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News Roundup: Rangel's Victory Souring? NEA's Membership Falls News Roundup: Rangel's Victory Souring? NEA's Membership Falls News Roundup: Rangel's Victory Souring? NEA's Membership Falls News Roundup: Rangel's Vi...

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Blogs / Influence

News Roundup: Rangel's Victory Souring? NEA's Membership Falls

July 3, 2012

Good morning and welcome to the Alley. Let's dive in and take a look at what's going on around the Web today.

New York Democratic Rep. Charlie Rangel's recent primary victory does not seem quite as sweet--or perhaps certain--as it did on election night, reports The New York Times. "A week ago, he was celebrating his victory in a five-way Democratic primary in which he sought the nomination for a 22nd term in Congress. But now that victory -- particularly significant because it came after Mr. Rangel was censured by his colleagues for ethical violations -- is being overshadowed as his margin of victory has been revised downward and his main challenger questioned whether he had won at all," writes the Times's Kate Taylor.

A major teachers union, the National Education Association, is bleeding members and revenue, reports USA Today. "The National Education Association (NEA) has lost more than 100,000 members since 2010. By 2014, union projections show, it could lose a cumulative total of about 308,000 full-time teachers and other workers, a 16% drop from 2010. Lost dues will shrink NEA's budget an estimated $65 million, or 18%. NEA calls the membership losses "unprecedented" and predicts they may be a sign of things to come," writes Greg Toppo.

The Hill's Russell Berman examines the window of time Congress has left between now and November and what the members could get done, including the farm bill, the Violence Against Women Act, postal reform, and appropriations. "Congress has been surprisingly productive during the first half of 2012 on bills ranging from highways to student loans to a ban on insider trading for lawmakers. But most on Capitol Hill believe that trend is in jeopardy," he writes.

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