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Today’s e-Reads: Campaigns Embrace Mobile Giving Today’s e-Reads: Campaigns Embrace Mobile Giving Today’s e-Reads: Campaigns Embrace Mobile Giving Today’s e-Reads: Campai...

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Tech / TECHNOLOGY

Today’s e-Reads: Campaigns Embrace Mobile Giving

photo of Juliana Gruenwald
January 31, 2012

The New York Times examines growth in the use of mobile payment systems such as Square to help supporters collect donations for candidates.

A new survey of security officials commissioned by Bloomberg found that most experts said they would have to boost spending on cybersecurity by nine times what is now spent to prevent most attacks.

Bloomberg profiles Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg, who has become the public face of the social-networking service, a role on display last week when she served as cochairman of the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland.

 

President Obama took retail campaigning to a new level when he promised to look at the resume of an out-of-work semiconductor engineer during an online chat on Google’s social-networking service Google +, the Associated Press reports. Meanwhile, CNET says that during the same chat, Obama urged critics and supporters of controversial online-piracy legislation to find a workable compromise. National Journal's coverage of the chat is here.

The Wall Street Journal examines the potential competitive issues facing Verizon’s Fios television, telephone, and Internet service as its wireless unit teams up with Comcast to offer the same services, although in different markets for now.

The European Union has opened an antitrust investigation against Samsung; the probe will explore whether the company used patent battles to harm its competitors, according to Reuters.

An attorney for Megaupload appears to have bought more time for the data being stored on the file-sharing service, which is accused of promoting piracy by U.S. authorities, Mashable reports. And PCMag.com calls the mess a megafailure for cloud computing.

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