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The Best-Of: Roundup of National Journal News The Best-Of: Roundup of National Journal News

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The Best-Of: Roundup of National Journal News

Not All Cuts Are Created Equal
The final cuts in the budget deal struck last weekend are advertised as $38.5 billion, but Tim Fernholz crunches the numbers and finds, after removing rescissions, cuts to reserve funds, and reductions in mandatory spending programs, discretionary spending will be reduced only by $14.7 billion.
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The Public Rehabilitation of Stanley McChrystal
For the first time since his dismissal following comments made to a Rolling Stone reporter, Gen. Stanley McChrystal returns to public service, helping to oversee a program supporting military families. Accepting the invitation, the four-star general said it showed that there were no more hard feelings, for him or the White House. Jamie Tarabay reports.
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What Will Obama Say?
On Sunday, we heard that the president was about to lay out a new plan. By Monday, he was promising to call for a new plan. On Sunday, he already had a plan. On Monday, he wanted Republicans to help him write one. Clive Crook looks at the budget rock and a hard place the President has found himself between.
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Losing Track of 'Do Not Track'
A new consumer privacy bill unveiled by Sens. John Kerry and John McCain on Tuesday is already dividing consumer groups. The bill aims to protect consumer privacy, but some groups were furious that it does not include "do-not-track" provisions to give Internet users a one-stop approach to keeping their information private. Josh Smith reports.
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How Drug Cartels Infiltrate U.S. Agencies
As the U.S. Customs and Border Protection bureau has ratcheted up efforts to cope with the tide of crime sweeping across the Southwest border, Mexican cartels have stepped up efforts to infiltrate CBP and other federal, state and local agencies responsible for policing the border. Katherine McIntire Peters reports for Government Executive.
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