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Troops and Their Dogs -- PICTURES Troops and Their Dogs -- PICTURES

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Defense / national security

Troops and Their Dogs -- PICTURES

April 18, 2012

Sen. Charles Schumer, D-N.Y, held a celebration for former Marine Cpl. Megan Leavey and her K-9 companion Stg. Rex, a German shepherd wounded in Iraq, on Sunday, April 15. Leavey spent over five years trying to adopt Rex, but bureaucratic hurdles stood in her way until Schumer intervened. Schumer is trying to streamline the process for adopting retired military dogs.

Below are images of the bond between military dogs and their handlers, and the important role they both play in our armed forces.

In this photo provided by Senator Charles Schumer’s Office, Schumer, right, joins Marine Corps veteran Corporal Megan Leavey and “Sgt. Rex,” a military working dog that she partnered with to locate improvised explosive devices during her tour in Iraq, during at a news conference in New York, Sunday, April 15, 2012. Schumer held a homecoming celebration at his office Sunday for Sgt. Rex, a German shepherd wounded in Iraq, and the dog's handler, former Cpl. Megan Leavey, who was injured in the same incident in 2006. Leavey had been trying to adopt Rex for five years but was stymied by bureaucracy until Schumer intervened. The New York senator is pushing a bill that would speed up the adoptions.(Senator Charles Schumer’'s Office/AP)

In this Sept. 14, 2011 photo, U.S. Marine dog handlers Lance Cpl. Erik Batlle, left, wearing a "bite suit," and Cpl. Russel Beckley, train with Beckley's Military working Dog Rico, at Camp Leatherneck, Helmand province. Handlers and their dogs, that sniff for explosives or narcotics or track down wanted persons, patrol together, day after day. Sometimes, they sleep side by side in military cots. They face the same dangers together. (Brennan Linsley/AP)

In this photo provided by Senator Charles Schumer’s Office, Schumer joins Marine Corps veteran Corporal Megan Leavey at a news conference in New York, Monday, March 19, 2012. Schumer has made it possible for Leavey to adopt “Sgt. Rex,” a military working dog that she partnered with to locate improvised explosive devices during her tour in Iraq. “Sgt. Rex is in the photo that Leavey is holding. (Senator Charles Schumer’'s Office/AP)

 

In this Sept. 14, 2011 photo, U.S. Marine dog handler Lance Cpl. Erik Batlle trains with his Military Working Dog Tasli, at Camp Leatherneck, Helmand province. Handlers and their dogs, that sniff for explosives or narcotics or track down wanted persons, patrol together, day after day. Sometimes, they sleep side by side in military cots. They face the same dangers together.(Brennan Linsley/AP)

In this Sept. 8, 2011 photo, U.S. Marine dog handler Sgt. Mark Behl, left, of the 3rd Marine Expeditionary Force K9 unit, and another Marine, perform first aid on U.S. Military working dog Drak, after he was wounded in a bomb attack, in Sangin, Helmand province, Afghanistan. Drak's own handler, Sgt Kenneth A. Fischer, was also wounded in the bomb attack, which also killed several civilians. Both Fischer and Drak were flown out of the country for surgery and recovery. Eventually, in line with military custom, Fischer will adopt Drak and take him home. (Brennan Linsley/AP)

In this photo taken Thursday, July 29, 2010, Gina, a highly trained bomb-sniffing dog with the U.S. military, joins Staff Sgt. Chris Kench on a sofa at the kennel at Peterson Air Force Base in Colorado Springs. Gina was a playful 2-year-old German shepherd when she went to Iraq but months of door-to-door searches and noisy explosions left her cowering and fearful. After she came home to Peterson Air Force Base in June 2009, a military veterinarian diagnosed her with post-traumatic stress disorder. (Ed Andrieski/AP)

 

In this photo taken Thursday, July 29, 2010, Staff Sft. Melinda Miller hugs Gina after a workout on an obstacle course at Peterson Air Force Base in Colorado Springs, Colo. Gina was a playful 2-year-old German shepherd when she went to Iraq as a highly trained bomb-sniffing dog with the U.S. military, but months of door-to-door searches and noisy explosions left her cowering and fearful. After she came home to Peterson Air Force Base in June 2009, a military veterinarian diagnosed her with post-traumatic stress disorder.(Ed Andrieski/AP)

In this undated image released by Animal Planet, Marine Cpl. Jonathan Eckert of Oak Lawn, Illinois, rests with his improvised explosive device sniffing dog, Bee, while on patrol in Afghanistan during the filming of "Glory Hounds." The series stars the military working dogs that serve beside their human partners in Iraq and Afghanistan. From tracking insurgents to sniffing out explosives, these heroic canines are an integral component of the armed forces _ and share deep emotional bonds with their human companions.(Animal Planet/AP)

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