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Hotline Sort: House Race Scramble

5) Former Alabama Rep. Artur Davis has switched from the Democratic Party to the Republican Party, and is signaling the desire for a future political run in Virginia. "If I were to run, it would be as a Republican. And I am in the process of changing my voter registration from Alabama to Virginia, a development which likely does represent a closing of one chapter and perhaps the opening of another," he said. The switch is not all that surprising considering the criticisms Davis has lobbed at President Obama and the direction of the Democratic party. Just five years ago, he was on the fast track in Democratic House leadership, an early, enthusiastic backer of Obama's campaign and believed to be on the short list for U.S. Attorney General. How times have changed. 4) Maryland's same-sex marriage law is almost certain to appear on the ballot this fall: The Baltimore Sun reports that repeal activists have collected more than twice the signatures needed for a referendum. If it goes through, this will be one of the feature ballot referendum stories this fall. 3) Politico reports that Republican super PACs and other outside groups plan to spend a whopping $1 billion on the fall elections -- another reminder that money and fundraising in politics should be looked at in a context well beyond what the presidential candidates themselves raise. 2) Wisconsin Republican Gov. Scott Walker rraised a whopping $5.9 million during the last five weeks, bringing his total haul to about $31 million. As we reported last week, overall, Republican groups have been dramatically outspending Democrats on TV -- and Walker himself has been the biggest spender of all. Meanwhile, state elections officials are forecasting turnout of about 2.6 to 2.8 million people -- which would be higher than 2010. 1) Another House incumbent ousted: Former El Paso City Rep. Beto O'Rourke defeated Rep. Silvestre Reyes 50 percent to 44 percent for the Democratic nomination in Texas's 16th Congressional District on Tuesday. Reyes, who was dogged by numerous ethics complaints, is the third House member to lose a primary to a non-incumbent challenger this cycle. Meanwhile, frotnrunning Lt. Gov. David Dewhurst failed to get a majority of the vote on Tuesday night, which means he will advance to a GOP primary runoff on July 31. With 99 percent of precincts reporting, Dewhurst led conservative underdog Ted Cruz 45 percent to 34 percent. Dewhurst and two supportive super PACs spent millions on the effort to secure an outright win on Tuesday, but Cruz was still able to hold Dewhurst well under 50 percent. Cruz's team should be pretty pleased with his showing. With 34 percent of the first-round, vote he received a greater share of the electorate than many observers expected him to get. Dewhurst's cash advantage will still present a problem for the rising conservative star the next two months, but the prospect of a very low turnout late summer runoff works to Cruz's advantage. And conservative outside groups will continue to pour in money to counter Dewhurst's deep pockets. For a recap of the rest of the evening's action, check out our roundup. Josh Kraushaar contributed

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