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Miriam Sapiro, Deputy Miriam Sapiro, Deputy Miriam Sapiro, Deputy Miriam Sapiro, Deputy

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2013 Manufacturing, Trade & Workforce / White House: U.S. Trade Representative

Miriam Sapiro, Deputy

(Richard A. Bloom)

Sapiro, 52, is a top trade negotiator for the U.S. She directs negotiations and oversees enforcement with Europe, the Middle East, North Africa, and the Americas. Working closely with the White House and Congress, Sapiro had an integral part in breaking the logjam on recent major trade agreements with Colombia, Panama, and South Korea. Sapiro will play a leading role in trade negotiations with the European Union under the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership, which Obama announced in his State of the Union in February. "There's no shortage of work," she said. "We are very committed to using every opportunity that we can to create trade opportunities that can lead to greater economic growth for the U.S. that can support and create more jobs at home." Sapiro has had a long, high-profile career in international affairs. She began as a lawyer in the State Department's Office of the Legal Adviser. In 1995, under then-Secretary of State Warren Christopher, Sapiro served in the policy planning staff, where she helped negotiate the peace accords that ended the war in Bosnia. She served as special assistant to President Clinton and counselor for Southeast European stabilization and reconstruction. She also served as a director of European affairs at the National Security Council. She grew up in Scarsdale, N.Y., and has a J.D. from New York University School of Law and a B.A. from Williams College.

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