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Alexia Fernández Campbell Alexia Fernández Campbell

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Alexia Fernández Campbell writes about immigration and demographics for National Journal's Next America project. She previously covered South Florida's immigrant and Latino communities for the South Florida Sun-Sentinel and the Spanish-language newspaper of The Palm Beach Post. Her work has appeared in the The Washington Post, the Los Angeles Times and the Chicago Tribune. Alexia has a master's degree in journalism and public affairs from American University and a bachelor's degree in communications from The University of Tennessee. She is fluent in Spanish and Portuguese.

Latest From Alexia Fernández Campbell

Is This the End of the Line for Louisiana's Vietnamese Shrimpers?

When Vietnamese came to Louisiana, shrimping was a natural job for those with limited English and few other options. But after Hurrican Katrina and the Gulf oil spill, Vietnamese shrimpers have st...

The Last Benevolent Club Left in New Orleans Keeps Jazz Funerals Rollin’

Social aid groups, such as the Young Men Olympian Jr. Benevolent Association, once played a vital role in black New Orleans, providing a kind of health insurance and covering funeral expenses for ...

Is New Orleans Trying to Deport Undocumented Workers Now That the Rebuilding Is Over?

Federal contractors lured undocumented immigrants to New Orleans after Katrina. Now the city's Latinos want police and immigration agents to stop harassing them.

Blacks and Latinos in New Orleans Have Police Harassment in Common

Racial profiling and aggressive immigration enforcement is leading some African-Americans to find solidarity with the Latino workers they once resented.

Don't Call Mitch Landrieu the White Mayor of Black New Orleans

Landrieu has fought hard for racial unity in post-Katrina New Orleans. It's just the city's Latinos who aren't feeling much love.

New Orleans' Post-Katrina Identity Crisis

The Big Easy is back. But what does that mean now?

They Crossed the Border as Unaccompanied Minors to Reunite With Their Mom

"I was very, very scared. I came with people I didn't know."

Show More from Alexia Fernández Campbell

Is This the End of the Line for Louisiana's Vietnamese Shrimpers?

When Vietnamese came to Louisiana, shrimping was a natural job for those with limited English and few other options. But after Hurrican Katrina and the Gulf oil spill, Vietnamese shrimpers have st...

The Last Benevolent Club Left in New Orleans Keeps Jazz Funerals Rollin’

Social aid groups, such as the Young Men Olympian Jr. Benevolent Association, once played a vital role in black New Orleans, providing a kind of health insurance and covering funeral expenses for ...

Is New Orleans Trying to Deport Undocumented Workers Now That the Rebuilding Is Over?

Federal contractors lured undocumented immigrants to New Orleans after Katrina. Now the city's Latinos want police and immigration agents to stop harassing them.

Blacks and Latinos in New Orleans Have Police Harassment in Common

Racial profiling and aggressive immigration enforcement is leading some African-Americans to find solidarity with the Latino workers they once resented.

Don't Call Mitch Landrieu the White Mayor of Black New Orleans

Landrieu has fought hard for racial unity in post-Katrina New Orleans. It's just the city's Latinos who aren't feeling much love.

New Orleans' Post-Katrina Identity Crisis

The Big Easy is back. But what does that mean now?

They Crossed the Border as Unaccompanied Minors to Reunite With Their Mom

"I was very, very scared. I came with people I didn't know."

Show More from Alexia Fernández Campbell
 
 
 
 
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