould’s campaign, but the American Dental Association’s political action committee countered with help for a fellow dentist. Gosar won with 51% to Gould’s 32% and Murphy’s 17%. Gosar had far less trouble in November dispatching largely unknown Democratic businessman Johnnie Robinson and two minor-party candidates.

Office Contact Information

MAIN OFFICE

(202) 225-2315

(202) 226-9739

CHOB- Cannon House Office Building Room 504
Washington, DC 20515-0304

MAIN OFFICE

(202) 225-2315

(202) 226-9739

CHOB- Cannon House Office Building Room 504
Washington, DC 20515-0304

DISTRICT OFFICE

(202) 225-2315

(202) 226-9739

122 North Cortez Street Suite 104
Prescott, AZ 86301-3022

DISTRICT OFFICE

(928) 445-1683

(928) 445-3414

122 North Cortez Street Suite 104
Prescott, AZ 86301-3022

DISTRICT OFFICE

(928) 445-1683

220 North 4th Street
Kingman, AZ 86401-5817

DISTRICT OFFICE

(202) 225-2315

(202) 226-9739

220 North 4th Street
Kingman, AZ 86401-5817

DISTRICT OFFICE

(202) 225-2315

(202) 226-9739

One City Plaza Suite 161
Yuma, AZ 85354-1436

DISTRICT OFFICE

(928) 445-1683

One City Plaza Suite 161
Yuma, AZ 85354-1436

DISTRICT OFFICE

(202) 225-2315

(202) 226-9739

6499 South Kings Ranch Road Unit 4
Gold Canyon, AZ 85118-2920

DISTRICT OFFICE

(480) 882-2697

6499 South Kings Ranch Road Unit 4
Gold Canyon, AZ 85118-2920

CAMPAIGN OFFICE

PO Box 2967
Prescott, AZ 86302

CAMPAIGN OFFICE

(202) 225-2315

(202) 226-9739

PO Box 2967
Prescott, AZ 86302

EXPORT CONTACTS » *

Staff

Sort by: Interest Name Title

Agriculture

Jeff Small
Legislative Director

jeff.small@mail.house.gov
(202) 225-2315

Budget

Jeff Small
Legislative Director

jeff.small@mail.house.gov
(202) 225-2315

Trevor Pearson
Senior Legislative Assistant

Commerce

Jeff Small
Legislative Director

jeff.small@mail.house.gov
(202) 225-2315

Energy

Jeff Small
Legislative Director

jeff.small@mail.house.gov
(202) 225-2315

Environment

Jeff Small
Legislative Director

jeff.small@mail.house.gov
(202) 225-2315

Govt Ops

Trevor Pearson
Senior Legislative Assistant

Health

Trevor Pearson
Senior Legislative Assistant

Immigration

Jeff Small
Legislative Director

jeff.small@mail.house.gov
(202) 225-2315

Native Americans

Jeff Small
Legislative Director

jeff.small@mail.house.gov
(202) 225-2315

Small Business

Jeff Small
Legislative Director

jeff.small@mail.house.gov
(202) 225-2315

Tax

Jeff Small
Legislative Director

jeff.small@mail.house.gov
(202) 225-2315

Trade

Trevor Pearson
Senior Legislative Assistant

Transportation

Trevor Pearson
Senior Legislative Assistant

Election Results

2014 GENERAL
Paul Gosar
Votes: 121,020
Percent: 69.95%
Mike Weisser
Votes: 44,680
Percent: 25.83%
2012 GENERAL
Paul Gosar
Votes: 162,907
Percent: 66.83%
Johnnie Robinson
Votes: 69,154
Percent: 28.37%
2012 PRIMARY
Paul Gosar
Votes: 40,033
Percent: 51.35%
Ron Gould
Votes: 24,617
Percent: 31.57%
Rick Murphy
Votes: 13,315
Percent: 17.08%
2010 GENERAL
Paul Gosar
Votes: 112,816
Percent: 49.72%
Ann Kirkpatrick-OLD
Votes: 99,233
Percent: 43.73%
Nicole Patti
Votes: 14,869
Percent: 6.55%
2010 PRIMARY
Paul Gosar
Votes: 21,941
Percent: 30.73%
Sydney Hay
Votes: 16,328
Percent: 22.87%
Bradley Beauchamp
Votes: 11,356
Percent: 15.91%
Russell Bowers
Votes: 10,552
Percent: 14.78%
Steve Mehta
Votes: 5,846
Percent: 8.19%
Prior Winning Percentages
2010 (50%)

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