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3 Charts That Show How Hard It Is for Women to Find Work 3 Charts That Show How Hard It Is for Women to Find Work

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3 Charts That Show How Hard It Is for Women to Find Work

Since 2007, women between the ages of 26 and 40 have had difficulties finding work, no matter their race.

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Cristine Perez works on customers' order at the Geek Squad area of the Best Buy store on April 21, 2010 in Miami.(Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

The recession was not kind to women.

New data from Remapping Debate, a nonprofit public policy organization, outline key employment figures of different demographics from January 2007 to today.

 

In the years following the economic downturn in 2007, women between the ages of 26 and 40 with high school degrees have struggled to find work, no matter their race. Remapping Debate outlined employment data from black, white, and Hispanic women, using numbers from the U.S. Census Bureau and the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Employment for each group of women has decreased substantially: More than 50 percent of these women were fully employed in 2007; today, that number is below 50 percent.

Black Women

The number of full-time black women with high school degrees has steadily fallen, from 59.85 percent in January 2007 to 47.86 percent in March 2014.

 

While many of these women do have jobs, the real shift in employment is coming from the number of women leaving the workforce and the number of women seeking part-time work. According to these data, 8.79 percent of these women were employed in part-time jobs in January 2007. That number is now 13.83 percent.

Hispanic Women

Full employment for Hispanic women with high school degrees seems to have flatlined in recent years, hovering around its current 44-percent mark. Many of those women are either unemployed or have left the workforce altogether.

White Women

While the number of unemployed white women in this age and education group has seen some improvement in recent years, it still hasn't recovered from January 2007.

As with black and Hispanic women with high school degrees between 26 and 40, the number of white women in this group who have left the workforce increased substantially in recent years, going from 28.10 percent in 2007 to 32.29 percent now.

 

That leaves the number of fully employed women in this demographic at 47.28 percent, well below its original level.

So, what does this all mean for women in the workforce?

The typical American making minimum wage is 35 years old and providing half of the income for his or her family, according to the Economic Policy Institute. Additionally, many single mothers fall within this age and education group.

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Considering where many of these women are financially, it seems that the ones who are providing the most are doing the worst.

Don't Miss Today's Top Stories

Excellent!"

Rick, Executive Director for Policy

Concise coverage of everything I wish I had hours to read about."

Chuck, Graduate Student

The day's action in one quick read."

Stacy, Director of Communications

I find them informative and appreciate the daily news updates and enjoy the humor as well."

Richard, VP of Government Affairs

Chock full of usable information on today's issues. "

Michael, Executive Director

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