Almanac A members-only database of searchable profiles compiled and adapted from the Almanac of American Politics

Biography

Elected: 1986, term expires 2016, 5th term.

Born: August 29, 1936, Panama Canal Zone

Home: Phoenix

Education: U.S. Naval Academy, B.S. 1958, Natl. War Col., 1973-74

Professional Career: Dir., Navy Senate Liaison Ofc., 1977–81.

Ethnicity: White/Caucasian

Religion: Episcopalian

Family: married (Cindy) , 7 children

John McCain, Arizona’s senior senator, was once the Democrats’ ideal Republican – fiercely independent and unafraid to cross the aisle to work on issues such as campaign finance and immigration. Since losing to Barack Obama in the 2008 presidential race, however, McCain has rebranded himself as the GOP’s chief critic of Obama’s national security policies, using his celebrity status to espouse a hawkish approach in the Middle East and elsewhere.

McCain was born in the Canal Zone, the son and grandson of Navy admirals. (His married-to-the-military mother, Roberta McCain, at age 96, was one of his hardest-working campaign supporters; she danced at the podium at the Republican National Convention celebrating his nomination.) McCain graduated from the Naval Academy, fifth from the bottom of his class academically but high in demerits, and trained to be a fighter pilot. He volunteered for service in Vietnam, and flew ground-attack aircraft from carriers at sea. In July 1967, he was severely injured in a flight-deck explosion on the carrier USS Forrestal. McCain could have returned home but refused. He continued to fly bombing runs over North Vietnam. That October, on his 23rd bombing mission, his A-4E Skyhawk was shot down by a missile, and McCain ejected from the plane, breaking both of his arms and a leg in a fall into Truc Bach Lake near Hanoi. After pulling him from the water, his North Vietnamese “rescuers” crushed one of his shoulders with a rifle butt, bayoneted him, then refused him medical treatment during his stay at a prison dubbed the Hanoi Hilton by U.S. soldiers.

He spent the next five and a half years in prisoner-of-war camps, most of it in suffering as a result of repeated torture by his Communist captors. He spent two of those years in solitary confinement. That chapter of McCain’s life is recounted in Robert Timberg’s The Nightingale’s Song and in McCain’s 1999 best-seller Faith of My Fathers. When he was offered release because of his father’s rank, he refused to be let out ahead of those who had been imprisoned longer, and he returned to the United States in March 1973 with other POWs.

McCain recovered in military hospitals, and despite intensive physical therapy, suffered permanent injuries, including restricted movement of his arms. On top of the many medals and commendations he received, his heroism was rewarded with a final assignment in a high-profile, noncombat role as the Navy’s liaison to the Senate in 1977. McCain says the job launched his career in politics. He became close to several senators, including Republicans John Tower of Texas and William Cohen of Maine and Democrat Gary Hart of Colorado. On the personal front, McCain’s first marriage failed. In 1980, he remarried, to Cindy Lou Hensley, the wealthy daughter of a beer distributor from Phoenix. Two years later, he ran for an open House seat in Arizona. Attacked as an outsider, he responded, “The longest place I ever lived in was Hanoi.” He won a four-way primary, 32%-26%, and then the general election in November. In 1986, he easily defeated former Arizona state legislator Democrat Richard Kimball to win the Senate seat of conservative icon Barry Goldwater, who was retiring.

McCain became chairman of the Armed Services Committee in 2015, a perch from which he said he hoped to shape his legacy as someone who played "a significant role in defeating the forces of radical Islam that want to destroy America." He told The Associated Press in January 2015, "You will see, probably, the busiest Senate Armed Services Committee that you've ever seen." He promised to address how the Pentagon is structured as a followup to the 1986 Goldwater-Nichols Department of Defense Reorganization Act, which his role model Goldwater cosponsored. But above all else, he pushed aggressively for an expanded U.S. military presence in Iraq and Syria. He had caused a stir in 2013 when he ventured into the latter country to meet with opposition leaders whom he hoped could topple Bashar al-Assad; 12 of the 15 Syrian commanders with whom he met subsequently died. “We are probably in the most serious period of turmoil in our lifetime,” he told The Washington Post.

He flashed his infamous temper at a group of protestors who interrupted the testimony of former Secretary of State Henry Kissinger. "Get out of here, you lowlife scum!" he barked in an exchange that immediately went viral. Bringing in luminaries such as Kissinger was part of McCain's mission to try to educate his more-junior colleagues about America's historic role in the world. He also made clear he would hold more overseas fact-finding trips. "I think John's legacy is that he never quits," Vice President Joe Biden, a longtime Senate colleague, told the AP.

The earlier Republican gains in the 2010 elections appeared to whet McCain’s inclinations toward partisanship, leaving his onetime Democratic allies disappointed. “I just hope he goes back to his roots,” Senate Majority Whip Dick Durbin, D-Ill., told The New York Times in July 2012. Opposing a Democratic cybersecurity bill, McCain introduced competing legislation arguing that standards for electrical grids and other infrastructure should be left up to the private sector. On international issues, he called for airstrikes on Syrian forces attempting to put down a popular rebellion, and he blasted the Obama administration’s approach as “a feckless foreign policy that abandons American leadership.” He also criticized the administration’s handling of the attack on the U.S. consulate in Libya and called for an active U.S. role in brokering Middle East peace in the wake of Israel’s fight with Hamas in Gaza in fall 2012.

When Obama won reelection in 2012 and considered nominating United Nations Ambassador Susan Rice as secretary of State, McCain and his close ally Sen. Lindsey Graham of South Carolina emerged as Rice’s most full-throated critics. McCain called her “unqualified,” citing her public statements about the September terrorist attack in Benghazi and prompting an angry Obama to retort, “If Senator McCain and Senator Graham and others want to go after somebody, they should go after me.” The senators, however, won the battle when Rice withdrew her name in December. The two senators next began raising concerns about the fitness of their former Senate colleague, Nebraska’s Chuck Hagel, to become Defense secretary, questioning his loyalty to Israel and willingness to intervene militarily overseas. They were unable to stop Hagel from being confirmed. Despite his desire to remain Armed Services’ ranking Republican, McCain conceded to term limits and yielded in January 2013 to Oklahoma’s James Inhofe. His ubiquitous presence on television talk shows, however, indicated his influence would remain strong.

McCain did show signs of his old willingness to stand up to his party when he publicly tore into a group of conservative House Republicans in July 2012 for targeting Huma Abedin in their quest to identify allies of the Muslim Brotherhood in the Obama administration. Abedin, a Muslim, was a top aide to Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton and also the wife of former New York Democratic Rep. Anthony Weiner. Though he endorsed Republican Mitt Romney’s presidential bid against Obama, several political commentators judged his advocacy on the campaign trail to be lukewarm. McCain also questioned whether a super PAC backing Romney may have provided a conduit for foreign money to enter the presidential race. And McCain rebuked a proposal from Republican strategists – which was discussed but never unveiled -- to launch a racially-tinged attack on Obama for his ties to the controversial Rev. Jeremiah Wright, an issue he had declined to raise four years earlier despite pleas from fellow Republicans. (McCain’s outspoken daughter, Meghan, an MSNBC commentator and blogger, drew attention during the campaign for squabbling with Romney’s rival, former House Speaker Newt Gingrich.)

For all of the attention he now commands, McCain kept a low profile during his early years in Congress. He was a strong supporter of the Reagan administration and surprised some by opposing the president’s dispatch of troops to Lebanon in 1982, arguing they were too few to be effective and too vulnerable to attack. Later, he backed President George H.W. Bush’s war in the Persian Gulf in 1990 and his decision not to oust Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein. In the 1990s, he worked with Massachusetts Sen. John Kerry, a Democrat and also a decorated Vietnam veteran, to end the trade embargo on Vietnam, and pressed for establishing diplomatic relations. He supported air strikes against Serbia in 1999 but criticized the Clinton administration for ruling out ground troops in Bosnia and for not using “all necessary force” against the Serbs.

McCain strongly supported President George W. Bush in the war on terrorism after September 11 and in his later decision to go to war with Iraq. McCain repeatedly pushed for more ground troops in Afghanistan and signed a letter urging that Iraq be the next target. He called for a special commission to investigate intelligence failures before the terrorist attacks. The final version of the law provided, at the insistence of relatives of 9/11 casualties, that McCain and Richard Shelby of Alabama get a veto over appointees to the commission. When Bush decided to invade Iraq in 2003, McCain continually pushed for a larger army and more troops to get the job done. He clashed frequently with Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld. McCain finally concluded that the administration’s handling of the war “will go down as one of the worst” mistakes in U.S. military history.

McCain built a reputation in Congress as someone who refused to engage in business as usual, making him a popular figure outside of Washington. But at one time, engaging in business as usual nearly ended his career. In the mid-1980s, McCain was one of the Keating Five senators investigated for allegedly pressuring regulators on behalf of Charles Keating’s Arizona savings and loan. Ultimately, he was cited for exercising bad judgment for attempting to influence regulators overseeing Keating’s thrift. Vindicated by his reelection in 1992, McCain reinvented himself as a reformer.

When Republicans won control of Congress two years later, McCain sought out Democrat Russ Feingold of Wisconsin, who had a bill to clamp down on campaign finance abuses. For the next several years, the McCain-Feingold bills went through several transformations. Key features included prohibitions on soft money—the large, unregulated contributions to political parties that were ripe for abuse—and limits on advertising by independent organizations within 60 days of an election. The changes were fiercely opposed as an infringement on free speech and as a threat to the Republican Party by the powerful Mitch McConnell of Kentucky, who used threats of filibusters to prevent the bill from coming to a vote. McCain threatened to tie up the Senate in early 2001 unless Majority Leader Trent Lott, R-Miss., set aside time for debate on the issue. In March 2001, after two weeks of civilized but spirited debate, during which McCain and Feingold fended off several poison-pill amendments, the legislation passed April 2 on a 59-41 vote. The House passed its version in February 2002, and the bill became law.

For years, it withstood multiple court challenges. But then in January 2010, the Supreme Court, reversing earlier precedents, struck down a key reform when it ruled in Citizens United vs. Federal Election Commission that curbs on political spending by corporations are an unconstitutional infringement on free speech. The 2002 law had banned the broadcast, cable, or satellite transmission of election messages paid for by corporations or labor unions from their general funds in the 30 days before a presidential primary and in the 60 days before the general elections. “I think there will be scandals associated with the worst decision of the United States Supreme Court in the 21st century,” McCain said in June 2012. He cited the justices’ inability to understand the realities of campaigning and added, “I just wish one of them had run for county sheriff.” But he refused to join Democrats in supporting the DISCLOSE Act aimed at correcting Citizens United, calling it “closer to a clever attempt at political gamesmanship than actual reform.”

Another of his legislative crusades was a war on earmarks, the practice among lawmakers of slipping high-dollar projects into bills to benefit a particular congressional district or state. Each year, McCain highlighted the pork-barrel spending he found in the appropriations bills, to the growing irritation of his colleagues in both parties, who were accustomed to using earmarks to curry favor with voters back home. But eventually McCain’s lonely campaign was joined by conservatives in the House, and both chambers subsequently adopted an earmark ban.

McCain’s generally conservative voting record has as many quirks as the man himself. He supported funding of embryonic stem cell research, in opposition to most other Republicans. With liberal Democrat Kerry, he proposed fuel efficiency standards of 36 miles per gallon for cars and light trucks by 2015. And with independent Sen. Joe Lieberman of Connecticut, he co-authored a bill to reduce carbon dioxide emissions. McCain opposed the constitutional amendment to ban same-sex marriage as “antithetical in every way to the core philosophy of Republicans” to respect states’ rights to govern themselves.

His biggest act of ideological heresy came on the issue of immigration. “The truth is, border enforcement alone does not work,” McCain said, as most conservatives were pursuing tougher enforcement strategies. He opposed Arizona’s Proposition 200, which would cut off public benefits to illegal immigrants, arguing that it would“delay, possibly derail, the search for a solution.” In 2005, McCain and liberal Sen. Edward Kennedy of Massachusetts sponsored an immigration bill that gave illegal immigrants a path to legalization, allowing them to obtain two three-year visas and then “get in the back of the line” of legal immigrants. “Some Americans believe we must find all these millions, round them up, and send them back to the countries they came from. I don’t know how you do that. And I don’t know why you would want to,” McCain said. But a comprehensive bill failed in 2006 and again in 2007.

When immigration resurfaced as a front-burner issue after the 2012 elections, he joined a bipartisan group that crafted a proposal. That required re-establishing a good working relationship with New York Sen. Charles Schumer, one of the few Democrats whose ubiquitous media presence rivals that of McCain's. Schumer told The New Yorker that McCain came to him after they worked on a deal to protect the Senate's filibuster rules. "He said, ‘You know? You’re a much different person than I thought you were,’” Schumer recalled.

The so-called "Gang of Eight" got a comprehensive bill that combined a path to citizenship for illegal immigrants with extremely tough border-security measures through the Senate in 2013, but the Republican-controlled House refused to take up that or any other broad-ranging measure. When a disgusted Obama issued an executive order on immigration in November 2014, McCain complained it was "a cynical action that means that the president isn't that interested in comprehensive reform. He's only interested in placating his base."

McCain’s quest for the presidency began with the 2000 election. In 1999, he decided to skip the caucuses in dovish and ethanol-loving Iowa (McCain had long denounced ethanol subsidies as pork barrel spending) to concentrate on the primary in New Hampshire, where he traveled around in his “Straight Talk Express” bus. At first, only a few reporters traveled with him and crowds were sparse. But McCain struck a chord. To increasingly larger and more enthusiastic crowds, he told his personal story in self-deprecating terms, and pledged, “I will never tell you a lie.” He talked about defense and foreign-policy issues—the only candidate to spend much time doing so—and invariably called for campaign finance regulation. McCain did not have much support from his colleagues, and The Arizona Republic wrote editorials warning of McCain’s “volcanic” temper. But the strength of feeling among his ever-larger crowds was real, and on Feb. 1, McCain beat George W. Bush by an impressive 49%-30%. Suddenly he became, if not the front-runner, at least the front-runner’s most serious opponent.

From there, the “Straight Talk Express” had mixed success. It went to South Carolina, where both the Republican establishment and Christian conservatives lined up with Bush. The campaigning got negative, but what hurt even more was McCain’s failure to win over self-identified Republicans. His emphasis on campaign finance regulation and his criticisms of Bush’s tax cuts for giving too much to the rich helped with independents but sounded like enemy talk to Republicans. On Feb. 18, Bush won 53%-42% in South Carolina, in what turned out to be a decisive victory. The race continued, with McCain running way ahead of Bush among independents, but way behind among Republicans in Southern states. McCain’s most striking win was in Michigan that February, where he prevailed 50%-43%, among an atypical electorate: Seventeen percent of Republican primary voters were self-identified Democrats, 35% were independents, and only a minority were Republicans. On Super Tuesday, March 7, McCain won in Massachusetts, Connecticut, Rhode Island, and Vermont. But he lost in New York, Ohio, and California. He suspended his campaign in March and two months later grudgingly endorsed Bush.

Four years later, as Bush headed into his 2004 reelection campaign, McCain was a major national figure, with high positive ratings among Republicans and very low negatives among Democrats. Always enchanted with him, the press gave McCain plenteous coverage. As Kerry, his fellow Vietnam veteran, clinched the Democratic nomination in March 2004, there was speculation that he would ask McCain to be his vice presidential nominee. After some days of speculation, McCain firmly rejected the idea. “I am a pro-life, deficit-hawk, free-trade Republican,” he said. Subsequently, the Bush and McCain camps made peace. But he also maintained his relationship with fellow vet Kerry. When the Swift Boat Veterans for Truth ads appeared against Kerry, McCain called them “dishonorable” and said they should be dropped from the air.

As the 2008 presidential contest neared, McCain voiced more frequently and fervently his long-standing opposition to abortion rights. Even so, many conservatives were not enthusiastic about McCain, given his stands on campaign finance, immigration, and carbon dioxide emissions. Their skepticism doomed McCain’s early strategy in 2007, which was to campaign as the next-in-line Republican for the presidential nomination. He fell behind New York’s Rudolph Giuliani in the polls, and he fell far short of his fundraising goals, raising just $13.6 million in the first quarter of 2007, behind Giuliani and Massachusetts’ Romney. By late June, the McCain campaign was broke. Its opulent headquarters closed, and the campaign’s top managers were fired, replaced with McCain stalwart Rick Davis and Bush-Cheney veteran Steve Schmidt. Backed into a corner, McCain adopted the campaign strategy that some of the best consultants rely on: Campaign on what you believe in. And, he had a backup strategy that even the worst consultants are ashamed to advance: Wait for all the other candidates’ strategies to fail.

They both worked. After a spring trip to Iraq, McCain commented in July 2007 that he was convinced the troop surge strategy was working and praised the outcome despite near-universal skepticism in the press. In September, he launched his “No Surrender” tour. In the GOP primary debates, McCain was treated respectfully and uncritically by his opponents, while he was quick to jab at any who expressed skepticism about the surge. Meanwhile, his opponents’ strategies started to fail. Romney’s poll numbers were stalled at about 30%. Tennessee’s Fred Thompson took months to announce he was running and then seemed strangely unenergetic. Judging that the field was stacked against him in early contests, New York’s Giuliani decided to wait until the Florida primary. Only Mike Huckabee, the former minister and Arkansas governor, exceeded expectations, running second in the Iowa straw poll in August 2007 and first, ahead of the free-spending Romney, in the Iowa caucuses on Jan. 3, 2008. As in 2000, McCain had written off dovish Iowa. He focused on New Hampshire, campaigning hard there. On Jan. 8, he beat Romney, who owned a vacation home in New Hampshire, 37%-32%. “Mac is back,” chanted the crowd on Election Night.

Next up was Michigan, where Romney had grown up and where his father was governor 40 years before. Romney promised to bring back jobs in the state’s important automobile industry, while McCain stated bluntly that many jobs would never return. With fewer crossovers than in 2000, Michigan gave Romney 39% and McCain 30%. From Michigan, it was on to South Carolina, where McCain had lost decisively in 2000. This was the one real four-way Republican contest in 2008. McCain, with 33%, came out ahead of Huckabee, with 30%. Thompson undoubtedly took votes away from fellow Southerner Huckabee and got 16%. Romney was fourth with 15%.

In critical and always baffling Florida on Jan. 29, GOP Gov. Charlie Crist delivered a surprise endorsement of McCain. The result was a 36%-31% victory for McCain over Romney. A few days later on Super Tuesday, Feb. 5, McCain effectively sewed up the nomination, winning absolute majorities (his first) in New York, New Jersey, and Connecticut and winning a 1% victory over Huckabee in Missouri. He racked up victories in states as diverse as California, Illinois, Oklahoma, and Delaware. Two days later, Romney withdrew. Huckabee stayed in the race for another month. By late spring, McCain had consolidated the Republican base, but it was smaller than in 2004, and not sufficiently motivated to come anywhere close to matching the fundraising feats of Democrat Barack Obama. Working against McCain were Bush’s low job rating, an increasing Democratic advantage in party identification, doubts about the course of the economy, the continuing unpopularity of the war in Iraq, and the enthusiasm among young and black voters for Obama. Another factor was McCain’s own campaign finance law. Obama eschewed federal funding and was able to massively outspend McCain, who had little choice but to take public financing.

Given these circumstances, it’s perhaps surprising that McCain made a contest of it at all and that he was actually leading during part of the fall campaign. He sought to portray himself, more than Obama, as an agent of change. After Obama chose 36-year Senate veteran Joe Biden of Delaware as his running mate, McCain chose the two-year governor of Alaska, Sarah Palin. Her initial appearance in Ohio and her speech before the Republican National Convention sparked great enthusiasm among the Republican base, and the campaign was finally able to muster volunteer and fundraising efforts competitive with Obama’s. For about two weeks, the McCain-Palin ticket actually led Obama-Biden by narrow margins. But it became apparent that Palin was unprepared for the rigors of a national campaign. News articles depicted her as lacking knowledge about a range of issues, and her rambling interviews and verbal gaffes provided fodder for Saturday Night Live and late-night comics. She also was mercurial in temperament, clashing with McCain’s aides and eventually overshadowing the senator’s own campaign.

Then, on Sept. 15, Lehman Brothers went into bankruptcy, and a financial crisis ensued. The same day, McCain said, “The fundamentals of our economy are strong.” Four days later, Treasury Secretary Henry Paulson and Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke called for a $700 billion rescue of the financial markets. Obama’s campaign scoffed at McCain’s “strong” comment, surged in the polls, and never relinquished the lead after that. On Sept. 24, McCain announced he was suspending his campaign, pulling his television ads, and returning to the Capitol to work on the financial industry bill. He said he might not appear at the first presidential debate scheduled two days later. Obama coolly observed that a president has to tend to more than one thing at a time, and the debate went off. When the House initially rejected the financial rescue on Sept. 29, McCain was blamed for not bringing along a sufficient number of House Republicans.

In the rhetoric war, McCain attacked Obama sharply on taxes, energy, and other issues. But he also subtly raised questions about Obama’s character, asking voters whether they knew the “real Barack Obama” and could trust him. When fringe activists started loudly protesting that Obama might be a socialist or a terrorist and perhaps was not even an American citizen, McCain modulated his comments, saying on Oct. 10, “I want to be president of the United States and obviously I do not want Senator Obama to be, but I have to tell you, I have to tell you he is a decent person, and a person that you do not have to be scared of as president of the United States.” He criticized Obama for saying he wanted to “spread the wealth around,” but when asked in a debate about the economy, McCain fell back on his determination to stop spending on earmarks, which could hardly be viewed as a comprehensive economic agenda.

In the final days of the campaign, Obama avoided mistakes. He won 53%-46%, the best Democratic percentage since 1964. Obama got 95% support from African-American voters, and he won 66%-32% among voters under age 30. Among those older than 30, McCain lost by only 50%-49%. On Election Night, McCain made a gracious concession speech, saying, “Senator Obama has achieved a great thing for himself and for his country.”

After the election, McCain continued to weigh in on major issues, but he took a more conservative line than he had in earlier years. He called for a payroll tax cut in January 2009 and opposed the Democrats’ $787 billion economic stimulus bill. In April 2009, despite his support of past legislation to reduce carbon emissions, he called the Democrats’ cap-and-trade bill irresponsible and said the plan to auction all emissions credits was “bad economic policy that would cost businesses billions of dollars and allow for little to no transition into a low carbon system.”

McCain remained heavily involved in defense issues. He worked with Chairman Carl Levin, D-Mich., to support Defense Secretary Robert Gates’ decision in 2009 to end production of the F-22 fighter. And, after his many criticisms of Bush’s handling of the Iraq war, he gave the former president credit for ending it well. “Though most Democrats still cannot bear to admit it, the war in Iraq is ending successfully because the surge worked,” he told The Wall Street Journal. McCain supported Obama’s decisions to send more troops to Afghanistan in March and December 2009 but criticized the president’s call for troop reductions starting by July 2011. He also spoke out strongly against repeal of the ban on openly gay military personnel.

McCain’s positive image with the public had been built on his tendency toward political independence, and that image acquired chinks in 2010. He disappointed many of his longtime supporters when, faced with a primary challenge in his reelection, McCain backed away from some of his earlier stances and told Newsweek in April 2010, “I never considered myself a maverick.” One of his most telling changes of heart was on immigration. McCain retreated from his earlier out-front support for a path to citizenship and other elements of a bipartisan approach to illegal immigration, saying bluntly that voters had spoken and that the border must be protected first, before any comprehensive bill would be passed. Most Republican primary voters in Arizona and practically all talk radio hosts there strongly opposed legalization as a form of amnesty, and McCain no doubt was angling to eliminate an easy line of attack for his primary opponent, conservative talk radio host J.D. Hayworth, a former House member. In March 2009, McCain snipped to a Hispanic group, “You people made your choice during the election,” a reference to exit polls that showed he lost Latinos to Obama 67%-31%. He also supported Arizona’s controversial new law allowing police to look into the immigration status of people stopped for other reasons.

Known for a bombastic streak during his House years, Hayworth chortled over McCain’s “double talk express” and dubbed him “weenie of the week.” But Hayworth had his own problems. Before losing his House seat—including usually Republican Scottsdale—to Democrat Harry Mitchell in 2006, he had received contributions from disgraced lobbyist Jack Abramoff. With his long Senate career on the line, McCain campaigned nonstop and beat Hayworth in the August primary 56%-32%, a solid victory but not an overwhelming one. A third candidate who claimed tea party affiliation got 12%. In the general election campaign, Democratic nominee Rodney Glassman, the former vice mayor of Tucson, could attract little funding in a year many other Democratic Senate candidates were struggling, and he never became well-known in the Phoenix market. McCain won by 59%-35%.

In January 2015, McCain said he was inclined to run for a sixth term in 2016, when he would be 80. "I still think I have a lot to do," he told the AP. However, he subsequently backed off a bit, saying only he was "leaning heavily toward running." His comments came as David McIntosh, leader of the influential anti-tax group Club for Growth, said it was "carefully" assessing the Arizona race.

Office Contact Information

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(202) 224-2235

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RSOB- Russell Senate Office Building Room 218
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Alexandria, VA 22314

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Elton Hayes
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Amy Gabriel
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Molly Carpenter
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Election Results

2010 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 1,005,615
Percent: 58.86%
Rodney Glassman
Votes: 592,011
Percent: 34.65%
2010 PRIMARY
John McCain
Votes: 333,744
Percent: 56.25%
J. D. Hayworth
Votes: 190,229
Percent: 32.06%
Jim Deakin
Votes: 69,328
Percent: 11.69%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 140,472
Percent: 53.5%
John McCain
Votes: 117,089
Percent: 44.6%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 171,171
Percent: 49.9%
Barack Obama
Votes: 166,201
Percent: 48.5%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 177,136
Percent: 62.5%
Barack Obama
Votes: 103,458
Percent: 36.5%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 162,083
Percent: 63.8%
Barack Obama
Votes: 85,993
Percent: 33.9%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 158,459
Percent: 58.3%
John McCain
Votes: 110,044
Percent: 40.5%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 195,440
Percent: 65.0%
Barack Obama
Votes: 103,026
Percent: 34.3%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 164,922
Percent: 56.0%
Barack Obama
Votes: 126,668
Percent: 43.0%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 197,112
Percent: 52.2%
John McCain
Votes: 173,967
Percent: 46.1%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 215,128
Percent: 72.9%
Barack Obama
Votes: 79,941
Percent: 27.1%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 102,735
Percent: 58.2%
John McCain
Votes: 71,883
Percent: 40.7%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 198,837
Percent: 62.7%
John McCain
Votes: 114,513
Percent: 36.1%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 196,970
Percent: 60.4%
John McCain
Votes: 124,446
Percent: 38.2%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 188,098
Percent: 58.4%
John McCain
Votes: 126,781
Percent: 39.4%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 209,273
Percent: 67.4%
John McCain
Votes: 97,286
Percent: 31.3%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 168,024
Percent: 67.3%
Barack Obama
Votes: 73,470
Percent: 29.4%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 205,593
Percent: 56.0%
Barack Obama
Votes: 157,284
Percent: 42.8%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 199,555
Percent: 51.0%
John McCain
Votes: 185,396
Percent: 47.4%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 174,352
Percent: 49.66%
John McCain
Votes: 170,665
Percent: 48.61%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 172,856
Percent: 49.9%
Barack Obama
Votes: 168,922
Percent: 48.8%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 296,571
Percent: 62.95%
John McCain
Votes: 165,391
Percent: 35.11%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 169,177
Percent: 63.5%
Barack Obama
Votes: 93,523
Percent: 35.1%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 193,320
Percent: 56.2%
John McCain
Votes: 147,224
Percent: 42.8%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 274,294
Percent: 73.0%
John McCain
Votes: 91,217
Percent: 24.3%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 1,034,896
Percent: 53.87%
Barack Obama
Votes: 862,449
Percent: 44.9%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 190,918
Percent: 65.9%
John McCain
Votes: 92,717
Percent: 32.0%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 135,601
Percent: 55.8%
Barack Obama
Votes: 103,359
Percent: 42.5%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 122,691
Percent: 56.6%
John McCain
Votes: 89,376
Percent: 41.2%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 147,226
Percent: 55.1%
Barack Obama
Votes: 117,231
Percent: 43.8%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 141,696
Percent: 62.4%
John McCain
Votes: 80,808
Percent: 35.6%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 90,180
Percent: 68.6%
John McCain
Votes: 40,290
Percent: 30.6%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 220,825
Percent: 63.8%
John McCain
Votes: 118,497
Percent: 34.2%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 203,054
Percent: 53.16%
Barack Obama
Votes: 170,924
Percent: 44.75%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 129,325
Percent: 79.2%
John McCain
Votes: 29,966
Percent: 18.3%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 111,790
Percent: 63.2%
John McCain
Votes: 62,764
Percent: 35.5%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 1,479,178
Percent: 56.9%
Barack Obama
Votes: 1,087,437
Percent: 41.83%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 165,899
Percent: 69.5%
Barack Obama
Votes: 70,543
Percent: 29.5%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 108,023
Percent: 50.6%
John McCain
Votes: 101,599
Percent: 47.6%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 229,434
Percent: 85.3%
John McCain
Votes: 35,230
Percent: 13.1%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 153,378
Percent: 61.5%
John McCain
Votes: 90,643
Percent: 36.4%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 135,930
Percent: 50.4%
Barack Obama
Votes: 127,988
Percent: 47.5%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 135,149
Percent: 58.8%
Barack Obama
Votes: 89,870
Percent: 39.1%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 175,685
Percent: 50.4%
Barack Obama
Votes: 170,315
Percent: 48.8%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 254,712
Percent: 74.2%
John McCain
Votes: 84,390
Percent: 24.6%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 221,720
Percent: 65.5%
Barack Obama
Votes: 114,412
Percent: 33.8%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 190,798
Percent: 53.6%
Barack Obama
Votes: 160,955
Percent: 45.2%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 4,479,328
Percent: 55.45%
Barack Obama
Votes: 3,528,633
Percent: 43.68%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 187,020
Percent: 58.9%
Barack Obama
Votes: 126,885
Percent: 40.0%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 246,527
Percent: 72.1%
John McCain
Votes: 92,456
Percent: 27.0%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 170,669
Percent: 62.6%
Barack Obama
Votes: 97,715
Percent: 35.9%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 185,409
Percent: 55.3%
John McCain
Votes: 147,208
Percent: 43.9%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 173,044
Percent: 53.8%
Barack Obama
Votes: 145,023
Percent: 45.1%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 191,700
Percent: 54.6%
Barack Obama
Votes: 151,818
Percent: 43.3%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 130,602
Percent: 56.4%
John McCain
Votes: 95,777
Percent: 41.4%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 186,216
Percent: 56.4%
Barack Obama
Votes: 138,610
Percent: 42.0%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 205,680
Percent: 73.0%
Barack Obama
Votes: 72,152
Percent: 25.6%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 166,247
Percent: 60.0%
Barack Obama
Votes: 103,478
Percent: 37.4%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 145,019
Percent: 80.5%
John McCain
Votes: 32,827
Percent: 18.2%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 222,868
Percent: 72.7%
John McCain
Votes: 81,782
Percent: 26.7%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 162,898
Percent: 54.1%
Barack Obama
Votes: 133,960
Percent: 44.5%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 191,473
Percent: 50.1%
Barack Obama
Votes: 184,953
Percent: 48.3%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 191,402
Percent: 66.2%
Barack Obama
Votes: 97,901
Percent: 33.8%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 161,081
Percent: 64.2%
Barack Obama
Votes: 86,282
Percent: 34.4%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 194,984
Percent: 59.6%
John McCain
Votes: 130,129
Percent: 39.8%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 247,535
Percent: 77.4%
John McCain
Votes: 69,767
Percent: 21.8%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 212,409
Percent: 58.3%
John McCain
Votes: 143,740
Percent: 39.4%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 187,326
Percent: 54.4%
Barack Obama
Votes: 150,274
Percent: 43.7%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 124,280
Percent: 55.6%
Barack Obama
Votes: 90,486
Percent: 40.5%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 197,384
Percent: 56.6%
Barack Obama
Votes: 146,233
Percent: 41.9%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 229,353
Percent: 62.7%
John McCain
Votes: 129,816
Percent: 35.5%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 170,697
Percent: 49.6%
John McCain
Votes: 167,011
Percent: 48.6%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 166,875
Percent: 58.6%
Barack Obama
Votes: 112,473
Percent: 39.5%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 195,927
Percent: 67.9%
Barack Obama
Votes: 89,622
Percent: 31.1%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 164,141
Percent: 60.7%
Barack Obama
Votes: 102,157
Percent: 37.8%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 191,812
Percent: 61.5%
Barack Obama
Votes: 115,480
Percent: 37.0%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 210,108
Percent: 54.2%
John McCain
Votes: 165,368
Percent: 42.7%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 126,147
Percent: 78.5%
John McCain
Votes: 31,510
Percent: 19.6%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 108,636
Percent: 59.3%
John McCain
Votes: 70,547
Percent: 38.5%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 122,371
Percent: 54.6%
Barack Obama
Votes: 97,426
Percent: 43.5%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 180,881
Percent: 76.3%
John McCain
Votes: 52,350
Percent: 22.1%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 596,030
Percent: 62.58%
Barack Obama
Votes: 327,670
Percent: 34.41%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 162,724
Percent: 51.1%
Barack Obama
Votes: 148,791
Percent: 46.8%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 92,591
Percent: 58.6%
John McCain
Votes: 61,861
Percent: 39.1%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 146,518
Percent: 58.4%
John McCain
Votes: 98,637
Percent: 39.3%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 165,162
Percent: 51.4%
Barack Obama
Votes: 148,929
Percent: 46.4%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 219,262
Percent: 67.46%
John McCain
Votes: 98,974
Percent: 30.45%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 159,523
Percent: 51.0%
Barack Obama
Votes: 144,118
Percent: 46.1%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 178,887
Percent: 51.0%
Barack Obama
Votes: 167,861
Percent: 47.9%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 1,959,532
Percent: 52.63%
John McCain
Votes: 1,725,005
Percent: 46.33%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 213,779
Percent: 73.1%
John McCain
Votes: 77,017
Percent: 26.3%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 183,827
Percent: 50.6%
Barack Obama
Votes: 175,802
Percent: 48.4%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 137,698
Percent: 61.8%
Barack Obama
Votes: 83,216
Percent: 37.3%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 203,250
Percent: 61.7%
Barack Obama
Votes: 122,577
Percent: 37.2%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 197,556
Percent: 56.8%
Barack Obama
Votes: 146,200
Percent: 42.0%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 170,158
Percent: 57.5%
John McCain
Votes: 122,210
Percent: 41.3%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 206,659
Percent: 86.1%
John McCain
Votes: 32,559
Percent: 13.6%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 160,364
Percent: 51.5%
Barack Obama
Votes: 146,574
Percent: 47.1%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 217,090
Percent: 71.0%
John McCain
Votes: 82,366
Percent: 26.9%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 188,391
Percent: 58.8%
Barack Obama
Votes: 127,254
Percent: 39.7%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 184,654
Percent: 62.4%
Barack Obama
Votes: 107,223
Percent: 36.2%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 214,862
Percent: 69.9%
John McCain
Votes: 88,434
Percent: 28.8%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 1,750,848
Percent: 57.65%
John McCain
Votes: 1,229,216
Percent: 40.48%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 180,360
Percent: 52.6%
Barack Obama
Votes: 159,549
Percent: 46.5%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 170,003
Percent: 59.3%
Barack Obama
Votes: 116,877
Percent: 40.7%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 179,647
Percent: 62.6%
Barack Obama
Votes: 104,100
Percent: 36.3%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 185,130
Percent: 56.4%
John McCain
Votes: 139,043
Percent: 42.4%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 221,877
Percent: 65.2%
John McCain
Votes: 114,624
Percent: 33.7%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 231,423
Percent: 66.3%
John McCain
Votes: 110,618
Percent: 31.7%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 194,787
Percent: 52.2%
Barack Obama
Votes: 171,859
Percent: 46.0%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 228,766
Percent: 62.3%
John McCain
Votes: 134,365
Percent: 36.6%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 270,310
Percent: 73.4%
John McCain
Votes: 90,500
Percent: 24.6%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 230,776
Percent: 63.0%
John McCain
Votes: 129,513
Percent: 35.4%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 397,466
Percent: 55.71%
Barack Obama
Votes: 303,857
Percent: 42.59%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 174,245
Percent: 66.7%
Barack Obama
Votes: 82,582
Percent: 31.6%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 161,222
Percent: 58.6%
Barack Obama
Votes: 108,629
Percent: 39.5%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 208,508
Percent: 60.8%
Barack Obama
Votes: 131,676
Percent: 38.4%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 183,911
Percent: 55.1%
John McCain
Votes: 143,372
Percent: 43.0%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 182,282
Percent: 61.5%
John McCain
Votes: 108,696
Percent: 36.7%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 163,612
Percent: 57.1%
John McCain
Votes: 117,348
Percent: 41.0%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 172,622
Percent: 50.9%
John McCain
Votes: 163,148
Percent: 48.1%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 186,366
Percent: 57.1%
John McCain
Votes: 133,682
Percent: 40.9%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 186,868
Percent: 56.9%
Barack Obama
Votes: 137,684
Percent: 41.9%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 184,881
Percent: 49.33%
John McCain
Votes: 184,230
Percent: 49.16%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 192,811
Percent: 53.6%
Barack Obama
Votes: 163,657
Percent: 45.5%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 170,981
Percent: 58.4%
John McCain
Votes: 118,362
Percent: 40.5%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 1,573,354
Percent: 54.06%
John McCain
Votes: 1,275,409
Percent: 43.82%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 224,642
Percent: 67.9%
Barack Obama
Votes: 103,383
Percent: 31.2%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 201,509
Percent: 55.7%
Barack Obama
Votes: 156,585
Percent: 43.3%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 188,284
Percent: 65.0%
Barack Obama
Votes: 97,110
Percent: 33.5%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 126,785
Percent: 63.4%
John McCain
Votes: 71,417
Percent: 35.7%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 187,056
Percent: 53.1%
John McCain
Votes: 161,943
Percent: 45.9%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 163,592
Percent: 68.2%
John McCain
Votes: 71,144
Percent: 29.7%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 175,487
Percent: 53.6%
John McCain
Votes: 147,091
Percent: 45.0%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 236,543
Percent: 74.0%
Barack Obama
Votes: 80,357
Percent: 25.1%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 178,574
Percent: 51.2%
John McCain
Votes: 165,814
Percent: 47.5%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 182,881
Percent: 59.3%
Barack Obama
Votes: 122,235
Percent: 39.6%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 167,843
Percent: 54.9%
Barack Obama
Votes: 133,164
Percent: 43.6%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 182,681
Percent: 57.7%
Barack Obama
Votes: 130,379
Percent: 41.2%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 176,039
Percent: 56.4%
John McCain
Votes: 131,343
Percent: 42.1%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 175,237
Percent: 78.3%
John McCain
Votes: 47,144
Percent: 21.1%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 200,737
Percent: 55.4%
Barack Obama
Votes: 155,924
Percent: 43.1%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 194,396
Percent: 54.7%
Barack Obama
Votes: 153,633
Percent: 43.2%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 184,186
Percent: 53.1%
John McCain
Votes: 156,835
Percent: 45.2%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 202,724
Percent: 72.4%
John McCain
Votes: 74,764
Percent: 26.7%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 165,833
Percent: 53.7%
Barack Obama
Votes: 138,456
Percent: 44.8%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 302,549
Percent: 80.1%
John McCain
Votes: 67,882
Percent: 18.0%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 207,023
Percent: 55.5%
Barack Obama
Votes: 162,704
Percent: 43.6%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 198,323
Percent: 53.0%
John McCain
Votes: 169,076
Percent: 45.2%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 167,059
Percent: 49.99%
Barack Obama
Votes: 164,563
Percent: 49.24%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 188,348
Percent: 51.8%
Barack Obama
Votes: 171,277
Percent: 47.1%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 140,692
Percent: 58.7%
Barack Obama
Votes: 96,866
Percent: 40.4%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 187,709
Percent: 57.6%
Barack Obama
Votes: 135,480
Percent: 41.6%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 178,275
Percent: 62.4%
Barack Obama
Votes: 103,878
Percent: 36.3%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 158,853
Percent: 84.4%
John McCain
Votes: 28,091
Percent: 14.9%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 194,026
Percent: 52.6%
John McCain
Votes: 171,283
Percent: 46.4%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 153,405
Percent: 51.7%
John McCain
Votes: 137,313
Percent: 46.3%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 187,507
Percent: 57.4%
John McCain
Votes: 132,985
Percent: 40.7%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 231,758
Percent: 71.7%
John McCain
Votes: 90,138
Percent: 27.9%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 283,996
Percent: 89.5%
John McCain
Votes: 31,475
Percent: 9.9%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 152,391
Percent: 60.0%
Barack Obama
Votes: 99,388
Percent: 39.1%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 185,573
Percent: 66.3%
John McCain
Votes: 91,874
Percent: 32.8%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 86,034
Percent: 64.7%
John McCain
Votes: 45,336
Percent: 34.1%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 251,564
Percent: 76.5%
John McCain
Votes: 73,830
Percent: 22.5%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 220,368
Percent: 82.2%
John McCain
Votes: 41,680
Percent: 15.6%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 173,095
Percent: 50.9%
Barack Obama
Votes: 159,263
Percent: 46.9%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 216,157
Percent: 63.2%
Barack Obama
Votes: 121,048
Percent: 35.4%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 173,463
Percent: 50.4%
Barack Obama
Votes: 162,218
Percent: 47.1%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 177,638
Percent: 50.8%
John McCain
Votes: 165,747
Percent: 47.4%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 145,646
Percent: 53.6%
Barack Obama
Votes: 123,077
Percent: 45.3%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 154,604
Percent: 51.3%
John McCain
Votes: 140,634
Percent: 46.6%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 236,148
Percent: 68.4%
John McCain
Votes: 105,507
Percent: 30.6%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 195,295
Percent: 53.5%
John McCain
Votes: 164,160
Percent: 45.0%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 200,870
Percent: 55.1%
Barack Obama
Votes: 160,150
Percent: 43.9%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 160,903
Percent: 73.4%
John McCain
Votes: 56,502
Percent: 25.8%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 171,408
Percent: 73.0%
Barack Obama
Votes: 61,357
Percent: 26.1%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 170,657
Percent: 57.4%
Barack Obama
Votes: 123,885
Percent: 41.7%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 202,797
Percent: 64.2%
Barack Obama
Votes: 109,855
Percent: 34.8%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 208,317
Percent: 86.0%
John McCain
Votes: 32,990
Percent: 13.6%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 198,668
Percent: 53.2%
John McCain
Votes: 170,830
Percent: 45.7%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 124,020
Percent: 55.3%
Barack Obama
Votes: 94,577
Percent: 42.2%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 150,911
Percent: 61.8%
John McCain
Votes: 90,219
Percent: 36.9%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 163,390
Percent: 61.4%
Barack Obama
Votes: 100,722
Percent: 37.9%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 156,723
Percent: 50.6%
Barack Obama
Votes: 149,099
Percent: 48.1%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 174,731
Percent: 60.6%
Barack Obama
Votes: 110,760
Percent: 38.4%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 215,394
Percent: 63.1%
John McCain
Votes: 121,976
Percent: 35.7%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 208,779
Percent: 58.6%
John McCain
Votes: 140,293
Percent: 39.3%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 210,503
Percent: 60.2%
Barack Obama
Votes: 133,188
Percent: 38.1%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 194,325
Percent: 60.0%
Barack Obama
Votes: 124,383
Percent: 38.4%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 195,862
Percent: 53.1%
John McCain
Votes: 164,382
Percent: 44.5%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 195,798
Percent: 52.0%
John McCain
Votes: 174,506
Percent: 46.4%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 187,672
Percent: 68.3%
John McCain
Votes: 81,964
Percent: 29.8%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 178,998
Percent: 58.3%
Barack Obama
Votes: 123,420
Percent: 40.2%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 158,329
Percent: 60.3%
John McCain
Votes: 102,838
Percent: 39.1%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 171,658
Percent: 64.1%
John McCain
Votes: 94,237
Percent: 35.2%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 144,707
Percent: 76.1%
John McCain
Votes: 44,520
Percent: 23.4%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 190,650
Percent: 53.9%
Barack Obama
Votes: 160,219
Percent: 45.3%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 223,547
Percent: 76.9%
John McCain
Votes: 65,316
Percent: 22.5%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 208,746
Percent: 84.1%
John McCain
Votes: 38,277
Percent: 15.4%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 183,396
Percent: 56.2%
John McCain
Votes: 136,881
Percent: 41.9%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 180,029
Percent: 52.2%
Barack Obama
Votes: 161,417
Percent: 46.8%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 185,855
Percent: 50.6%
John McCain
Votes: 176,152
Percent: 48.0%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 140,421
Percent: 56.7%
Barack Obama
Votes: 102,826
Percent: 41.5%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 156,580
Percent: 70.3%
John McCain
Votes: 63,035
Percent: 28.3%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 240,024
Percent: 67.0%
Barack Obama
Votes: 114,887
Percent: 32.1%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 186,561
Percent: 52.8%
John McCain
Votes: 163,941
Percent: 46.4%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 219,570
Percent: 64.6%
John McCain
Votes: 116,187
Percent: 34.2%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 177,494
Percent: 59.7%
John McCain
Votes: 115,818
Percent: 39.0%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 178,520
Percent: 68.9%
Barack Obama
Votes: 78,918
Percent: 30.4%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 239,802
Percent: 73.4%
Barack Obama
Votes: 82,965
Percent: 25.4%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 235,289
Percent: 70.6%
John McCain
Votes: 96,353
Percent: 28.9%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 143,124
Percent: 53.9%
Barack Obama
Votes: 117,515
Percent: 44.2%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 188,265
Percent: 69.9%
Barack Obama
Votes: 77,100
Percent: 28.6%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 168,771
Percent: 51.4%
John McCain
Votes: 156,586
Percent: 47.6%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 244,543
Percent: 77.7%
John McCain
Votes: 67,747
Percent: 21.5%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 178,181
Percent: 54.6%
Barack Obama
Votes: 140,368
Percent: 43.0%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 166,057
Percent: 52.6%
Barack Obama
Votes: 145,767
Percent: 46.2%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 140,444
Percent: 51.3%
John McCain
Votes: 129,813
Percent: 47.4%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 217,957
Percent: 57.5%
John McCain
Votes: 153,905
Percent: 40.6%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 227,406
Percent: 66.8%
John McCain
Votes: 107,499
Percent: 31.6%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 213,968
Percent: 58.0%
John McCain
Votes: 148,234
Percent: 40.2%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 121,329
Percent: 64.5%
John McCain
Votes: 62,107
Percent: 33.0%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 238,308
Percent: 70.9%
John McCain
Votes: 92,831
Percent: 27.6%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 183,754
Percent: 60.9%
Barack Obama
Votes: 115,981
Percent: 38.4%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 151,947
Percent: 57.9%
Barack Obama
Votes: 102,943
Percent: 39.2%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 287,240
Percent: 80.6%
John McCain
Votes: 66,840
Percent: 18.8%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 143,783
Percent: 55.0%
Barack Obama
Votes: 116,218
Percent: 44.4%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 194,540
Percent: 63.3%
John McCain
Votes: 109,969
Percent: 35.8%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 227,310
Percent: 58.3%
John McCain
Votes: 156,980
Percent: 40.3%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 204,009
Percent: 64.2%
Barack Obama
Votes: 113,909
Percent: 35.8%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 131,209
Percent: 51.0%
Barack Obama
Votes: 123,077
Percent: 47.8%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 205,913
Percent: 62.5%
Barack Obama
Votes: 115,667
Percent: 35.1%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 219,219
Percent: 65.8%
John McCain
Votes: 109,658
Percent: 32.9%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 231,351
Percent: 61.0%
John McCain
Votes: 141,445
Percent: 37.3%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 208,977
Percent: 59.8%
Barack Obama
Votes: 134,621
Percent: 38.5%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 212,498
Percent: 63.9%
John McCain
Votes: 111,583
Percent: 33.6%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 188,145
Percent: 51.8%
Barack Obama
Votes: 171,639
Percent: 47.2%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 160,063
Percent: 67.4%
Barack Obama
Votes: 70,257
Percent: 29.6%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 308,944
Percent: 80.4%
John McCain
Votes: 71,776
Percent: 18.7%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 177,494
Percent: 50.9%
John McCain
Votes: 162,737
Percent: 46.7%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 183,283
Percent: 49.7%
John McCain
Votes: 178,548
Percent: 48.4%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 149,420
Percent: 67.5%
John McCain
Votes: 71,436
Percent: 32.3%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 189,895
Percent: 67.2%
Barack Obama
Votes: 87,641
Percent: 31.0%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 202,734
Percent: 62.4%
Barack Obama
Votes: 118,724
Percent: 36.6%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 210,170
Percent: 56.3%
John McCain
Votes: 155,308
Percent: 41.6%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 185,540
Percent: 61.6%
Barack Obama
Votes: 111,047
Percent: 36.9%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 211,153
Percent: 59.6%
John McCain
Votes: 133,544
Percent: 37.7%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 170,578
Percent: 57.9%
Barack Obama
Votes: 120,644
Percent: 40.9%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 127,949
Percent: 56.9%
John McCain
Votes: 93,008
Percent: 41.3%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 222,304
Percent: 68.6%
John McCain
Votes: 98,150
Percent: 30.3%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 197,659
Percent: 74.8%
Barack Obama
Votes: 63,694
Percent: 24.1%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 110,687
Percent: 65.4%
John McCain
Votes: 55,414
Percent: 32.7%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 177,218
Percent: 50.0%
Barack Obama
Votes: 170,050
Percent: 48.0%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 180,772
Percent: 69.7%
Barack Obama
Votes: 75,910
Percent: 29.3%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 170,490
Percent: 94.6%
John McCain
Votes: 9,375
Percent: 5.2%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 452,979
Percent: 56.53%
Barack Obama
Votes: 333,319
Percent: 41.6%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 93,222
Percent: 57.9%
John McCain
Votes: 65,023
Percent: 40.4%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 90,178
Percent: 60.0%
John McCain
Votes: 58,707
Percent: 39.1%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 135,738
Percent: 58.0%
Barack Obama
Votes: 95,884
Percent: 40.9%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 172,218
Percent: 51.1%
John McCain
Votes: 162,205
Percent: 48.2%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 196,869
Percent: 55.1%
Barack Obama
Votes: 156,794
Percent: 43.9%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 156,560
Percent: 56.1%
Barack Obama
Votes: 119,461
Percent: 42.8%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 164,768
Percent: 82.5%
John McCain
Votes: 31,680
Percent: 15.9%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 472,422
Percent: 56.91%
John McCain
Votes: 346,832
Percent: 41.78%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 148,120
Percent: 49.56%
John McCain
Votes: 144,815
Percent: 48.45%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 235,276
Percent: 73.9%
John McCain
Votes: 82,242
Percent: 25.8%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 230,500
Percent: 57.1%
Barack Obama
Votes: 168,328
Percent: 41.7%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 255,683
Percent: 84.4%
John McCain
Votes: 45,247
Percent: 14.9%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 1,266,546
Percent: 60.32%
Barack Obama
Votes: 813,479
Percent: 38.74%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 193,841
Percent: 59.42%
Barack Obama
Votes: 123,594
Percent: 37.89%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 1,230,111
Percent: 53.64%
Barack Obama
Votes: 1,034,707
Percent: 45.12%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 638,017
Percent: 58.72%
Barack Obama
Votes: 422,310
Percent: 38.86%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 8,274,473
Percent: 61.01%
John McCain
Votes: 5,011,781
Percent: 36.95%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 165,158
Percent: 61.5%
Barack Obama
Votes: 100,440
Percent: 37.4%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 151,486
Percent: 55.1%
Barack Obama
Votes: 120,018
Percent: 43.7%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 187,682
Percent: 53.0%
John McCain
Votes: 156,657
Percent: 44.2%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 142,789
Percent: 55.3%
John McCain
Votes: 110,142
Percent: 42.7%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 112,197
Percent: 66.0%
John McCain
Votes: 54,780
Percent: 32.2%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 1,288,576
Percent: 53.66%
John McCain
Votes: 1,073,589
Percent: 44.71%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 1,445,814
Percent: 49.43%
Barack Obama
Votes: 1,441,911
Percent: 49.29%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 1,677,211
Percent: 56.22%
John McCain
Votes: 1,262,393
Percent: 42.31%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 997,772
Percent: 60.59%
John McCain
Votes: 629,428
Percent: 38.22%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 2,142,651
Percent: 49.7%
John McCain
Votes: 2,128,474
Percent: 49.38%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 255,459
Percent: 61.94%
John McCain
Votes: 152,374
Percent: 36.95%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 245,800
Percent: 92.0%
John McCain
Votes: 17,367
Percent: 7.0%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 4,282,074
Percent: 51.03%
John McCain
Votes: 4,045,624
Percent: 48.22%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 151,269
Percent: 50.7%
John McCain
Votes: 139,866
Percent: 46.9%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 2,048,759
Percent: 52.2%
Barack Obama
Votes: 1,844,123
Percent: 46.99%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 148,503
Percent: 57.0%
Barack Obama
Votes: 109,854
Percent: 42.2%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 164,958
Percent: 64.78%
Barack Obama
Votes: 82,868
Percent: 32.54%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 325,871
Percent: 71.85%
John McCain
Votes: 120,566
Percent: 26.58%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 403,012
Percent: 61.53%
Barack Obama
Votes: 236,440
Percent: 36.1%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 3,419,348
Percent: 61.92%
John McCain
Votes: 2,031,179
Percent: 36.78%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 1,374,039
Percent: 49.95%
John McCain
Votes: 1,345,648
Percent: 48.91%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 828,940
Percent: 53.93%
John McCain
Votes: 682,379
Percent: 44.39%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 150,402
Percent: 49.6%
John McCain
Votes: 147,906
Percent: 48.78%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 699,655
Percent: 56.61%
Barack Obama
Votes: 514,765
Percent: 41.65%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 1,048,462
Percent: 57.4%
Barack Obama
Votes: 751,985
Percent: 41.17%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 1,148,275
Percent: 58.56%
Barack Obama
Votes: 782,989
Percent: 39.93%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 152,453
Percent: 58.4%
Barack Obama
Votes: 105,822
Percent: 40.5%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 421,923
Percent: 57.71%
John McCain
Votes: 295,273
Percent: 40.38%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 1,629,467
Percent: 61.92%
John McCain
Votes: 959,862
Percent: 36.47%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 177,072
Percent: 53.1%
Barack Obama
Votes: 149,039
Percent: 44.7%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 1,904,097
Percent: 61.8%
John McCain
Votes: 1,108,854
Percent: 35.99%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 164,732
Percent: 52.1%
Barack Obama
Votes: 148,928
Percent: 47.1%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 241,834
Percent: 84.6%
John McCain
Votes: 42,288
Percent: 14.8%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 148,867
Percent: 56.2%
Barack Obama
Votes: 112,866
Percent: 42.6%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 190,495
Percent: 57.0%
Barack Obama
Votes: 140,427
Percent: 42.0%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 196,042
Percent: 75.7%
John McCain
Votes: 60,668
Percent: 23.4%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 169,585
Percent: 56.5%
Barack Obama
Votes: 126,919
Percent: 42.3%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 111,656
Percent: 50.3%
John McCain
Votes: 105,903
Percent: 47.7%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 180,732
Percent: 63.0%
John McCain
Votes: 103,170
Percent: 36.0%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 172,128
Percent: 58.4%
Barack Obama
Votes: 119,963
Percent: 40.7%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 183,272
Percent: 49.31%
John McCain
Votes: 183,268
Percent: 49.31%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 2,872,579
Percent: 57.43%
John McCain
Votes: 2,048,639
Percent: 40.96%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 205,422
Percent: 62.2%
John McCain
Votes: 122,085
Percent: 37.0%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 196,950
Percent: 55.9%
Barack Obama
Votes: 152,040
Percent: 43.1%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 194,639
Percent: 52.1%
Barack Obama
Votes: 175,560
Percent: 47.0%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 184,238
Percent: 75.9%
Barack Obama
Votes: 56,145
Percent: 23.1%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 197,003
Percent: 58.2%
Barack Obama
Votes: 137,010
Percent: 40.4%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 118,112
Percent: 50.9%
Barack Obama
Votes: 112,044
Percent: 48.3%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 158,939
Percent: 51.7%
Barack Obama
Votes: 144,964
Percent: 47.1%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 216,720
Percent: 69.4%
John McCain
Votes: 89,616
Percent: 28.7%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 170,803
Percent: 62.1%
John McCain
Votes: 100,755
Percent: 36.7%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 192,618
Percent: 64.6%
Barack Obama
Votes: 102,471
Percent: 34.3%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 303,512
Percent: 82.0%
John McCain
Votes: 63,649
Percent: 17.2%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 194,092
Percent: 50.3%
John McCain
Votes: 186,010
Percent: 48.2%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 178,007
Percent: 52.2%
Barack Obama
Votes: 159,371
Percent: 46.8%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 203,899
Percent: 65.7%
John McCain
Votes: 103,322
Percent: 33.3%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 161,030
Percent: 63.6%
Barack Obama
Votes: 89,718
Percent: 35.4%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 231,627
Percent: 78.2%
John McCain
Votes: 62,885
Percent: 21.2%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 243,665
Percent: 80.2%
John McCain
Votes: 57,332
Percent: 18.9%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 194,401
Percent: 54.0%
Barack Obama
Votes: 161,068
Percent: 44.8%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 288,455
Percent: 85.0%
John McCain
Votes: 43,969
Percent: 13.0%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 179,180
Percent: 54.7%
John McCain
Votes: 142,723
Percent: 43.6%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 146,559
Percent: 55.5%
Barack Obama
Votes: 116,152
Percent: 44.0%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 201,582
Percent: 53.7%
Barack Obama
Votes: 167,884
Percent: 44.8%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 234,573
Percent: 66.9%
John McCain
Votes: 110,099
Percent: 31.4%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 177,758
Percent: 51.3%
John McCain
Votes: 164,644
Percent: 47.5%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 189,600
Percent: 76.9%
Barack Obama
Votes: 54,855
Percent: 22.2%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 197,407
Percent: 54.1%
Barack Obama
Votes: 164,075
Percent: 45.0%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 225,845
Percent: 93.3%
John McCain
Votes: 14,850
Percent: 6.1%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 217,033
Percent: 64.7%
John McCain
Votes: 115,479
Percent: 34.4%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 283,183
Percent: 87.9%
John McCain
Votes: 32,359
Percent: 10.0%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 174,982
Percent: 54.6%
John McCain
Votes: 139,445
Percent: 43.5%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 201,058
Percent: 67.9%
John McCain
Votes: 93,288
Percent: 31.5%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 221,979
Percent: 62.3%
John McCain
Votes: 127,497
Percent: 35.8%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 273,824
Percent: 86.3%
John McCain
Votes: 40,628
Percent: 12.8%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 182,595
Percent: 65.2%
John McCain
Votes: 95,075
Percent: 34.0%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 139,304
Percent: 57.0%
Barack Obama
Votes: 102,902
Percent: 42.1%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 135,268
Percent: 76.1%
John McCain
Votes: 41,296
Percent: 23.2%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 243,829
Percent: 67.0%
John McCain
Votes: 116,437
Percent: 32.0%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 214,398
Percent: 74.5%
John McCain
Votes: 68,555
Percent: 23.8%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 163,745
Percent: 50.1%
John McCain
Votes: 158,818
Percent: 48.6%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 170,349
Percent: 71.0%
Barack Obama
Votes: 66,722
Percent: 27.8%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 190,154
Percent: 49.45%
Barack Obama
Votes: 188,635
Percent: 49.06%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 301,342
Percent: 81.0%
John McCain
Votes: 67,646
Percent: 18.2%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 158,042
Percent: 53.1%
Barack Obama
Votes: 137,327
Percent: 46.1%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 83,924
Percent: 57.3%
John McCain
Votes: 61,282
Percent: 41.8%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 242,763
Percent: 49.51%
Barack Obama
Votes: 231,667
Percent: 47.25%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 165,928
Percent: 52.1%
John McCain
Votes: 148,581
Percent: 46.6%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 181,441
Percent: 67.6%
John McCain
Votes: 81,938
Percent: 30.5%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 180,711
Percent: 55.4%
Barack Obama
Votes: 139,551
Percent: 42.8%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 183,131
Percent: 52.2%
Barack Obama
Votes: 161,569
Percent: 46.1%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 181,956
Percent: 51.0%
Barack Obama
Votes: 172,028
Percent: 48.2%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 109,387
Percent: 64.4%
John McCain
Votes: 58,764
Percent: 34.6%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 205,767
Percent: 72.9%
John McCain
Votes: 74,524
Percent: 26.4%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 151,172
Percent: 49.93%
John McCain
Votes: 148,895
Percent: 49.18%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 533,736
Percent: 55.15%
John McCain
Votes: 412,827
Percent: 42.65%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 160,925
Percent: 50.1%
John McCain
Votes: 154,801
Percent: 48.1%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 196,843
Percent: 51.3%
Barack Obama
Votes: 181,055
Percent: 47.2%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 166,643
Percent: 55.9%
Barack Obama
Votes: 128,537
Percent: 43.1%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 384,826
Percent: 54.13%
John McCain
Votes: 316,534
Percent: 44.52%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 181,757
Percent: 58.0%
John McCain
Votes: 129,021
Percent: 41.2%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 174,418
Percent: 56.9%
John McCain
Votes: 128,540
Percent: 41.9%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 169,756
Percent: 69.8%
John McCain
Votes: 68,528
Percent: 28.2%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 185,641
Percent: 60.0%
John McCain
Votes: 119,033
Percent: 38.5%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 2,215,422
Percent: 57.27%
John McCain
Votes: 1,613,207
Percent: 41.7%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 150,733
Percent: 76.6%
John McCain
Votes: 45,069
Percent: 22.9%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 162,572
Percent: 52.1%
John McCain
Votes: 146,266
Percent: 46.9%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 724,597
Percent: 56.18%
Barack Obama
Votes: 554,662
Percent: 43.0%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 238,285
Percent: 70.5%
John McCain
Votes: 92,539
Percent: 27.4%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 187,804
Percent: 54.3%
Barack Obama
Votes: 152,369
Percent: 44.1%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 181,386
Percent: 56.9%
Barack Obama
Votes: 135,070
Percent: 42.4%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 168,553
Percent: 71.2%
Barack Obama
Votes: 66,122
Percent: 27.9%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 175,800
Percent: 53.0%
John McCain
Votes: 150,359
Percent: 45.3%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 158,588
Percent: 68.9%
John McCain
Votes: 67,461
Percent: 29.3%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 187,392
Percent: 60.5%
John McCain
Votes: 116,288
Percent: 37.6%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 163,767
Percent: 50.3%
John McCain
Votes: 158,259
Percent: 48.6%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 274,372
Percent: 70.0%
John McCain
Votes: 111,956
Percent: 28.6%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 136,259
Percent: 54.6%
Barack Obama
Votes: 109,369
Percent: 43.9%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 169,291
Percent: 73.4%
John McCain
Votes: 57,531
Percent: 24.9%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 179,368
Percent: 52.0%
Barack Obama
Votes: 162,346
Percent: 47.1%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 198,261
Percent: 56.0%
John McCain
Votes: 152,591
Percent: 43.1%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 174,413
Percent: 53.3%
John McCain
Votes: 148,485
Percent: 45.4%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 122,892
Percent: 50.2%
Barack Obama
Votes: 118,663
Percent: 48.4%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 150,665
Percent: 61.8%
Barack Obama
Votes: 91,087
Percent: 37.4%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 4,804,945
Percent: 62.88%
John McCain
Votes: 2,752,771
Percent: 36.03%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 169,518
Percent: 55.7%
Barack Obama
Votes: 131,886
Percent: 43.3%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 133,018
Percent: 49.5%
John McCain
Votes: 131,223
Percent: 48.9%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 188,257
Percent: 64.0%
Barack Obama
Votes: 101,583
Percent: 34.5%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 156,145
Percent: 51.3%
John McCain
Votes: 145,881
Percent: 47.9%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 347,883
Percent: 90.9%
John McCain
Votes: 33,395
Percent: 8.7%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 255,854
Percent: 71.7%
John McCain
Votes: 91,831
Percent: 25.7%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 141,333
Percent: 49.4%
John McCain
Votes: 137,854
Percent: 48.2%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 255,225
Percent: 61.2%
John McCain
Votes: 154,907
Percent: 37.1%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 188,634
Percent: 64.4%
Barack Obama
Votes: 102,625
Percent: 35.0%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 157,732
Percent: 53.8%
Barack Obama
Votes: 129,888
Percent: 44.3%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 270,029
Percent: 81.2%
John McCain
Votes: 60,104
Percent: 18.1%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 153,890
Percent: 57.8%
John McCain
Votes: 111,166
Percent: 41.7%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 145,620
Percent: 49.52%
John McCain
Votes: 144,921
Percent: 49.28%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 219,565
Percent: 56.8%
John McCain
Votes: 159,959
Percent: 41.4%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 179,566
Percent: 65.7%
Barack Obama
Votes: 93,712
Percent: 34.3%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 153,730
Percent: 49.82%
Barack Obama
Votes: 150,896
Percent: 48.91%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 197,099
Percent: 60.5%
Barack Obama
Votes: 120,773
Percent: 37.1%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 199,603
Percent: 58.6%
John McCain
Votes: 136,086
Percent: 40.0%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 190,572
Percent: 54.2%
John McCain
Votes: 153,828
Percent: 43.8%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 185,470
Percent: 60.8%
John McCain
Votes: 114,875
Percent: 37.7%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 202,394
Percent: 60.2%
John McCain
Votes: 124,947
Percent: 37.2%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 195,959
Percent: 54.2%
Barack Obama
Votes: 160,158
Percent: 44.3%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 143,656
Percent: 58.5%
Barack Obama
Votes: 93,415
Percent: 38.0%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 225,408
Percent: 52.6%
Barack Obama
Votes: 199,105
Percent: 46.5%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 184,918
Percent: 50.4%
John McCain
Votes: 174,721
Percent: 47.6%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 175,945
Percent: 50.3%
Barack Obama
Votes: 168,007
Percent: 48.1%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 147,123
Percent: 60.4%
John McCain
Votes: 93,951
Percent: 38.5%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 170,029
Percent: 52.8%
Barack Obama
Votes: 145,729
Percent: 45.3%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 214,639
Percent: 64.3%
John McCain
Votes: 117,427
Percent: 35.2%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 172,967
Percent: 62.4%
Barack Obama
Votes: 101,229
Percent: 36.5%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 183,789
Percent: 61.5%
Barack Obama
Votes: 111,111
Percent: 37.2%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 191,689
Percent: 53.8%
Barack Obama
Votes: 154,051
Percent: 43.3%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 205,844
Percent: 81.0%
John McCain
Votes: 47,128
Percent: 18.6%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 115,579
Percent: 58.2%
John McCain
Votes: 80,667
Percent: 40.6%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 198,650
Percent: 58.3%
John McCain
Votes: 135,552
Percent: 39.8%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 181,058
Percent: 72.1%
John McCain
Votes: 64,803
Percent: 25.8%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 203,701
Percent: 63.6%
John McCain
Votes: 115,178
Percent: 36.0%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 178,531
Percent: 56.4%
Barack Obama
Votes: 133,581
Percent: 42.2%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 150,232
Percent: 51.7%
John McCain
Votes: 135,834
Percent: 46.7%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 67,233
Percent: 52.1%
John McCain
Votes: 59,549
Percent: 46.2%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 182,430
Percent: 56.8%
John McCain
Votes: 137,096
Percent: 42.6%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 142,073
Percent: 60.5%
Barack Obama
Votes: 91,137
Percent: 38.8%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 148,567
Percent: 49.12%
Barack Obama
Votes: 148,418
Percent: 49.07%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 128,067
Percent: 55.7%
Barack Obama
Votes: 98,176
Percent: 42.7%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 170,466
Percent: 60.8%
John McCain
Votes: 108,497
Percent: 38.7%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 96,871
Percent: 49.88%
John McCain
Votes: 95,679
Percent: 49.27%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 168,601
Percent: 53.25%
Barack Obama
Votes: 141,278
Percent: 44.62%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 145,527
Percent: 61.4%
Barack Obama
Votes: 86,733
Percent: 36.6%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 207,630
Percent: 85.8%
John McCain
Votes: 33,669
Percent: 13.9%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 2,940,044
Percent: 51.5%
John McCain
Votes: 2,677,820
Percent: 46.91%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 181,791
Percent: 56.2%
John McCain
Votes: 135,947
Percent: 42.0%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 176,201
Percent: 56.7%
John McCain
Votes: 127,748
Percent: 41.1%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 121,469
Percent: 52.4%
Barack Obama
Votes: 109,129
Percent: 47.1%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 153,998
Percent: 56.1%
Barack Obama
Votes: 117,402
Percent: 42.7%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 201,019
Percent: 58.8%
John McCain
Votes: 136,489
Percent: 39.9%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 124,377
Percent: 49.14%
John McCain
Votes: 123,454
Percent: 48.78%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 133,875
Percent: 50.18%
John McCain
Votes: 131,630
Percent: 49.34%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 166,877
Percent: 64.2%
Barack Obama
Votes: 90,791
Percent: 34.9%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 208,511
Percent: 63.4%
John McCain
Votes: 115,092
Percent: 35.0%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 162,181
Percent: 55.7%
John McCain
Votes: 118,793
Percent: 40.8%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 123,543
Percent: 50.5%
Barack Obama
Votes: 120,028
Percent: 49.1%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 133,839
Percent: 59.0%
Barack Obama
Votes: 91,083
Percent: 40.1%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 186,563
Percent: 53.9%
Barack Obama
Votes: 153,875
Percent: 44.5%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 160,486
Percent: 61.7%
John McCain
Votes: 94,293
Percent: 36.2%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 92,557
Percent: 58.3%
John McCain
Votes: 65,066
Percent: 41.0%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 194,650
Percent: 70.9%
John McCain
Votes: 73,510
Percent: 26.8%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 70,286
Percent: 62.2%
John McCain
Votes: 41,843
Percent: 37.0%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 135,455
Percent: 75.4%
John McCain
Votes: 40,524
Percent: 22.6%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 960,165
Percent: 65.65%
Barack Obama
Votes: 502,496
Percent: 34.35%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 258,668
Percent: 78.4%
John McCain
Votes: 68,806
Percent: 20.9%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 215,429
Percent: 59.2%
John McCain
Votes: 141,922
Percent: 39.0%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 120,786
Percent: 55.7%
Barack Obama
Votes: 91,662
Percent: 42.2%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 196,557
Percent: 59.4%
Barack Obama
Votes: 131,114
Percent: 39.6%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 188,563
Percent: 51.1%
John McCain
Votes: 176,237
Percent: 47.8%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 176,065
Percent: 61.2%
John McCain
Votes: 108,045
Percent: 37.6%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 1,037,291
Percent: 56.75%
John McCain
Votes: 738,475
Percent: 40.4%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 210,959
Percent: 64.3%
Barack Obama
Votes: 111,829
Percent: 34.1%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 174,150
Percent: 56.2%
Barack Obama
Votes: 133,260
Percent: 43.0%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 178,632
Percent: 67.0%
Barack Obama
Votes: 82,786
Percent: 31.1%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 175,105
Percent: 61.4%
Barack Obama
Votes: 106,491
Percent: 37.3%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 182,750
Percent: 53.5%
John McCain
Votes: 155,947
Percent: 45.7%
2008 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 168,940
Percent: 52.3%
Barack Obama
Votes: 149,804
Percent: 46.4%
2008 GENERAL
Barack Obama
Votes: 3,276,363
Percent: 54.49%
John McCain
Votes: 2,655,885
Percent: 44.17%
2008 PRIMARY
John McCain
Votes: 95,378
Percent: 85.97%
Ron Paul
Votes: 15,561
Percent: 14.03%
2008 PRIMARY
John McCain
Votes: 42,788
Percent: 70.19%
Ron Paul
Votes: 10,072
Percent: 16.52%
Mike Huckabee
Votes: 4,328
Percent: 7.1%
2008 PRIMARY
John McCain
Votes: 87,460
Percent: 69.65%
Ron Paul
Votes: 29,785
Percent: 23.72%
2008 PRIMARY
John McCain
Votes: 142,918
Percent: 72.26%
Mike Huckabee
Votes: 16,388
Percent: 8.29%
Ron Paul
Votes: 13,427
Percent: 6.79%
Uncommitted
Votes: 10,755
Percent: 5.44%
2008 PRIMARY
John McCain
Votes: 285,881
Percent: 80.88%
Ron Paul
Votes: 51,100
Percent: 14.46%
2008 PRIMARY
John McCain
Votes: 118,876
Percent: 86.99%
Ron Paul
Votes: 17,772
Percent: 13.01%
2008 PRIMARY
John McCain
Votes: 90,469
Percent: 76.0%
Mike Huckabee
Votes: 12,310
Percent: 10.34%
Ron Paul
Votes: 5,969
Percent: 5.01%
2008 PRIMARY
John McCain
Votes: 320,318
Percent: 77.62%
Mike Huckabee
Votes: 41,173
Percent: 9.98%
Ron Paul
Votes: 31,612
Percent: 7.66%
2008 PRIMARY
John McCain
Votes: 383,085
Percent: 74.01%
Mike Huckabee
Votes: 63,018
Percent: 12.18%
Ron Paul
Votes: 37,260
Percent: 7.2%
2008 PRIMARY
John McCain
Votes: 595,175
Percent: 72.86%
Ron Paul
Votes: 129,323
Percent: 15.83%
Mike Huckabee
Votes: 92,430
Percent: 11.31%
2008 PRIMARY
John McCain
Votes: 113,074
Percent: 78.91%
Mike Huckabee
Votes: 17,943
Percent: 12.52%
2008 PRIMARY
John McCain
Votes: 656,687
Percent: 59.92%
Mike Huckabee
Votes: 335,356
Percent: 30.6%
2008 PRIMARY
John McCain
Votes: 17,480
Percent: 64.18%
Mike Huckabee
Votes: 5,847
Percent: 21.47%
Ron Paul
Votes: 1,777
Percent: 6.52%
2008 PRIMARY
John McCain
Votes: 697,767
Percent: 51.22%
Mike Huckabee
Votes: 518,002
Percent: 38.02%
2008 PRIMARY
John McCain
Votes: 28,417
Percent: 71.32%
Mike Huckabee
Votes: 5,698
Percent: 14.3%
Ron Paul
Votes: 2,635
Percent: 6.61%
2008 PRIMARY
John McCain
Votes: 262,304
Percent: 49.5%
Mike Huckabee
Votes: 127,657
Percent: 24.09%
Mitt Romney
Votes: 86,140
Percent: 16.25%
Ron Paul
Votes: 40,539
Percent: 7.65%
2008 PRIMARY
John McCain
Votes: 224,755
Percent: 54.74%
Mike Huckabee
Votes: 151,707
Percent: 36.95%
2008 PRIMARY
John McCain
Votes: 4,198
Percent: 67.59%
Mike Huckabee
Votes: 1,020
Percent: 16.42%
Ron Paul
Votes: 494
Percent: 7.95%
Mitt Romney
Votes: 398
Percent: 6.41%
2008 PRIMARY
John McCain
Votes: 176,046
Percent: 54.77%
Mike Huckabee
Votes: 91,608
Percent: 28.5%
Mitt Romney
Votes: 22,426
Percent: 6.98%
Ron Paul
Votes: 19,196
Percent: 5.97%
2008 PRIMARY
John McCain
Votes: 244,829
Percent: 50.04%
Mike Huckabee
Votes: 199,003
Percent: 40.67%
2008 PRIMARY
Mike Huckabee
Votes: 11,627
Percent: 59.58%
John McCain
Votes: 4,587
Percent: 23.5%
Ron Paul
Votes: 2,182
Percent: 11.18%
2008 PRIMARY
Mike Huckabee
Votes: 69,594
Percent: 43.18%
John McCain
Votes: 67,551
Percent: 41.91%
Mitt Romney
Votes: 10,222
Percent: 6.34%
Ron Paul
Votes: 8,590
Percent: 5.33%
2008 PRIMARY
John McCain
Votes: 333,001
Percent: 49.7%
Mitt Romney
Votes: 178,043
Percent: 26.57%
Mike Huckabee
Votes: 68,477
Percent: 10.22%
Ron Paul
Votes: 40,113
Percent: 5.99%
2008 PRIMARY
Mitt Romney
Votes: 33,288
Percent: 59.61%
John McCain
Votes: 10,621
Percent: 19.02%
Mike Huckabee
Votes: 7,266
Percent: 13.01%
Ron Paul
Votes: 4,670
Percent: 8.36%
2008 PRIMARY
Mike Huckabee
Votes: 227,766
Percent: 41.25%
John McCain
Votes: 204,867
Percent: 37.1%
Mitt Romney
Votes: 98,019
Percent: 17.75%
2008 PRIMARY
John McCain
Votes: 255,197
Percent: 47.1%
Mitt Romney
Votes: 186,838
Percent: 34.49%
Mike Huckabee
Votes: 48,849
Percent: 9.02%
2008 PRIMARY
John McCain
Votes: 78,836
Percent: 52.0%
Mitt Romney
Votes: 49,891
Percent: 32.91%
Mike Huckabee
Votes: 10,607
Percent: 7.0%
2008 PRIMARY
John McCain
Votes: 22,626
Percent: 45.04%
Mitt Romney
Votes: 16,344
Percent: 32.53%
Mike Huckabee
Votes: 7,706
Percent: 15.34%
2008 PRIMARY
Mike Huckabee
Votes: 326,874
Percent: 33.92%
John McCain
Votes: 304,751
Percent: 31.63%
Mitt Romney
Votes: 290,707
Percent: 30.17%
2008 PRIMARY
John McCain
Votes: 426,777
Percent: 47.45%
Mitt Romney
Votes: 257,265
Percent: 28.6%
Mike Huckabee
Votes: 148,053
Percent: 16.46%
Ron Paul
Votes: 45,055
Percent: 5.01%
2008 PRIMARY
Mitt Romney
Votes: 255,892
Percent: 51.12%
John McCain
Votes: 204,779
Percent: 40.91%
2008 PRIMARY
John McCain
Votes: 194,053
Percent: 32.91%
Mike Huckabee
Votes: 185,642
Percent: 31.49%
Mitt Romney
Votes: 172,329
Percent: 29.23%
2008 PRIMARY
John McCain
Votes: 313,459
Percent: 55.36%
Mitt Romney
Votes: 160,388
Percent: 28.33%
Mike Huckabee
Votes: 46,284
Percent: 8.17%
2008 PRIMARY
John McCain
Votes: 122,772
Percent: 36.64%
Mike Huckabee
Votes: 111,899
Percent: 33.4%
Mitt Romney
Votes: 83,030
Percent: 24.78%
2008 PRIMARY
Mike Huckabee
Votes: 190,904
Percent: 34.47%
John McCain
Votes: 176,091
Percent: 31.8%
Mitt Romney
Votes: 130,632
Percent: 23.59%
Ron Paul
Votes: 31,026
Percent: 5.6%
2008 PRIMARY
Mitt Romney
Votes: 264,956
Percent: 89.49%
John McCain
Votes: 15,931
Percent: 5.38%
2008 PRIMARY
Mike Huckabee
Votes: 138,557
Percent: 60.46%
John McCain
Votes: 46,343
Percent: 20.22%
Mitt Romney
Votes: 30,997
Percent: 13.53%
2008 PRIMARY
John McCain
Votes: 1,238,988
Percent: 42.25%
Mitt Romney
Votes: 1,013,471
Percent: 34.56%
Mike Huckabee
Votes: 340,669
Percent: 11.62%
2008 PRIMARY
Alan Keyes
Unopposed
Mitt Romney
Votes: 2,826
Percent: 52.03%
John McCain
Votes: 1,144
Percent: 21.06%
Ron Paul
Votes: 997
Percent: 18.36%
Mike Huckabee
Votes: 312
Percent: 5.74%
2008 PRIMARY
John McCain
Votes: 701,761
Percent: 36.0%
Mitt Romney
Votes: 604,932
Percent: 31.03%
Rudy Giuliani
Votes: 286,089
Percent: 14.68%
Mike Huckabee
Votes: 262,681
Percent: 13.47%
2008 PRIMARY
John McCain
Votes: 147,686
Percent: 33.15%
Mike Huckabee
Votes: 132,943
Percent: 29.84%
Fred Thompson
Votes: 69,651
Percent: 15.63%
Mitt Romney
Votes: 68,142
Percent: 15.3%
2008 PRIMARY
Mitt Romney
Votes: 338,316
Percent: 38.92%
John McCain
Votes: 257,985
Percent: 29.68%
Mike Huckabee
Votes: 139,764
Percent: 16.08%
Ron Paul
Votes: 54,475
Percent: 6.27%
2008 PRIMARY
John McCain
Votes: 88,713
Percent: 37.0%
Mitt Romney
Votes: 75,675
Percent: 31.56%
Mike Huckabee
Votes: 26,916
Percent: 11.22%
Rudy Giuliani
Votes: 20,344
Percent: 8.48%
Ron Paul
Votes: 18,346
Percent: 7.65%
2004 GENERAL
John McCain
Votes: 1,505,372
Percent: 77.0%
Stuart Starky
Votes: 404,507
Percent: 21.0%
2004 PRIMARY
John McCain
Unopposed
Prior Winning Percentages
2004 (77%); 1998 (69%); 1992 (56%); 1986 (60%); House: 1984 (78%); 1982 (66%)

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