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Brian Resnick is a staff correspondent at National Journal. Before joining, Brian spent a year at The Atlantic as a fellow, where he produced content and wrote for TheAtlantic.com. In addition to The Atlantic, his writing has been featured in Popular Mechanics and The News Journal, Delaware's main daily newspaper. Brian graduated cum laude from the University of Delaware in 2011 with a B.A. in psychology. In college, he served as a managing editor for the student newspaper, The Review, and received the E.A Nickerson award for excellence in journalism. He comes from Long Island, New York.

Latest From Brian Resnick

Harry Reid Will Not Seek Reelection in 2016

The Nevada Democrat said Friday his recent accident put things into perspective, but he warned his Republican colleagues not to get too excited.

Behind the Viral Campaign to Put a Woman on the $20 Bill

A New York businesswoman has sunk her retirement savings on the chance to change the twenty. Already, she says it's been worth it.

Is This the End of Lethal Injection in America?

Firing squads and nitrogen asphyxiation: The ever shrinking supply of lethal injection drugs is forcing states to adopt old (and new) execution methods. 

Is Hillary Clinton’s Famous Name Boosting Her in Early 2016 Polls?

The psychological power of a familiar name.

Barbara Bush: 'I Changed My Mind!' on Another Bush Presidency

The former first lady has gone from "We've had enough Bushes" to fundraising for Jeb's future campaign.

Can You Place These Historic D.C. Photos on the Map?

Let's see how well you know your D.C. history and geography.

Measles May Rise in Ebola's Wake

The epidemic disrupted already weak health care systems. One potential consequence: 127,000 cases of measles.

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