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Attorney Goes Global in New York Tribe's Fight With U.S.

Syracuse lawyer Joe Heath petitions the Organization of American States on behalf of the Onondaga Nation.

How a McKinley-Era Policy Could Affect a Key Senate Race

Both candidates seeking to replace Max Baucus want to change a 1900 law to help the Northern Cheyenne—and win over the tribe's voters.

Nuclear Bomb Variant Completes Wind-Tunnel Test

A project to revamp the U.S. B-61 nuclear bomb achieved a key milestone when one of its new variants passed a first full-scale, wind-tunnel test.

New Algorithm May Help Airport Scans Detect Nuclear Smuggling

Scientists may have discovered how they can reprogram X-ray scanners to more effectively spot bomb-usable nuclear materials in airline bags.

Obama's EPA Notches Big Win in Court on Power-Plant Rule

Appeals Court maintains high-profile mercury rule, but the regulation still faces legal concerns.

Salt Lake City

Salt Lake City's Secret to Escaping the Recession

With the LDS Church's financing of a huge downtown development, "in Salt Lake, the cranes kept moving," says Mayor Ralph Becker.

Audit Finds Obstacles to Operating U.S. Antimissile Assets in Europe

A new audit has found that the U.S. military is likely to encounter hurdles in the operations of deployed antimissile assets in Europe.

College Board/National Journal Poll

Black and Hispanic Adults Are More Optimistic About Quality of Local Schools

Poll finds minorities—particularly those without college degrees—are most likely to believe local schools prepare kids for college.

Playing the Name Game for 2016

The key question is not who will run, but what the intrinsic value of Democratic and Republican nominations will be.

Winners and Losers in the Money Race

McConnell, Landrieu, and Hagan do well. Begich and Walsh, not so much.

Greens Fear a Fracking Obsession on the Campaign Trail

With Pennsylvania's candidates for governor laser-focused on natural gas, there's little room left to discuss renewable energy.

Republicans' Attack on the White House Proves Obama's Point

The administration's transparency means critics can shame them for any gender-related discrepancies in pay. And that's a good thing.

Google Knew About Heartbleed and Didn’t Tell the Government

Federal systems remained vulnerable to hackers even after researchers identified the bug.

Space Lasers Will Beam Astronauts’ Superfast Video

"It's like upgrading from dial-up to DSL."

The FBI Thinks It Can Pass Off Downtown D.C. as Shanghai

The bureau turned to a Northern Virginia production company to make a film warning American students of becoming spies while studying abroad—and made us cringe in the process.

Snowden's Journalist Friends Win Pulitzer for NSA Reporting

Is a Nobel Peace Prize next for the leaker-in-chief?

Republicans Are Openly Softening Their Tone on Same-Sex Marriage

But they have a tricky line to walk.

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Nuclear Bomb Variant Completes Wind-Tunnel Test

A project to revamp the U.S. B-61 nuclear bomb achieved a key milestone when one of its new variants passed a first full-scale, wind-tunnel test.

New Algorithm May Help Airport Scans Detect Nuclear Smuggling

Scientists may have discovered how they can reprogram X-ray scanners to more effectively spot bomb-usable nuclear materials in airline bags.

Obama's EPA Notches Big Win in Court on Power-Plant Rule

Appeals Court maintains high-profile mercury rule, but the regulation still faces legal concerns.

Salt Lake City

Salt Lake City's Secret to Escaping the Recession

With the LDS Church's financing of a huge downtown development, "in Salt Lake, the cranes kept moving," says Mayor Ralph Becker.

Audit Finds Obstacles to Operating U.S. Antimissile Assets in Europe

A new audit has found that the U.S. military is likely to encounter hurdles in the operations of deployed antimissile assets in Europe.

College Board/National Journal Poll

Black and Hispanic Adults Are More Optimistic About Quality of Local Schools

Poll finds minorities—particularly those without college degrees—are most likely to believe local schools prepare kids for college.

Playing the Name Game for 2016

The key question is not who will run, but what the intrinsic value of Democratic and Republican nominations will be.

Winners and Losers in the Money Race

McConnell, Landrieu, and Hagan do well. Begich and Walsh, not so much.

Greens Fear a Fracking Obsession on the Campaign Trail

With Pennsylvania's candidates for governor laser-focused on natural gas, there's little room left to discuss renewable energy.

Republicans' Attack on the White House Proves Obama's Point

The administration's transparency means critics can shame them for any gender-related discrepancies in pay. And that's a good thing.

Google Knew About Heartbleed and Didn’t Tell the Government

Federal systems remained vulnerable to hackers even after researchers identified the bug.

Space Lasers Will Beam Astronauts’ Superfast Video

"It's like upgrading from dial-up to DSL."

The FBI Thinks It Can Pass Off Downtown D.C. as Shanghai

The bureau turned to a Northern Virginia production company to make a film warning American students of becoming spies while studying abroad—and made us cringe in the process.

Snowden's Journalist Friends Win Pulitzer for NSA Reporting

Is a Nobel Peace Prize next for the leaker-in-chief?

Republicans Are Openly Softening Their Tone on Same-Sex Marriage

But they have a tricky line to walk.

Boston Debates Banning Deadliest Pathogens From New Biolab

Boston is set this week to debate whether to ban a new, downtown biodefense laboratory from studying some of the world's deadliest disease agents.

Look Up, America: There's a 'Blood Moon' Tonight

Fingers crossed for cloudless skies for this rare celestial phenomenon.

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