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Brian Resnick is a staff correspondent at National Journal. Before joining, Brian spent a year at The Atlantic as a fellow, where he produced content and wrote for TheAtlantic.com. In addition to The Atlantic, his writing has been featured in Popular Mechanics and The News Journal, Delaware's main daily newspaper. Brian graduated cum laude from the University of Delaware in 2011 with a B.A. in psychology. In college, he served as a managing editor for the student newspaper, The Review, and received the E.A Nickerson award for excellence in journalism. He comes from Long Island, New York.

Latest From Brian Resnick

White House: President Obama Would Sign a Short-Term DHS Funding Bill

White House Press Secretary Josh Earnest on Friday urged the House to pass a clean DHS funding bill, and not a stopgap measure.

CPAC Sound Bites: Listen to What Top Conservatives Are Saying

A soundboard of the 2015 Conservative Political Action Conference.

It’s So Cold You Could Walk Across Lake Erie

95 percent of the lake's surface is frozen. But don't get any big ideas.

Why George Zimmerman Won't Face Federal Charges

Federal prosecutors had to prove he willfully targeted Trayvon Martin because of his race.

Would You Buy a Genetically Modified Apple that Doesn’t Go Brown?

Such a product recently cleared federal regulatory hurdles.

Liberals Doubt Science, Too

Republicans like Scott Walker trip over questions on evolution. But there are science topics liberals will feel uncomfortable accepting. It has nothing to do with intelligence—it just comes wit...

Jon Stewart's Greatest Legacy Is in the Middle East

The comedian's brand of satire has become a model for comedians in countries where speech isn't free.

Show More from Brian Resnick