Skip Navigation

Close and don't show again.

Your browser is out of date.

You may not get the full experience here on National Journal.

Please upgrade your browser to any of the following supported browsers:

Judge Allows Challenge to Google Privacy Penalty Judge Allows Challenge to Google Privacy Penalty

This ad will end in seconds
Close X

Not a member? Learn More »

Forget Your Password?

Don't have an account? Register »

Reveal Navigation

 

Tech

Judge Allows Challenge to Google Privacy Penalty

August 29, 2012

A federal judge has allowed a public interest group to challenge a $22.5 million fine Google agreed to pay earlier this month to settle allegations that it violated a consent decree it reached last year with the Federal Trade Commission related to violations of its privacy policies.

The court ruled Tuesday that Consumer Watchdog, which has long been a thorn in the side of Google, has the right to challenge the $22.5 million penalty. The group must file its challenge by Sept. 21, the judge said.

In announcing the penalty earlier this month, the FTC said Google had violated last year's privacy settlement by bypassing the privacy settings of users of Apple's Safari Internet browser in order to track them for advertising.

Consumer Watchdog blasted the latest settlement as far too low and said Google should be required to admit guilt.

"Google executives want to buy their way out of trouble with what for them is pocket change and then deny doing anything wrong," John Simpson, Consumer Watchdog's Privacy Project director, said in a statement. "Allowing this settlement undercuts the entire regulatory process. Companies and their executives must be held accountable when they violate legal agreements."

Google, however, is far from alone in not acknowledging any wrong doing in reaching a deal with regulators. Companies that settle charges with regulators rarely if ever admit to wrongdoing because it could expose them to further legal challenges, legal experts say.

In legal briefs filed with the federal court in San Francisco, neither Google nor the FTC took a position on Consumer Watchdog's motion to challenge the penalty.

LIKE THIS STORY? Sign up for Tech Edge

Sign up for our daily newsletter and stay on top of tech coverage.

Sign up form for Tech Edge
Job Board
Search Jobs
Outside Sales Representative
National Federation of Independent Businesses | Poughkeepsie, NY
Membership Sales Representative
National Federation of Independent Businesses | Saint Paul, MN
Outside Sales Representative
National Federation of Independent Businesses | Spencer, IA
Outside Sales Representative
National Federation of Independent Businesses | Meridian, MS
Outside Sales Representative
National Federation of Independent Businesses | Bremerton, WA
Outside Sales Representative
National Federation of Independent Businesses | Redmond, WA
Outside Sales Representative
National Federation of Independent Businesses | St. George, UT
Outside Sales Representative
National Federation of Independent Businesses | Fairbanks, AK
Outside Sales Representative
National Federation of Independent Businesses | Middletown, NY
Business Development Sales Representative
National Federation of Independent Businesses | Clovis, NM
Outside Sales Representative
National Federation of Independent Businesses | Claremont, NH
Outside Sales Representative
National Federation of Independent Businesses | New Albany, IN
Outside Sales Representative
National Federation of Independent Businesses | ME
Outside Sales Representative
National Federation of Independent Businesses | Alpena, MI
Outside Sales Representative
National Federation of Independent Businesses | Lake City, FL
Comments
comments powered by Disqus