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The Next Economy

Big Questions

Unequal Until the End

The Predictable Misery of Unpredictable Work

The 17 percent of workers who deal with erratic scheduling tend to be those who can afford instability the least.  

This Is Where White People Live

Self-segregation and clustered affluence is now normal in America. Why do policymakers only worry about concentrated poverty?

What Education Can and Can't Do for Economic Inequality

A new study looks at whether or not a college degree can chip away at income disparities.

Why Is It So Hard to Find Jobs for Disabled Workers?

Disability Insurance provides a much-needed safety net for nine million Americans, but basic structural flaws mean that many never work again.

Stuck With a House That Can't Be Sold

Even though the housing market is improving, some owners with troubled properties won't see relief anytime soon.

What the Great Recession Taught Us about Long-Term Unemployment

If you lose your job at the height of an economic downturn, even a college degree doesn't help.

What Does 27 Weeks of Unemployment Do To A Person?

Though the economy is improving, a third of those still looking for work have been jobless for more than six months.

How Federal Workers Pinch Pennies When the Government Shuts Down

Government shutdowns may be all about politics, but they can have very real consequences for federal employees.

Why Don't More Americans Move Away From Home?

Fewer than half of Americans say they're likely to relocate, even if they think their town is headed in the wrong direction.

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About The Next Economy

The Great Recession upended expectations about economic security in the United States, and it changed the way we work and live. The Next Economy project asks: How are Americans adapting to the new economy? This joint initiative from the Atlantic and National Journal will use polls, an annual special issue, national and local events with thought leaders and this site to answer that question.