Skip Navigation

Close and don't show again.

Your browser is out of date.

You may not get the full experience here on National Journal.

Please upgrade your browser to any of the following supported browsers:

Sebastian Sprenger Sebastian Sprenger

This ad will end in seconds
 
Close X

Not a member? Learn More »

Forget Your Password?

Don't have an account? Register »

Reveal Navigation
 

 

Staff Bios

Sebastian Sprenger

Managing Editor, Global Security Newswire

ssprenger@nationaljournal.com

Sebastian Sprenger is managing editor of National Journal's Global Security Newswire, where he also reports primarily on chemical-weapons disarmament and WMD-cyber security. Before joining the Newswire, he led coverage of national-security policymaking and defense spending as chief editor of Inside the Pentagon, an independent investigative weekly. A native of Siegen, Germany, Sebastian got his start in journalism covering local news for the now-defunct Westfälische Rundschau in Kreuztal. He studied at Universität Trier and elsewhere.

Latest From Sebastian Sprenger

Q&A: Expert Wants Nuclear Plants Taken 'Off the Table' in Cyber-Warfare

One U.S. cybersecurity expert is arguing that world nations should jointly pledge they will spare civil nuclear facilities from computer attacks for humanitarian reasons.

White House Opposes House Missile-Defense Moves

Several defensive and offensive missile-themed provisions that originated in the Republican-controlled House have drawn opposition from the White House.

Issue Experts, Activists Decry U.S. 'Major Retreat' on Nuclear Security

A group of 100 former officials, peace advocates and issue experts criticized the White House for planning to cut nuclear security funding next year.

NATO Eyes Antimissile Gains in Surveillance-Plane Upgrades

NATO has begun initial deliberations for upgrading the alliance's surveillance-aircraft fleet, with an eye toward improving its missile-defense capabilities.

Pentagon Close to Selecting Specific Nuclear Cuts Under New START Limits

Pentagon leaders expect to soon give President Obama a plan for specific U.S. nuclear cuts to bring the arsenal in line with arms control caps.

China Sees 'Imbalance' in Japan's Plutonium Plans, Despite Upcoming Cuts

Some nonproliferation experts see risk in Japan's stockpiling of nuclear materials. The material, if stolen, could be used by terrorists to fashion atomic arms.

A Hague Summit Dispatch: From Scripted Press Briefs to Propaganda Videos

The Chinese delegation blames President Obama for snarling traffic in the Netherlands as reporters wait 45 minutes for a Beijing envoy's press conference to begin.

Show More from Sebastian Sprenger

Q&A: Expert Wants Nuclear Plants Taken 'Off the Table' in Cyber-Warfare

One U.S. cybersecurity expert is arguing that world nations should jointly pledge they will spare civil nuclear facilities from computer attacks for humanitarian reasons.

White House Opposes House Missile-Defense Moves

Several defensive and offensive missile-themed provisions that originated in the Republican-controlled House have drawn opposition from the White House.

Issue Experts, Activists Decry U.S. 'Major Retreat' on Nuclear Security

A group of 100 former officials, peace advocates and issue experts criticized the White House for planning to cut nuclear security funding next year.

NATO Eyes Antimissile Gains in Surveillance-Plane Upgrades

NATO has begun initial deliberations for upgrading the alliance's surveillance-aircraft fleet, with an eye toward improving its missile-defense capabilities.

Pentagon Close to Selecting Specific Nuclear Cuts Under New START Limits

Pentagon leaders expect to soon give President Obama a plan for specific U.S. nuclear cuts to bring the arsenal in line with arms control caps.

China Sees 'Imbalance' in Japan's Plutonium Plans, Despite Upcoming Cuts

Some nonproliferation experts see risk in Japan's stockpiling of nuclear materials. The material, if stolen, could be used by terrorists to fashion atomic arms.

A Hague Summit Dispatch: From Scripted Press Briefs to Propaganda Videos

The Chinese delegation blames President Obama for snarling traffic in the Netherlands as reporters wait 45 minutes for a Beijing envoy's press conference to begin.

Show More from Sebastian Sprenger