Almanac A members-only database of searchable profiles compiled and adapted from the Almanac of American Politics

Biography

Elected: 2010, 4th term.

Born: June 28, 1963, Philadelphia

Home: Levittown

Education: St. Thomas U., B.A. 1985; Dickinson Schl. of Law, J.D. 1988.

Professional Career: Practicing atty., 2007-10.

Ethnicity: White/Caucasian

Religion: Catholic

Family: Married (Kathleen) , 6 children

Republican Mike Fitzpatrick was first elected in 2004, defeated in 2006, and elected again in 2010. Despite an occasional flirtation with tea party-inspired partisan rhetoric, his voting record is solidly in line with Pennsylvania’s other GOP moderates. A term-limits supporter, he announced in his 2014 victory speech that he would not run again. "There are many in Bucks County who want to serve and they should have the opportunity to do that," he said.

Fitzpatrick grew up in Bucks County’s Levittown, one of seven children. He was an Eagle Scout and graduated from St. Thomas University and Dickinson School of Law at Penn State University. From 1994 to 2004, he served on the Bucks County Commission, where he worked on land preservation and had a reputation for supporting environmental causes.

The House seat first came open when Rep. Jim Greenwood, a moderate Republican, announced in July 2004 that he would not seek reelection after accepting an offer to head the Biotechnology Industry Organization. However, Greenwood had already won the Republican primary, so local Republican leaders chose Fitzpatrick to replace him on the general election ballot. He went on to win 55%-43%.

In the House, he sponsored a successful bill requiring schools and libraries to restrict minors’ access to social networking sites and chat rooms. Fitzpatrick was the Pennsylvania delegation’s most liberal Republican in the 112th Congress (2011-12), according to National Journal rankings. In 2013, he was more liberal than all but three House GOP lawmakers.

He and now-retired Rep. Todd Platts were the only two Keystone State Republicans in 2012 to oppose a House-passed bill that replaced automatic spending cuts with targeted reductions aimed at decreasing eligibility for food stamps and eliminating programs created in the 2010 health care law. The House passed his bill that year to overturn President Barack Obama’s executive order giving an across-the-board pay hike to members of Congress and some federal workers. He also got a measure into law to extend death benefits to the families of emergency service workers for non-profit organizations.

But some of his statements have ignited criticism. He suggested at an April 2012 fundraiser that Obama would have the power to “trade away … the secrets of our national intelligence” if reelected. Democrats also condemned a remark he made that September to a tea party group. He said, “We need to support people who have a history and know what it is like to sign the front of a paycheck, not the back of a paycheck.”

In his first bid for reelection in 2006, Fitzpatrick was challenged by Democrat Patrick Murphy, the son of a Philadelphia policeman and an Army lawyer and Iraq war veteran. Murphy favored an end to the war at a time antiwar sentiments were running high. Fitzpatrick tried to distance himself from the Bush administration’s policies in Iraq. When Fitzpatrick ran an ad questioning Murphy’s claim that he had worked as a Justice Department prosecutor, Murphy declared at a forum, “Mike, you are a liar and a coward.” Murphy won 50.3%-49.7%, with a vote margin of 1,518 votes out of almost 250,000 votes cast.

Fitzpatrick returned to private law practice. He was later diagnosed with colon cancer; after treatment, doctors gave him a clean bill of health in 2010. That year was shaping up to be a favorable political climate for Republicans, and Fitzpatrick decided to try to get the seat back. In the GOP primary, he faced three opponents and was viewed as the establishment candidate, endorsed by The Philadelphia Inquirer. He was embarrassed, however, by a comment he made about primary opponent Gloria Carlineo, whom he called an “immigrant,” even though she hails from Puerto Rico. Fitzpatrick later said he meant the comment as a compliment in the sense that she is living the American dream. Still, Fitzpatrick won the primary with 77% of the vote.

In the general election, Fitzpatrick emphasized not the environmental issues he had in the past, but his opposition to the Obama administration. “Cash for clunkers, Obamacare, stimulus—no jobs. We’ve wasted a lot of money in the last few years,” he told The New York Times. Like many Democrats in 2010, Murphy emphasized his support for allowing the Bush-era tax cuts to expire for high-income earners while extending them for other taxpayers. Murphy also attacked Fitzpatrick for “Fitzflops”—formerly cosponsoring and now opposing a bill making it easier to organize labor unions, and formerly bragging about being one of the House’s most liberal Republicans but now campaigning as a tea partier.

Murphy was a favorite of many Democratic insiders who hoped that, at age 37, he might someday be a statewide candidate. He had also raised his profile as the leader in the House effort to repeal the ban on openly gay service personnel in the military. Murphy spent $4.3 million, more than twice the $2 million Fitzpatrick spent. Nonetheless, Fitzpatrick won by a decisive 54%-46%.

In 2012, his Democratic opponent was attorney Kathy Boockvar. The National Republican Congressional Committee landed in hot water by launching an online ad and robo-call tying Boockvar to the controversial movement to free convicted cop-killer Mumia Abu-Jamal. Her husband had once done legal work for a witness who recanted her testimony in the case. That led former Democratic Gov. Ed Rendell, still a popular figure in the area, to condemn Fitzpatrick. But the incumbent outraised her by nearly 2-to-1 and won, 57%-43%.

Office Contact Information

MAIN OFFICE

(202) 225-4276

(202) 225-9511

RHOB- Rayburn House Office Building Room 2400
Washington, DC 20515-3808

MAIN OFFICE

(202) 225-4276

(202) 225-9511

RHOB- Rayburn House Office Building Room 2400
Washington, DC 20515-3808

DISTRICT OFFICE

(215) 579-8102

(215) 579-8109

1717 Langhorne Newtown Road Suite 400
Langhorne, PA 19047-1086

DISTRICT OFFICE

(215) 579-8102

(215) 579-8109

1717 Langhorne Newtown Suite 400
Langhorne, PA 19047-1086

Staff

Sort by: Interest Name Title

Abortion

Anna DiMascia
Legislative Correspondent

Agriculture

Justin Rusk
Deputy Chief of Staff for Legislative Operations

Animal Rights

Anna DiMascia
Legislative Correspondent

Appropriations

Justin Rusk
Deputy Chief of Staff for Legislative Operations

Banking

Joe Hogan
Scheduler; Legislative Assistant

joe.hogan@mail.house.gov
(202) 225-4276

Campaign

Joe Hogan
Scheduler; Legislative Assistant

joe.hogan@mail.house.gov
(202) 225-4276

Finance

Joe Hogan
Scheduler; Legislative Assistant

joe.hogan@mail.house.gov
(202) 225-4276

Foreign

Chris Matarangas
Legislative Aide

Govt Ops

Justin Rusk
Deputy Chief of Staff for Legislative Operations

Joe Hogan
Scheduler; Legislative Assistant

joe.hogan@mail.house.gov
(202) 225-4276

Health

Anna DiMascia
Legislative Correspondent

Homeland Security

Chris Matarangas
Legislative Aide

Housing

Joe Hogan
Scheduler; Legislative Assistant

joe.hogan@mail.house.gov
(202) 225-4276

Immigration

Justin Rusk
Deputy Chief of Staff for Legislative Operations

Intelligence

Chris Matarangas
Legislative Aide

Judiciary

Justin Rusk
Deputy Chief of Staff for Legislative Operations

Labor

Joe Hogan
Scheduler; Legislative Assistant

joe.hogan@mail.house.gov
(202) 225-4276

Military

Justin Rusk
Deputy Chief of Staff for Legislative Operations

Anthony Nisivoccia
Veterans and Military Advocate

Religion

Chris Matarangas
Legislative Aide

Social Security

Justin Rusk
Deputy Chief of Staff for Legislative Operations

Tax

Justin Rusk
Deputy Chief of Staff for Legislative Operations

Technology

Chris Matarangas
Legislative Aide

Telecommunications

Joe Hogan
Scheduler; Legislative Assistant

joe.hogan@mail.house.gov
(202) 225-4276

Trade

Joe Hogan
Scheduler; Legislative Assistant

joe.hogan@mail.house.gov
(202) 225-4276

Transportation

Justin Rusk
Deputy Chief of Staff for Legislative Operations

Veterans

Chris Matarangas
Legislative Aide

Anthony Nisivoccia
Veterans and Military Advocate

Welfare

Anna DiMascia
Legislative Correspondent

Women

Anna DiMascia
Legislative Correspondent

Election Results

2012 GENERAL
Mike Fitzpatrick
Votes: 199,379
Percent: 56.6%
Kathy Boockvar
Votes: 152,859
Percent: 43.4%
2012 PRIMARY
Mike Fitzpatrick
Unopposed
2010 GENERAL
Mike Fitzpatrick
Votes: 130,759
Percent: 53.52%
Patrick Murphy
Votes: 113,547
Percent: 46.48%
2010 PRIMARY
Mike Fitzpatrick
Votes: 33,671
Percent: 76.75%
Gloria Carlineo
Votes: 6,529
Percent: 14.88%
Ira Hoffman
Votes: 2,424
Percent: 5.53%
Prior Winning Percentages
2010 (54%), 2004 (55%)

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