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Poll: McCrory, Dalton Deadlocked in N.C. Governor's Race Poll: McCrory, Dalton Deadlocked in N.C. Governor's Race

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Poll: McCrory, Dalton Deadlocked in N.C. Governor's Race

Former Charlotte Mayor Pat McCrory and Lt. Gov. Walter Dalton are virtually tied in the North Carolina governor's race, closely reflecting the state of the presidential contest in the state, according to a new NBC News/Marist poll released Thursday.

McCrory, a Republican who was defeated by Gov. Beverly Perdue four years ago, leads Democrat Dalton, 43 percent to 41 percent, well within the poll's margin of error.

McCrory's vote share closely resembles the 44 percent earned by his party's presidential nominee, Mitt Romney. But Dalton lags President Obama's 46-percent performance, earning the support of only 73 percent of Obama supporters.

Like in the presidential race, there is a gender gap in the gubernatorial ballot. McCrory leads among men by 11 points, but Dalton prevails among female voters by 6. McCrory also leads among independents, 44 percent to 35 percent, erasing the Democratic registration advantage. White voters go for McCrory by 20 points, while Dalton wins non-whites by 40.

The poll was conducted June 24-25, surveying 1,019 registered voters. The margin of error is plus-or-minus 3.1 percentage points.

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