Skip Navigation

Close and don't show again.

Your browser is out of date.

You may not get the full experience here on National Journal.

Please upgrade your browser to any of the following supported browsers:

Janell Ross Janell Ross

NEXT :
This ad will end in seconds
 
Close X

Not a member or subscriber? Learn More »

Forget Your Password?

Don't have an account? Register »

Reveal Navigation
 

 

Staff Bios

Janell Ross

Correspondent

jross@nationaljournal.com

Janell Ross covers political, social and economic issues connected to the country's demographic changes for National Journal's Next America project and also edits the Next America opinion page. Previously, she worked as a staff reporter covering political and economic issues at The Huffington Post, and she wrote about business, immigration, race, and social issues at The Tennessean in Nashville.

Janell has also covered local politics, labor, and higher education at both The News & Observer in Raleigh and the Corpus Christi Caller-Times. Her work has appeared on TheAtlantic.com, TheAtlanticCities.com, and TheRoot.com. She earned a bachelor's degree from Vassar College and a master's degree from the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism. 

Latest From Janell Ross

Does Exposure to Violence and Trauma Impact Students' Education Prospects?

In the wake of Ferguson, policymakers need to pay more attention to the challenges that community violence pose for teenagers and young adults.

Why Your Physician Is Most Likely to Be White or Asian

Racial disparities in medical schools and professions persist. But a storefront medical school in Harlem is working toward a solution.

Why Is Florida Ending Remedial Education for College Students?

Starting this fall, academically underprepared students at Florida's public universities no longer have to take classes designed to help them catch up.

Racial Power Imbalances in Ferguson Start Early

Black kids in Ferguson are underrepresented in gifted-and-talented classes but overrepresented among those suspended or arrested at school. 

Education Department Launches Review of the University of Phoenix

While the analysis of the nation's largest student financial aid recipient is standard practice, it comes at a time of increased scrutiny for the for-profit college sector.

Do Higher-Ed Policies Make It Harder for Low-Income College Students to Graduate?

Federal financial-aid programs usually cover only 12 credit hours per semester. That automatically puts students on a five-year graduation path.

School Is Over for the Summer. So Is the Era of Majority White U.S. Public Schools.

When schools reopen this fall, demographic changes will have tipped the balance to nonwhite students. 

Show More from Janell Ross

Does Exposure to Violence and Trauma Impact Students' Education Prospects?

In the wake of Ferguson, policymakers need to pay more attention to the challenges that community violence pose for teenagers and young adults.

Why Your Physician Is Most Likely to Be White or Asian

Racial disparities in medical schools and professions persist. But a storefront medical school in Harlem is working toward a solution.

Why Is Florida Ending Remedial Education for College Students?

Starting this fall, academically underprepared students at Florida's public universities no longer have to take classes designed to help them catch up.

Racial Power Imbalances in Ferguson Start Early

Black kids in Ferguson are underrepresented in gifted-and-talented classes but overrepresented among those suspended or arrested at school. 

Education Department Launches Review of the University of Phoenix

While the analysis of the nation's largest student financial aid recipient is standard practice, it comes at a time of increased scrutiny for the for-profit college sector.

Do Higher-Ed Policies Make It Harder for Low-Income College Students to Graduate?

Federal financial-aid programs usually cover only 12 credit hours per semester. That automatically puts students on a five-year graduation path.

School Is Over for the Summer. So Is the Era of Majority White U.S. Public Schools.

When schools reopen this fall, demographic changes will have tipped the balance to nonwhite students. 

Show More from Janell Ross