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ON THE TRAIL

Obama at Arm’s Length

But Democrats’ efforts to distance themselves from the president clearly have their limits.

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Radioactive: Obama losing friends.(Sara D. Davis/Getty Images)

Every time a special election hands one party control of another party’s open seat, the refrain rings throughout Washington: The winners crow that a new tide is sweeping in. The losers insist the results are an anomaly that has little bearing on the larger national narrative.

In the case of Republican Bob Turner’s unexpected, and unexpectedly large, win in New York’s 9th District on Tuesday, the winners have a better case than the losers. In the Democrats’ defense, they did have a lousy candidate who seemed to shoot himself in the foot at will. But if Democrats hide behind that excuse, they are missing the blaring Klaxons that should wake the party up to the danger it faces.

 

Republicans’ big special-election wins in New York and in Nevada’s 2nd District, where Mark Amodei won by a huge 22-point margin, are but single data points in larger sets that spell trouble for Democrats.

The party missed an opportunity to take back Wisconsin’s state Senate in August. The Democratic National Committee was outraised by its Republican counterpart last month by more than $2 million, even with President Obama’s Chicago birthday celebration. Obama’s approval ratings hit new lows this week in Bloomberg and CNN surveys even as he hit the road to sell a jobs plan that, as a complete package, has no realistic chance of passing a Republican-controlled House. Obama’s approval ratings have even fallen below 50 percent in California, according to a poll out this week.

The economy has stubbornly refused to provide any serious good news, as unemployment hovers at politically fatal heights. And Obama’s getting it from both sides. Every proposal that comes out of the White House is met with some of the sharpest criticism from within the president’s own party: Centrists like Sens. Mary Landrieu said this week that the jobs bill is a political stunt, while liberals don’t believe the package goes far enough.

 

Perhaps the biggest problem for Democrats facing reelection next year is that Obama himself has become an effective albatross for Republicans to hang around the party’s candidates. In both New York and Nevada, Republican winners encouraged voters to send a message to the White House, signaling perhaps the GOP’s most effective argument in 2012.

Democrats have yet to figure out how to distance themselves from their unpopular president. Voting against his signature initiatives doesn’t work. Trying to out-conservative your opponent hasn’t succeeded. Even admitting, as then-Rep. Gene Taylor did in late 2010, that he had voted for John McCain for president wasn’t enough to save the conservative Democrat from being swept out on the Republican tide.

That’s further proof that voters now judge candidates less by their positions and ideologies and more by their party identifications. Voters are acting as if the U.S. is a parliamentary democracy, in which party matters most, rather than a republican democracy in which members of Congress routinely vote against their own parties (largely, of course, because ideologically homogenous members of Congress no longer routinely vote against their own parties).

It should also serve as a loud warning for Democrats. Putting distance between themselves and Obama is logical when he is unpopular. It’s just not working as an electoral tactic yet.

 

West Virginia Becomes a Race

The four governorships up for election in 2011 were supposed to be sleepy affairs. Republicans in Kentucky nominated a flawed candidate who is unlikely to compete strongly against Gov. Steve Beshear. Democrats didn’t even field a candidate against Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal. And Mississippi Lt. Gov. Phil Bryant looks like he’s cruising in his quest to replace outgoing Gov. Haley Barbour.

But, quietly, Republicans are beginning to view West Virginia as a pickup opportunity. Acting Gov. Earl Ray Tomblin, a Democrat, is leading Republican businessman Bill Maloney by a narrowing margin, and national groups are spending money to help Maloney close that gap.

It is a mistake to view West Virginia as a red state despite its performance in recent presidential elections. No Republican has won a full Senate term there since Chapman Revercomb in 1948.

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Voters cast ballots differently in gubernatorial elections, which are driven by local issues, than they do in national elections. A West Virginia Democrat, in short, is much different from a national Democrat. For evidence, just look at Sen. Joe Manchin’s voting record and his campaign rhetoric, which included an ad in which he literally shot up cap-and-trade legislation.

But both sides admit that Tomblin, a longtime state senator who ascended to the governorship when Manchin took his Senate seat, now holds a lead in the high single digits. The Republican Governors Association has hammered Tomblin for his association with a dog track that has made millions since he backed pro-gambling legislation.

This article appears in the September 15, 2011 edition of NJ Daily.

Don't Miss Today's Top Stories

Chock full of usable information on today's issues."

Michael, Executive Director

Concise coverage of everything I wish I had hours to read about."

Chuck, Graduate Student

The day's action in one quick read."

Stacy, Director of Communications

Great way to keep up with Washington"

Ray, Professor of Economics

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