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Norm Ornstein Norm Ornstein

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Norm Ornstein is a contributing editor and columnist for National Journal. His weekly columns also appear on TheAtlantic.com.

He spent 30 years as an election-eve analyst for CBS News, until he moved to be the on-air analyst for BBC News in 2012. For two decades, prior to joining National Journal, he wrote a weekly column called "Congress Inside Out" for Roll Call. He has written for The New York Times, The Washington Post, Wall Street Journal, Foreign Affairs, and other major publications, and regularly appears on television programs like The NewsHour with Jim Lehrer, Nightline, and Charlie Rose. At the 30th Anniversary party for The NewsHour, he was recognized as the most frequent guest over the thirty years.

His many books include The Permanent Campaign and Its Future; Intensive Care: How Congress Shapes Health Policy, both with Thomas E. Mann; and Debt and Taxes: How America Got Into Its Budget Mess and What to Do About It, with John H. Makin. The Broken Branch: How Congress Is Failing America and How to Get It Back on Track, co-authored by Tom Mann, was published in August 2006 by Oxford University Press, with an updated edition in August 2008. It was picked both by The Washington Post and the St. Louis Post-Dispatch as one of the best books of 2006. He and Tom Mann are co-authors of The New York Times bestseller It’s Even Worse Than It Looks: How the American Constitutional System Collided With the New Politics of Extremism, which was named Book of the Year by Ezra Klein’s Wonkblog, one of the ten best books on politics in 2012 by The New Yorker, and one of the best books of the year by The Washington Post.

In addition to his roles at National Journal and The Atlantic, Norm serves as resident scholar at the American Enterprise Institute for Public Policy Research.

Latest From Norm Ornstein

Will Congress Use Executive Order on Immigration as Excuse for More Gridlock?

I hope President Obama issues his order but delays its effective date until early next year, giving the House one last chance to do something on the issue. 

'Alpha House' Blends Its Political Satire With Humanity

I come away from the show feeling not naked contempt for the pols but sympathy for the pushes, pulls, and pressures that come with their jobs.

Plunging Oil Prices Set Off a Global Chess Game

Huge implications of a lower cost per barrel will make John Kerry's job even tougher.

A Republican Senate Victory Could Splinter the Party

The tension between setting out a positive agenda for governing and the pressure to continue to block and obstruct will be very, very high.

What If Independents Keep Senate Majority Status in Flux?

Imagine if they aligned to form a Centrist Caucus, providing the votes needed to top 50 percent in return for commitments on a list of priorities.

Our Downward Spiral Since Citizens United

The corrosive influence of unlimited money in politics continues to grow.

Trust Is Not Enough to Break Through Washington Gridlock

Reality check: The bigger problems aren't because individuals don't get along; they're because of larger factors in the political culture.

Show More from Norm Ornstein

Will Congress Use Executive Order on Immigration as Excuse for More Gridlock?

I hope President Obama issues his order but delays its effective date until early next year, giving the House one last chance to do something on the issue. 

'Alpha House' Blends Its Political Satire With Humanity

I come away from the show feeling not naked contempt for the pols but sympathy for the pushes, pulls, and pressures that come with their jobs.

Plunging Oil Prices Set Off a Global Chess Game

Huge implications of a lower cost per barrel will make John Kerry's job even tougher.

A Republican Senate Victory Could Splinter the Party

The tension between setting out a positive agenda for governing and the pressure to continue to block and obstruct will be very, very high.

What If Independents Keep Senate Majority Status in Flux?

Imagine if they aligned to form a Centrist Caucus, providing the votes needed to top 50 percent in return for commitments on a list of priorities.

Our Downward Spiral Since Citizens United

The corrosive influence of unlimited money in politics continues to grow.

Trust Is Not Enough to Break Through Washington Gridlock

Reality check: The bigger problems aren't because individuals don't get along; they're because of larger factors in the political culture.

Show More from Norm Ornstein