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Pointing Fingers: Who's Blaming Whom in the Super Committee?—PICTURES Pointing Fingers: Who's Blaming Whom in the Super Committee?—PICTURE...

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Super Committee: The Deficit Dozen / Super Committee

Pointing Fingers: Who's Blaming Whom in the Super Committee?—PICTURES

photo of Chris Heller
November 21, 2011

Call it Sunday, Guilty Sunday. The day before the deficit super committee announced that it did not reach a deal to cut at least $1.2 trillion from the federal budget, six members flocked to Sunday talk shows to begin the blame game. In the gallery below, we've collected the gripes.

Super-committee Cochair Patty Murray, D-Wash., blamed "one sticking divide," the Bush tax cuts, for the group's inability to agree on a plan. "That is the issue of what I call shared sacrifice, where everybody contributes in a very challenging time for our country," the senator said on CNN's State of the Union on Sunday. "I believe strongly that we still have the capacity to come together to solve this problem," Murray added. "If the super committee can’t do it, then I hope that Congress will."(J. SCOTT APPLEWHITE/AP)

On Fox News Sunday, super-committee Cochair Jeb Hensarling, R-Texas, suggested that the super committee's failures lie in disagreements between Republican and Democrat members about Medicare, Medicaid, and health care. "Unfortunately," the representative said, "what we haven’t seen in these talks from the other side is any Democrats willing to put a proposal on the table that actually solves the problems." While Hensarling claimed that he wasn't "assigning blame," he also expressed frustration with the negotiation process. "It’s a little hard for us to negotiate with them when they’re still negotiating with themselves," he said.(J. SCOTT APPLEWHITE/AP)

Sen. John Kerry, D-Mass., didn't split hairs on NBC's Meet the Press on Sunday. "There’s one thing standing between us and avoiding a sequester and doing $1.2 trillion, and that one thing is the Republican unwillingness to now push for the Bush tax cuts to be extended now,” he said, also adding, "We are not a tax-cutting committee. We’re a deficit-reduction committee."(ALEX BRANDON/AP)

 

Also on Meet the Press, Senate Minority Whip Jon Kyl, R-Ariz., pointed his finger back toward Democrats. "Nothing new came out of this," he said. "From the Democratic side, it was the same thing: Raise taxes, pass the president’s jobs bill, no entitlement reform."(CHET SUSSLIN)

Rep. Xavier Becerra, D-Calif., chose to defend what Democrats proposed. "Every plan that Democrats have put forward has included cuts to entitlement programs. Some deeper, the bigger the deal. Some smaller," he said, adding, "You can’t say you’re going to take benefits away from services that people have paid for, like Social Security and Medicare, and not ask the wealthiest Americans.”(J. SCOTT APPLEWHITE/AP)

Sen. Pat Toomey, R-Pa., kept the dance alive on CBS's Face The Nation. "There was an insistence that we have a trillion-dollar tax increase," he said, chiding the Democrats. "There was an unwillingness to cut any kind of spending at all unless there was a huge tax increase.”(HARRY HAMBURG/AP)

 
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