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Diane Barnes Diane Barnes

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Diane Barnes is a reporter with Global Security Newswire, having first joined the publication as a staff writer in 2007. She covers daily developments on Syria's chemical weapons, Iran's nuclear program, strategic arms control and other issues. Barnes has contributed to publications including the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, the Palm Beach Post and the London Daily Telegraph. She is a graduate of George Washington University.

Latest From Diane Barnes

Officials Question Readiness to Probe Nuclear Strikes

Dozens of officials and experts want to tighten global cooperation on analyzing atomic materials, partly to help identify perpetrators of possible nuclear strikes.

Watchdogs Press U.S. on Risks of Uranium-Processing Revamp

Activists are urging Washington to study possible risks from a plan for dispersing bomb-uranium activities that previously were to be housed in a single facility.

Syrian Chemical Factories May be Saved Under Global 'Compromise'

Syria's regime may be able to retain parts of its shuttered chemical-arms factories under "compromise" terms devised by a global watchdog.

U.S. Locks Down Smallpox Vials Found Forgotten in Closet

Smallpox, an eradicated scourge feared for its weapons potential, has turned up in forgotten vials at a U.S. government facility.

Biotech Breakthroughs May Put Chemical Arms in Easier Reach

An international team wants to closely watch how future technologies could make the world's deadliest poisons easier to produce and harder to regulate.

Will the U.S. Keep Buying Medicine for 'Black Swan' Attacks?

Congress will weigh this year whether to continue spending billions of dollars on antidotes for attacks seen as relatively unlikely, but potentially devastating.

U.S. Ship Departs to Pick Up Syria's Deadliest Chemical Arms

A specially equipped U.S. vessel departed from Spain on Wednesday to destroy the most dangerous warfare chemicals surrendered by Syria's government.

Show More from Diane Barnes

Officials Question Readiness to Probe Nuclear Strikes

Dozens of officials and experts want to tighten global cooperation on analyzing atomic materials, partly to help identify perpetrators of possible nuclear strikes.

Watchdogs Press U.S. on Risks of Uranium-Processing Revamp

Activists are urging Washington to study possible risks from a plan for dispersing bomb-uranium activities that previously were to be housed in a single facility.

Syrian Chemical Factories May be Saved Under Global 'Compromise'

Syria's regime may be able to retain parts of its shuttered chemical-arms factories under "compromise" terms devised by a global watchdog.

U.S. Locks Down Smallpox Vials Found Forgotten in Closet

Smallpox, an eradicated scourge feared for its weapons potential, has turned up in forgotten vials at a U.S. government facility.

Biotech Breakthroughs May Put Chemical Arms in Easier Reach

An international team wants to closely watch how future technologies could make the world's deadliest poisons easier to produce and harder to regulate.

Will the U.S. Keep Buying Medicine for 'Black Swan' Attacks?

Congress will weigh this year whether to continue spending billions of dollars on antidotes for attacks seen as relatively unlikely, but potentially devastating.

U.S. Ship Departs to Pick Up Syria's Deadliest Chemical Arms

A specially equipped U.S. vessel departed from Spain on Wednesday to destroy the most dangerous warfare chemicals surrendered by Syria's government.

Show More from Diane Barnes