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How It Played: GOP Senate Hopefuls at the Convention How It Played: GOP Senate Hopefuls at the Convention How It Played: GOP Senate Hopefuls at the Convention How It Played: GOP Senate...

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Politics

How It Played: GOP Senate Hopefuls at the Convention

August 29, 2012

A few Senate candidates had their moments in the spotlight at the Republican National Convention Tuesday: Texas nominee Ted Cruz, Nebraska nominee Deb Fischer, and North Dakota nominee Rick Berg all spoke during the first day's program. Here's a quick look at the amount of coverage they got back home:

Cruz: The only Senate candidate to give a prime-time address Tuesday, the Texas candidate had by far the highest-profile speaking role. And the speech, in which he blasted President Obama and spoke to Hispanic voters, paid dividends back home -- Cruz got front-page treatment in the Houston Chronicle, San Antonio Express-News, and Austin American-Statesman.

Fischer: The state senator had a short, much lower profile speaking slot Tuesday, but did manage to snag a front-page story in the Lincoln Journal Star. Other papers, including the Omaha World-Herald, also covered her remarks. The brief speech focused on Nebraska's low unemployment rate, which she attributed in part to getting government "out of the way" and letting the private sector "do what it does best: grow our economy and create jobs."

Berg: The North Dakota congressman is in the tightest race of the three candidates -- while Cruz is a shoo-in and Fischer a heavy favorite, Berg is locked in a tight battle with Democratic nominee Heidi Heitkamp (the National Republican Senatorial Committee is making a $3.1 million ad buy in the state). He also garnered little media attention from his short speech, with an Associated Press story noting he spoke about the state's low unemployment and saying North Dakota doesn't "burden our job creators with red tape." But the lack of coverage is likely fine with Berg: Both he and his opponent have tried to tie the other to their respective national party, and a lot of attention on his time at the convention wouldn't necessary be beneficial to his campaign.

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