Insurance Helps Young People Detect Cancer in Time”“Study

Researchers find young people without coverage are more likely to get advanced cancer diagnoses.

PANORAMA CITY, CA - JANUARY 28: Dr. Jason Greenspan (L) and emergency room nurse Junizar Manansala care for a patient in the ER of Mission Community Hospital where doctors held a press conference outside on a class action lawsuit against the state of California by a coalition of emergency room physicians claiming that without additional funding, the entire emergency healthcare system is on the verge of collapse on January 28, 2009 in Panorama City, California. According to the coalition, the cost of providing emergency room treatment has nearly doubled over the past decade and patient load increased by more than 28 percent while Medi-Cal reimbursements have remained largely unchanged. During that time, 85 California hospitals in California have closed and an additional 55 facilities have shut down their emergency rooms. California now reportedly ranks worst in the nation for access emergency care and last in emergency rooms per capita. California has seven emergency rooms per million people while the national average is 20 emergency rooms per million people. 
National Journal
Clara Ritger
Feb. 25, 2014, 12:05 a.m.

Health in­sur­ance is key to de­tect­ing can­cer be­fore it’s too late, even among young people.

That’s the con­clu­sion of a new Amer­ic­an Can­cer So­ci­ety study that found un­in­sured young adults are up to twice as likely to get late-stage can­cer dia­gnoses than their peers with private in­sur­ance.

The ACS sampled roughly 260,000 Amer­ic­ans ages 15 to 39 who were dia­gnosed with can­cer between 2004 and 2010.

Among the sample, wo­men without in­sur­ance were nearly twice as likely as those with private in­sur­ance to get late-stage dia­gnoses, while un­in­sured men were 1.5 times as likely to re­ceive late-stage can­cer dia­gnoses as their privately in­sured peers. Pa­tients who re­ceive late-stage can­cer dia­gnos­is — ones in which the can­cer is de­tec­ted only after it has spread to mul­tiple parts of the body — are less likely to sur­vive than those who are dia­gnosed earli­er.

Pub­lic-policy ini­ti­at­ives to ex­pand ac­cess to and re­duce the cost of health in­sur­ance — such as the Af­ford­able Care Act — could save lives as can­cer is iden­ti­fied and treated earli­er for newly in­sured pa­tients, ACS re­search­ers ar­gue.

“The Af­ford­able Care Act, with its fo­cus on in­creas­ing private in­sur­ance cov­er­age of young adults and provid­ing cer­tain can­cer screen­ings at no cost to pa­tients, has the po­ten­tial to make a big im­pact on this age group,” ACS Dir­ect­or of Health Ser­vices Re­search An­thony Rob­bins said in a press re­lease. Rob­bins is the lead au­thor of the study.

Un­in­sured pa­tients were young­er, more likely to be male, more likely to be black or His­pan­ic, and more likely to reside in the South, ac­cord­ing to the study. The re­search­ers also found that minor­it­ies were more likely to have ad­vanced can­cer at the time of dia­gnos­is.

While hav­ing private in­sur­ance in­creased the like­li­hood that can­cer would be caught early, Medi­care and Medi­caid pa­tients were found to have about the same res­ults as un­in­sured pa­tients, troub­ling stat­ist­ics for poli­cy­makers as they look to ex­pand ac­cess to the pro­grams across the coun­try. More re­search must be done to con­firm those find­ings, the ACS said, as some pa­tients be­come newly and ret­ro­act­ively eli­gible for those pro­grams be­cause of a can­cer dia­gnos­is.

The find­ings are con­sist­ent with pri­or ACS re­search on the link between in­sur­ance status and can­cer dia­gnoses, which has found that pa­tients without in­sur­ance have a high­er like­li­hood of ad­vanced can­cer dia­gnos­is among the whole adult pop­u­la­tion and high­er like­li­hood of ad­vanced breast can­cer among wo­men.

What We're Following See More »
TAKING A LONG VIEW TO SOUTHERN STATES
In Dropout Speech, Santorum Endorses Rubio
1 days ago
THE DETAILS

As expected after earlier reports on Wednesday, Rick Santorum ended his presidential bid. But less expected: he threw his support to Marco Rubio. After noting he spoke with Rubio the day before for an hour, he said, “Someone who has a real understanding of the threat of ISIS, real understanding of the threat of fundamentalist Islam, and has experience, one of the things I wanted was someone who has experience in this area, and that’s why we decided to support Marco Rubio.” It doesn’t figure to help Rubio much in New Hampshire, but the Santorum nod could pay dividends down the road in southern states.

Source:
‘PITTING PEOPLE AGAINST EACH OTHER’
Rubio, Trump Question Obama’s Mosque Visit
1 days ago
WHY WE CARE

President Obama’s decision to visit a mosque in Baltimore today was never going to be completely uncontroversial. And Donald Trump and Marco Rubio proved it. “Maybe he feels comfortable there,” Trump told interviewer Greta van Susteren on Fox News. “There are a lot of places he can go, and he chose a mosque.” And in New Hampshire, Rubio said of Obama, “Always pitting people against each other. Always. Look at today – he gave a speech at a mosque. Oh, you know, basically implying that America is discriminating against Muslims.”

Source:
THE TIME IS NOW, TED
Cruz Must Max Out on Evangelical Support through Early March
1 days ago
WHY WE CARE

For Ted Cruz, a strong showing in New Hampshire would be nice, but not necessary. That’s because evangelical voters only make up 21% of the Granite State’s population. “But from the February 20 South Carolina primary through March 15, there are nine states (South Carolina, Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Kentucky, Mississippi, and North Carolina) with an estimated white-Evangelical percentage of the GOP electorate over 60 percent, and another four (Texas, Kansas, Louisiana, and Missouri) that come in over 50 percent.” But after that, he better be in the catbird’s seat, because only four smaller states remain with evangelical voter majorities.

Source:
CHRISTIE, BUSH TRYING TO TAKE HIM DOWN
Rubio Now Winning the ‘Endorsement Primary’
1 days ago
WHY WE CARE

Since his strong third-place finish in Iowa, Marco Rubio has won endorsement by two sitting senators and two congressmen, putting him in the lead for the first time of FiveThirtyEight‘s Endorsement Tracker. “Some politicians had put early support behind Jeb Bush — he had led [their] list since August — but since January the only new endorsement he has received was from former presidential candidate Sen. Lindsey Graham.” Meanwhile, the New York Times reports that fueled by resentment, “members of the Bush and Christie campaigns have communicated about their mutual desire to halt … Rubio’s rise in the polls.”

Source:
ARE YOU THE GATEKEEPER?
Sanders: Obama Is a Progressive
20 hours ago
THE LATEST

“Do I think President Obama is a progressive? Yeah, I do,” said Bernie Sanders, in response to a direct question in tonight’s debate. “I think they’ve done a great job.” But Hillary Clinton wasn’t content to sit out the latest chapter in the great debate over the definition of progressivism. “In your definition, with you being the gatekeeper of progressivism, I don’t think anyone else fits that definition,” she told Sanders.

×