Skip Navigation

Close and don't show again.

Your browser is out of date.

You may not get the full experience here on National Journal.

Please upgrade your browser to any of the following supported browsers:

Aerial attacks stoke fears among refugees in Yida, South Sudan Aerial attacks stoke fears among refugees in Yida, South Sudan

NEXT :
This ad will end in seconds
 
Close X

Not a member or subscriber? Learn More »

Forget Your Password?

Don't have an account? Register »

Reveal Navigation
 

 

Document Library

Aerial attacks stoke fears among refugees in Yida, South Sudan

Issued By
April 12, 2014

Briefing Notes, 11 April 2014

This is a summary of what was said by UNHCR spokesperson Melissa Fleming - to whom quoted text may be attributed - at the press briefing, on 11 April 2014, at the Palais des Nations in Geneva.

UNHCR is deeply concerned about the safety of refugees and aid workers in Yida, South Sudan, after unidentified aircraft circled over the settlement several times on 9 April. The sighting raised fears that the refugee settlement may soon come under direct or indirect military attack.

 

The incident came just two days after the aerial bombardment of Neem, a community 26 kilometres north of Yida and close to the disputed border area of Jau. Local authorities reported that on 7 April a suspected military aircraft dropped more than five bombs over Neem, which is on the road that refugees use when coming from the war-torn Nuba Mountains in Sudan. However, according to our information, refugees have not been directly affected this week's attack.

Yida, a spontaneous settlement sheltering 70,000 Sudanese refugees, has come under aerial attack before. In November 2011, two bombs fell within the camp, including one close to a school for refugee children. Yida is located in the north of Unity State, close to the highly militarized Jau corridor.

With the ongoing conflict in South Sudan, Pariang County - where Yida is located - has seen increased militarization by regular and irregular armed groups. Shifting conflict lines leave refugees exposed to serious protection risks, including gender-based violence.

For more than two years, UNHCR and the South Sudan Commission for Refugee Affairs have been advocating for the relocation of refugees to safer areas inside South Sudan. National authorities are aware of the protection concerns, and agree with UNHCR and NGOs that the civilian character of the camp cannot be maintained in Yida.

Nevertheless, refugee leaders have been reluctant to move, citing proximity to their homeland as well as similarity in soil composition, vegetation and other topographical features.

In March last year, a model refugee settlement was established in Ajuong Thok, further from the disputed border zone, and the Government of South Sudan decreed that no new arrivals should be registered in Yida. Donor support enabled the construction of primary and secondary schools as an incentive for refugees to relocate voluntarily.

However, refugees in Yida have been slow to accept the offer. While the population of Ajuong Thok crossed the 10,000 mark in March, most residents are new arrivals from South Kordofan state in Sudan, where there have been reports of increased bombardment in Nuba Mountains and school closures due to insecurity.

Since January, UNHCR and its partners have relocated an average of 300 new arrivals per week to Ajuong Thok. Increasing numbers of refugees registered in Yida (up to 100 per week) are signing up for relocation.

South Sudan is now hosting more than 540,000 refugees, mostly in Unity and Upper Nile states. These areas, together with Jonglei state, are the ones worst affected by violence and forced displacement in the war in South Sudan are also hosting over 800,000 internally displaced persons.

For more information on this topic, please contact:

  • In Juba, South Sudan: Teresa Ongaro, mobile: +211 927 770 040
  • In Geneva, Fatoumata Lejeune on mobile +41 79 249 34 83

UNHCR country pages

South Sudan Crisis: Urgent Appeal

Donate now and help to provide emergency aid to tens of thousands of people fleeing into South Sudan to escape violence.

Donate to this crisis

Displacement in South Sudan: A Camp Within a Camp

In the three weeks since South Sudan erupted in violence, an estimated 200,000 South Sudanese have found themselves displaced within their own country. Some 57,000 have sought sanctuary at bases of UN peace-keepers across the country. These photos by UNHCR's Senior Regional Public Information Officer Kitty McKinsey give a glimpse of the daily life of the 14,000 displaced people inside the UN compound known locally as Tong Ping, near the airport in Juba, South Sudan's capital. Relief agencies, including UNHCR, are rallying to bring shelter, blankets and other aid items, but in the first days, displaced people had to fend for themselves. The compounds have taken on all the trappings of small towns, with markets, kiosks, garbage collection and public bathing facilities. Amazingly, children still manage to smile and organize their own games with the simplest of materials.

Displacement in South Sudan: A Camp Within a Camp

Emergency food distribution in South Sudan's Jonglei state

Humanitarian organizations in South Sudan are working to deliver emergency assistance to some of the tens of thousands of people displaced by armed conflict in Jonglei state. Most of those uprooted have fled into the bush or have walked for days to reach villages away from the fighting. Others have journeyed even greater distances to find sanctuary in the neighbouring countries of Kenya, Ethiopia and Uganda. Gaining access to those affected in an insecure and isolated area has been a significant challenge for aid workers. Since mid-July, an airlift has been providing food supplies to families living in two previously inaccessible villages and where humanitarian agencies have established temporary bases. As part of the "cluster approach" to humanitarian emergencies, which brings together partners working in the same response sector, UNHCR is leading the protection cluster to ensure the needs of vulnerable individuals among the displaced are addressed.

Emergency food distribution in South Sudan's Jonglei state

Thousands of refugees moved before the rains hit South Sudan

Since the beginning of May, an operation has been under way in South Sudan to move more than 18,000 Sudanese refugees to a newly built camp. Six days a week, around 500 people are transported from the Jamam camp in Upper Nile state to a recently constructed site called Kaya. South Sudan's long and intense rainy season will soon begin in earnest and the operation will move the refugees from a location prone to severe flooding to one designed to remain accessible and functional during the downpours. The rains leave large areas of the country cut off by flood waters for months. Residents of Jamam are assisted to move their household belongings and are allotted a plot of land on arrival in Kaya, where UNHCR partners have established schools and medical facilities. Newly arrived refugees from Sudan are also brought to Kaya, where they are provided with relief items and shelter. UNHCR's Tim Irwin was there with …

distributed by noodls logo

This document was issued by UNHCR - Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees and was initially posted at www.unhcr.org. It was distributed, unedited and unaltered, by noodls on 2014-04-12 19:12:10. The original document issuer is solely responsible for the accuracy of the information contained therein.

Search the document library
What's This?
X
What's This?

The new National Journal Document Library is a collection of research reports, testimony, white papers and press releases regularly updated from hundreds of sources including governmental agencies, global think tanks, trade associations, academic institutions and companies. National Journal Members have full access to the Document Libraryfull access to the Document Library and its advanced search and alerting features. Non-members can access up to five documents per month.

Job Board
Search Jobs
Outside Sales Representative
National Federation of Independent Businesses | Toledo, OH
Chief Geoscientist
American Society of Civil Engineers
Technical Manager
American Society of Civil Engineers | Elk Grove Village, IL
FA System Tech with NICET Level II and/or valid FA License
American Society of Civil Engineers | Killeen, VA
Summer Internship
American Society of Civil Engineers | Troy, MI
Code Development Administrator
American Society of Civil Engineers | Ontario, CA
Designer/Drafter
American Society of Civil Engineers | Newington, CT
Business Web Application Developer
American Society of Civil Engineers | Troy, MI
Landscape Architecture/Construction Internship
American Society of Civil Engineers
Production Engineer Co-op
American Society of Civil Engineers | Lewisburg, TN
Quality Intern
American Society of Civil Engineers
International Business Development Coordinator
American Society of Civil Engineers | Farmington Hills, MI
Certification Administrator
American Society of Civil Engineers | Durham, NC
Office Engineers
American Society of Civil Engineers | Glassboro, NJ
Civil Engineering Intern
American Society of Civil Engineers | San Diego, CA
 
Comments
comments powered by Disqus