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Chris Matthews Gives Obama the Mad Men Treatment Chris Matthews Gives Obama the Mad Men Treatment

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Chris Matthews Gives Obama the Mad Men Treatment

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(Screenshot/Chris Matthews Show)

In advance of tonight's return of Mad Men, Chris Matthews used his long-form Sunday show to produce a tribute of President Obama in the form of Don Draper, the flawed yet brilliant lead character of a Madison Avenue ad agency in the early 1960s. The hit show returns to American Movie Classics on Sunday night after a 17-month hiatus due in part to contractual squabbles.

The montage resembles the opening of Mad Men and depicts Obama first walking into the Oval Office. He sets down his brief case. On the right frame pictures of First Lady Michelle Obama, Vice President Joe Biden and family dog Bo appear. Then Obama, like the opening to Mad Men, begins to "fall" through an array of challenges posed by Mitt Romney, Rick Santorum and Newt Gingrich. Then Obama falls deeper, passing, along the way, images of high unemployment, high gas prices, the national debt, birth control pills, Iran, GM, and auto assembly lines. Finally, Obama is seated, just as Draper is depicted to be in the opening of Mad Men, in a leather chair. Instead of Mad Men appearing alongside the image, the words "Chief Exec" appear.

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