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Benghazi Select Committee to Meet With Victims' Families This Week

"If they have questions that are still out there, I think we want to know what those questions are," ranking Democrat says.

It's Up to the Senate to Save You From Sunburns

The House just passed legislation to improve U.S. sunscreen technology.    

Congress Reaches Pre-Recess Compromise With Deal on Veterans Affairs Scandal

House and Senate negotiators announced legislation Monday to address allegations of mismanagement of veterans' medical care.

A Brief History of Acting U.S. Presidents and What Colons Have to Do With It

California needs acting governors whenever the real one leaves the state. The U.S. has only needed acting presidents when the real ones get colonoscopies.

The Senate Has a New Plot to Thwart NSA Spying

A reworked bill in the Senate being introduced this week is renewing confidence among anti-surveillance crusaders still hollering for reform.

Medicare's Finances Are Getting Better

Maybe Medicare spending won't break the bank, after all—or at least not as quickly as we thought.

How Your Cereal Causes Climate Change

General Mills announces a major new commitment to tackle global warming.

OkCupid Brags About Experimenting on Users

The dating site thinks the controversy over Facebook's manipulation of users' emotions is overblown.

Will Free Online Courses Ever Replace a College Education?

MOOCs haven't stolen students away from brick-and-mortar universities. Instead, they've become a genre of their own.

A Virginia Court Has Struck Down the State's Same-Sex Marriage Ban

The federal appeals decision upholds a February ruling that found the ban violated the Constitution's equal protection clause.

Hispanic Congregation Revives Historic Baptist Church in South Carolina

A white Baptist church reaches out to its new neighbors in Spartanburg's "Little Mexico."  

How Lasers and 3-D Maps Can Help the U.S. Prepare for Climate Change

The U.S. Geological Survey's laser-generated 3-D map is looking to revolutionize flood preparation.

Why Benjamin Netanyahu Should Be Very, Very Worried

Israel's defense is vulnerable to more than missiles as demographic and social changes threaten its global story.

Gay Marriage and the Political Psychology of Disgust

Why is it that some react to the LGBT community with the same emotions we use for rotting food? Scientists are starting to figure it out. 

Many Hurdles in the Race to Recess

Congress will try to deal with the border crisis, VA reform, and a host of other issues before adjourning for the summer on Thursday.

EPA Chief Won't Ditch the Waters Rule, But She Is Digging for Answers

Gina McCarthy is reaching out to critics in the farm community and pledging to respond to their concerns.

The One 2014 Primary Highlighting the Democratic Divide

Democrats have mostly avoided high-profile primary fights this year. But the one in Rhode Island highlights the differences across wings of the party.

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Benghazi Select Committee to Meet With Victims' Families This Week

"If they have questions that are still out there, I think we want to know what those questions are," ranking Democrat says.

It's Up to the Senate to Save You From Sunburns

The House just passed legislation to improve U.S. sunscreen technology.    

Congress Reaches Pre-Recess Compromise With Deal on Veterans Affairs Scandal

House and Senate negotiators announced legislation Monday to address allegations of mismanagement of veterans' medical care.

A Brief History of Acting U.S. Presidents and What Colons Have to Do With It

California needs acting governors whenever the real one leaves the state. The U.S. has only needed acting presidents when the real ones get colonoscopies.

The Senate Has a New Plot to Thwart NSA Spying

A reworked bill in the Senate being introduced this week is renewing confidence among anti-surveillance crusaders still hollering for reform.

Medicare's Finances Are Getting Better

Maybe Medicare spending won't break the bank, after all—or at least not as quickly as we thought.

How Your Cereal Causes Climate Change

General Mills announces a major new commitment to tackle global warming.

OkCupid Brags About Experimenting on Users

The dating site thinks the controversy over Facebook's manipulation of users' emotions is overblown.

Will Free Online Courses Ever Replace a College Education?

MOOCs haven't stolen students away from brick-and-mortar universities. Instead, they've become a genre of their own.

A Virginia Court Has Struck Down the State's Same-Sex Marriage Ban

The federal appeals decision upholds a February ruling that found the ban violated the Constitution's equal protection clause.

Hispanic Congregation Revives Historic Baptist Church in South Carolina

A white Baptist church reaches out to its new neighbors in Spartanburg's "Little Mexico."  

How Lasers and 3-D Maps Can Help the U.S. Prepare for Climate Change

The U.S. Geological Survey's laser-generated 3-D map is looking to revolutionize flood preparation.

Why Benjamin Netanyahu Should Be Very, Very Worried

Israel's defense is vulnerable to more than missiles as demographic and social changes threaten its global story.

Gay Marriage and the Political Psychology of Disgust

Why is it that some react to the LGBT community with the same emotions we use for rotting food? Scientists are starting to figure it out. 

Many Hurdles in the Race to Recess

Congress will try to deal with the border crisis, VA reform, and a host of other issues before adjourning for the summer on Thursday.

EPA Chief Won't Ditch the Waters Rule, But She Is Digging for Answers

Gina McCarthy is reaching out to critics in the farm community and pledging to respond to their concerns.

The One 2014 Primary Highlighting the Democratic Divide

Democrats have mostly avoided high-profile primary fights this year. But the one in Rhode Island highlights the differences across wings of the party.

Show More
 
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