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Diversity Roundup: Poll Finds Growing Enthusiasm Among Latino Voters Diversity Roundup: Poll Finds Growing Enthusiasm Among Latino Voters

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Diversity Roundup: Poll Finds Growing Enthusiasm Among Latino Voters

Portrait of the Just-Barely Middle Class: With new data showing poverty in the U.S. has risen, what has been forgotten are the families living just above the line, still struggling to make ends meet while living in middle-class America, the Washington Post reports.

Study Shows Middle-Class Success is Feasible: A new Brookings study shows that a child’s likelihood to enjoy a middle-class lifestyle is largely based on one’s circumstances starting at birth, but it also found that individuals who were determined to succeed at certain stages in life can do just that, according to the U.S. News and World Report.

Poll Finds Growing Enthusiasm Among Latino Voters: The majority of Latino registered voters--83 percent--say they are somewhat or very enthusiastic about voting this year, according to a new poll as reported on by NBC Latino. About 46 percent of Latinos are more enthusiastic this year, a jump from 29 percent increased enthusiasm in 2008, leading poll analysts to believe the oft-reported turnout gap may be starting to close.

The Meaning of Minority: As the minority groups--blacks, Hispanics and Asians--continue to grow, the meaning of “minority” becomes more murky. To explore what the meaning of race and minorities could mean in this new America, The Root interviewed Rep. Keith Ellison, D-Minn., the first Muslim Congressman.

Alabama Struggles to Fill Job Gaps in Agricultural Industry: The Alabama agricultural business has suffered since the state enacted strict immigration laws that sent many migrant workers fleeing the state and the workforce in high numbers. The state hailed the immigration laws and illegal workforce crackdown as a means to put Alabamians back to work, but instead caused a labor shortage, Bloomberg reports. To compensate, the industry has begun recruiting legal African, Haitian and Puerto Rican refugees who are willing to cope with the tough labor requirements that come with the job.

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