Skip Navigation

Close and don't show again.

Your browser is out of date.

You may not get the full experience here on National Journal.

Please upgrade your browser to any of the following supported browsers:

Reveal Navigation

Mexico Holds Six Suspected in Radioactive-Material Theft Mexico Holds Six Suspected in Radioactive-Material Theft Mexico Holds Six Suspected in Radioactive-Material Theft Mexico Holds Six Suspecte...

share
This ad will end in seconds
 
Close X

Not a member? Learn More »

Forget Your Password?

Don't have an account? Register »

Reveal Navigation
 

 

Global Security Newswire

Mexico Holds Six Suspected in Radioactive-Material Theft

December 9, 2013

Mexican authorities on Friday said six people were in custody on suspicion of involvement in last week's theft of a truck carrying a now-recovered supply of a highly radioactive substance, the New York Times reported.

The group included two men suspected of stealing the radioactive cobalt-60, as well as four possible collaborators, according to officials in Mexican state of Hidalgo. It was uncertain how police tied the group to the case, and it remained unclear whether the suspects could have deliberately targeted the potential radiological "dirty bomb" ingredient.

A 16-year-old boy in the group was showing symptoms of possible radiation poisoning, such as vomiting. Observers predicted dire health consequences for the thieves last week, after the cobalt was found abandoned outside its protective casing on Wednesday. Health personnel, though, released all six suspects into police custody from a medical site located roughly 60 miles north of Mexico City.

 

A civil protection office said no signs of radiation exposure have yet emerged among locals in Hueypoxtla, where the cobalt turned up, CNN reported on Saturday. Authorities restricted access for more than a quarter-mile around the site of the material, according to Juan Eibenschutz, head of Mexico's National Commission of Nuclear Safety and Safeguards.

The government's lack of special technology to handle the material means the process of clearing it up could drag out for weeks, Eibenschutz said. Mexico could reach out to Canada, the United States or the International Atomic Energy Agency for assistance, according to CNN.

This article was published in Global Security Newswire, which is produced independently by National Journal Group under contract with the Nuclear Threat Initiative. NTI is a nonprofit, nonpartisan group working to reduce global threats from nuclear, biological, and chemical weapons.

This article was published in Global Security Newswire, which is produced independently by National Journal Group under contract with the Nuclear Threat Initiative. NTI is a nonprofit, nonpartisan group working to reduce global threats from nuclear, biological, and chemical weapons.

Get us in your feed.
 
Comments
comments powered by Disqus