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Exclusive: New YG Network Poll Shows Majority Favor Health Reform Repeal Exclusive: New YG Network Poll Shows Majority Favor Health Reform Repe...

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Influence

Exclusive: New YG Network Poll Shows Majority Favor Health Reform Repeal

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Sen. Mike Lee, R-Utah, talks to journalists outside the Supreme Court after it ruled to uphold key parts of the Arizona immigration law on Monday, June 25, 20112.(Chet Susslin)

Updated: 10:59 a.m. | Published: 6 a.m.

A majority of Americans want the health care law completely or partially repealed and think the federal government should not be able to force citizens to buy insurance, according to a new poll from the YG Network, a center-right issues advocacy group whose senior staff are former aides to Republican House Majority Leader Eric Cantor.

With the Supreme Court expected to rule on Thursday on the 2010 Affordable Care Act, the poll offers a glimpse into how Americans view the legislation. 

The poll, conducted between June 19 and June 21 by GOP pollsters McLaughlin & Associates surveyed 1,000 people with a margin of error of plus or minus 3.1 percentage points. Respondents were split almost evenly in terms of their politics. Thirty-two percent were Republicans; 34 percent were Democrats and 29 percent were independents; 4.5 percent didn't know or refused to reply. 

The survey sometimes referred to the Affordable Care Act as "Obamacare," a term often used by critics of the law. The poll also tested a number of Republican talking points.

AP120620035952.jpg

A combined 58 percent of respondents either want the health care law repealed entirely or the individual mandate lifted. Forty-nine percent say they will be upset if the law is left as is while 43 percent say they would not be bothered if the law stands. Nearly 46 percent believe it would be good for them if the court repeals the law.

What about the so-called individual mandate?

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Most Americans--nearly 73 percent--say the federal government should not be allowed to force citizens to buy insurance or face a penalty.

Most Americans--92 percent of respondents--said they are satisfied with their health care coverage, and 90 percent report that their health care costs have gone up or stayed the same since the passage of the health care bill.

If the court strikes down the law, a majority of Americans don't want the Congress to tackle health care before November's elections.

Fifty-seven percent say that Congress should wait until after the election to replace parts of the health care law if the high court repeals it, but 35 percent say Congress should act immediately.

Read the poll's topline questions here

Read the cross tabs here

Read an accompanying PowerPoint here. 

People walk up the steps at the U.S. Supreme Court Wednesday, June 20, 2012 in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

Don't Miss Today's Top Stories

Excellent!"

Rick, Executive Director for Policy

Concise coverage of everything I wish I had hours to read about."

Chuck, Graduate Student

The day's action in one quick read."

Stacy, Director of Communications

I find them informative and appreciate the daily news updates and enjoy the humor as well."

Richard, VP of Government Affairs

Chock full of usable information on today's issues. "

Michael, Executive Director

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