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The Shift Of King Coal The Shift Of King Coal

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On The Trail

The Shift Of King Coal

The coal industry still dominates in Appalachia, and that's bad news for the Democratic party.

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(AP Photo/Seth Perlman)

When West Virginia Sen. Jay Rockefeller formally announced his decision to quit the Senate on Friday, he opened the next chapter in one of the few true historic shifts taking place in American politics. Even before his announcement, Republicans were eyeing his seat as a prime pickup opportunity, a reflection of the ascendance of the Republican Party in Appalachia, a shift in which working-class white voters who have reliably cast ballots for Democratic politicians for the better part of a century are moving inexorably, and perhaps permanently, toward the Republican Party.

That's because in Appalachia, coal is still king.

 

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