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Alexia Fernández Campbell Alexia Fernández Campbell

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Alexia Fernández Campbell writes about immigration and demographics for National Journal's Next America project. She previously covered South Florida's immigrant and Latino communities for the South Florida Sun-Sentinel and the Spanish-language newspaper of The Palm Beach Post. Her work has appeared in the The Washington Post, the Los Angeles Times and the Chicago Tribune. Alexia has a master's degree in journalism and public affairs from American University and a bachelor's degree in communications from The University of Tennessee. She is fluent in Spanish and Portuguese.

Latest From Alexia Fernández Campbell

Raising a Daughter in a Detroit Squatting Community

These mostly white squatters have set up "Fireweed Universe City" in abandoned homes throughout a historically black neighborhood.

Detroit Is a Dream Come True for Iraqi Refugees

When you've grown up in Baghdad and been driven out of your home by militants, even America's most struggling city is a welcome sight.

The Detroit Entrepreneurs You Never Hear About

White millionaires are remaking downtown Detroit. But these small businesses are opening in the struggling neighborhoods where people live. 

'It's About as Dangerous Here Now as It Is in Mexico'

It took decades of work for this immigrant to buy his family a house in Detroit. Now he wonders if it will be the last one standing on his street. 

Who Wants to Live in Detroit?

Four decades after 'white flight' began, tens of thousands of African-Americans have now left as well. What does that mean for the city's future?

America's Largest Black Boarding School Sends 97 Percent of Students to College

This Mississippi school was founded to teach the illiterate children of freed slaves. It's still helping disadvantaged students.

The Culture Clash in Mississippi's Mosques

African-American Muslims who once preached black separatism have opened their mosques to all Muslims. It has been a bumpy ride.  

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