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Thompson resists calls to concede to de Blasio.

Sept. 13, 2013, 7:36 a.m.

After hold­ing a closed-door meet­ing with his key aides and sup­port­ers on Thursday night, former Comp­troller Bill Thompson (D) “again re­fused to con­cede a run­off un­til more votes are coun­ted.” Thompson: “It con­tin­ues to be­come clear­er and clear­er that there are tens of thou­sands of votes that are out there. We be­lieve that the votes should be coun­ted.”

Thompson de­cided to press for­ward “des­pite mount­ing pres­sure by oth­er uni­on of­fi­cials, Demo­crat­ic lead­ers — and even some of his former sup­port­ers — to drop his bid.”

Pub­lic Ad­voc­ate Bill de Bla­sio (D) “fin­ished Tues­day night hold­ing 40.3 per­cent of the vote, with 99 per­cent of pre­cincts re­port­ing — just a hair over the 40 per­cent threshold needed for him to avoid a run­off. But ac­cord­ing to the latest Board of Elec­tion tally, there are nearly 80,000 pa­per bal­lots yet to be coun­ted, in­clud­ing ab­sent­ee, mil­it­ary and emer­gency bal­lots filled out by voters whose names could not be found on the rolls.”

The Board of Elec­tion was sched­uled to “be­gin the stand­ard pro­cess of re-can­vassing vot­ing ma­chine totals” on Fri­day morn­ing, al­though the board won’t be­gin count­ing pa­per bal­lots un­til Monday. Thompson “has un­til Fri­day at mid­night to with­draw his name from the run­off, or he will ap­pear on the bal­lot”“no mat­ter what”“if Mr. de Bla­sio falls be­low 40 per­cent.” (Politick­er.com)

De Bla­sio needs roughly a third of the out­stand­ing bal­lots to clinch the nom­in­a­tion without a run­off. (New York Times)

DE BLA­SIO SHOWS OFF SUP­PORT: At a rally on the steps of City Hall on Thursday, de Bla­sio “was joined at the event by some erstwhile sup­port­ers of” City Coun­cil Speak­er Christine Quinn (D), who fin­ished third in the primary, and “at least two sup­port­ers of” of Thompson. (Cap­it­al New York)

At a press con­fer­ence on Thursday, Quinn said: “Im go­ing to en­thu­si­ast­ic­ally sup­port the Demo­crat­ic can­did­ate. And I think it’s clear to most folks that that per­son is Bill de Bla­sio.” (Wall Street Journ­al)

ON SECOND THOUGHT: May­or Mi­chael Bloomberg (I) “said on Fri­day morn­ing that he had de­cided not to make an en­dorse­ment in the gen­er­al elec­tion for may­or, a sur­prise an­nounce­ment in a cam­paign that has be­come something of a ref­er­en­dum on his leg­acy.” The an­nounce­ment ended weeks of spec­u­la­tion that Bloomberg might de­cide to en­dorse MTA chair­man Joe Lhota (R) be­cause of the ex­tent to which de Bla­sio has framed his cam­paign as a re­buke of Bloomberg’s policies. Bloomberg: “I don’t want to do any­thing that com­plic­ates it for the next may­or, and that’s one of the reas­ons I’ve de­cided I’m just not go­ing to make an en­dorse­ment in the race.” (New York Times)

GET­TING STAR­TED: Lhota and de Bla­sio “em­braced the role of fierce rivals on Thursday, dis­play­ing the testy ten­or and deep ideo­lo­gic­al di­vide of a gen­er­al elec­tion match­up even” as the Demo­crat­ic primary res­ults re­main un­of­fi­cial. Lhota prom­ised a “take­down” of de Bla­sio, ac­cus­ing the Demo­crat of di­vid­ing the city with his “tale of two cit­ies” cam­paign theme and of pro­mot­ing “a re­pu­di­ation of everything great that’s happened over the last 20 years.”

“It did not take long for Mr. de Bla­sio to fire back. Speak­ing at a cam­paign rally with labor sup­port­ers in Brook­lyn, he said his crit­ics had failed to ad­dress the most ser­i­ous eco­nom­ic is­sues fa­cing the city.” De Bla­sio: “Ac­cept­ance of in­equal­ity, turn­ing the oth­er way when there’s in­equal­ity, that’s not an Amer­ic­an value, and that’s not the val­ues of the city of New York.” (New York Times)
Kev­in Bren­nan

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