Skip Navigation

Close and don't show again.

Your browser is out of date.

You may not get the full experience here on National Journal.

Please upgrade your browser to any of the following supported browsers:

Reveal Navigation

National Journal National Journal National Journal National Journal

This ad will end in seconds
 
Close X

Not a member? Learn More »

Forget Your Password?

Don't have an account? Register »

Reveal Navigation
 

 

 

The Most Enduring Myth About the Presidency

The Green Lantern theory just won't go away.

'Outsider' Clawson Wins Republican Primary for Radel's Seat

Self-funded candidate handily defeats two others backed by super PACs and will be heavy favorite in June special election.

Republicans Have Gotten Into the Post-McCutcheon Money Game Faster Than Democrats

Joint fundraising accounts are already being set up for the GOP to take advantage of the new landscape.

Before She Was Famous: Hillary Clinton's Political Launch

"She would have been discovered no matter what happened," says Peter Edelman, but he gave her one of her first big breaks.

WHCA to Honor National Journal's Condon

Condon is also the WHCA's "unofficial historian," working over the last two years to research the history of the organization as it celebrates its 100th anniversary this year.

Several GOP Senate Candidates Propose Eliminating Income Taxes

In crowded primary fields, Republicans are getting creative to stand out.

Syria Ships Out More Chemical Arms as Deadline Looms

Syria turned over more warfare chemicals on Tuesday, as overseers counted down to a Sunday deadline for the regime to surrender its final stocks.

Watch John McCain's Take on Russia Become His Catchphrase

We're going to call this one "McCaining."

Report: Feds Sharing Less Info on Hotspot WMDs With Congress

The U.S. government lately is sharing less information with Congress about weapons-of-mass-destruction proliferation concerns, a new Capitol Hill study finds.

Nunn Running as the Political Outsider in Georgia

She criticizes a provision of Obamacare in her latest ad.

Greenpeace Leader Moving On at 38

Phil Radford has been the youngest executive director in the environmental group's 43-year history, but he's looking for even greener pastures.

Seven in 10 Favor Mandated Contraception Coverage

Women and minorities are more likely to support the requirement, according to a new survey in the Journal of American Medical Association .

What's Changed Since Hillary Clinton's 1969 Graduation Speech—And What Hasn't

As a senior in college, Clinton was already making powerful enemies.

A Government Fight Over Cow Food Could Make Beer More Expensive

New FDA regulations, which are undergoing a review, could increase the price of beer, milk, and more, critics say.

How to Go Viral From Space

Orbital YouTubing made Chris Hadfield an Internet sensation—and got millions of people hooked on science.

How the Bush Family Went From Hated to Hipster

Between socks, biking, and bather-selfie paintings, the Bushes know how to make people forget about their legacy.

House Republicans See Opportunity in Appropriations Bills

Republicans are stepping up efforts to insert special provisions—including some that are partisan or ideological.

Show More

The Most Enduring Myth About the Presidency

The Green Lantern theory just won't go away.

'Outsider' Clawson Wins Republican Primary for Radel's Seat

Self-funded candidate handily defeats two others backed by super PACs and will be heavy favorite in June special election.

Republicans Have Gotten Into the Post-McCutcheon Money Game Faster Than Democrats

Joint fundraising accounts are already being set up for the GOP to take advantage of the new landscape.

Before She Was Famous: Hillary Clinton's Political Launch

"She would have been discovered no matter what happened," says Peter Edelman, but he gave her one of her first big breaks.

WHCA to Honor National Journal's Condon

Condon is also the WHCA's "unofficial historian," working over the last two years to research the history of the organization as it celebrates its 100th anniversary this year.

Several GOP Senate Candidates Propose Eliminating Income Taxes

In crowded primary fields, Republicans are getting creative to stand out.

Syria Ships Out More Chemical Arms as Deadline Looms

Syria turned over more warfare chemicals on Tuesday, as overseers counted down to a Sunday deadline for the regime to surrender its final stocks.

Watch John McCain's Take on Russia Become His Catchphrase

We're going to call this one "McCaining."

Report: Feds Sharing Less Info on Hotspot WMDs With Congress

The U.S. government lately is sharing less information with Congress about weapons-of-mass-destruction proliferation concerns, a new Capitol Hill study finds.

Nunn Running as the Political Outsider in Georgia

She criticizes a provision of Obamacare in her latest ad.

Greenpeace Leader Moving On at 38

Phil Radford has been the youngest executive director in the environmental group's 43-year history, but he's looking for even greener pastures.

Seven in 10 Favor Mandated Contraception Coverage

Women and minorities are more likely to support the requirement, according to a new survey in the Journal of American Medical Association .

What's Changed Since Hillary Clinton's 1969 Graduation Speech—And What Hasn't

As a senior in college, Clinton was already making powerful enemies.

A Government Fight Over Cow Food Could Make Beer More Expensive

New FDA regulations, which are undergoing a review, could increase the price of beer, milk, and more, critics say.

How to Go Viral From Space

Orbital YouTubing made Chris Hadfield an Internet sensation—and got millions of people hooked on science.

How the Bush Family Went From Hated to Hipster

Between socks, biking, and bather-selfie paintings, the Bushes know how to make people forget about their legacy.

House Republicans See Opportunity in Appropriations Bills

Republicans are stepping up efforts to insert special provisions—including some that are partisan or ideological.

Show More
 
Newsletters
Hide