Almanac A members-only database of searchable profiles compiled and adapted from the Almanac of American Politics

Biography

Elected: 1994, 10th term.

Born: August 5, 1953, Pittsburgh

Home: Forest Hills

Education: PA St. U., B.S. 1975

Professional Career: Insurance agent, 1975–77; Exec. dir., Turtle Creek Valley Citizens Union, 1977–79; Chief of Staff, PA Sen. Frank Pecora, 1978–94; Co–Founder/owner, Eastgate Insurance Agency, 1983–present.

Ethnicity: White/Caucasian

Religion: Catholic

Family: married (Susan) , 4 children

Mike Doyle, an ardently pro-labor Democrat first elected in 1994, has been the most liberal member of Pennsylvania’s House delegation in recent years, although he tends to take a conservative line on abortion.

Of Irish and Italian descent, Doyle grew up in the Mon Valley town of Swissvale and worked in steel mills during summers off from Penn State. He became an insurance agent and was elected to the Swissvale Borough Council in 1977, at age 24. In 1978, he became chief of staff to state Sen. Frank Pecora, a Republican. Pecora switched parties in 1992 and briefly gave Democrats control of the state Senate. In 1994, Doyle, who had just switched himself to the Democratic Party, ran for the House seat vacated by Republican Rep. Rick Santorum, who ran successfully for the Senate. Doyle was one of seven Democrats and four Republican candidates. With endorsements from labor unions and community leaders, he won the primary. In the general election, he faced John McCarty, an aide to the late Republican Sen. John Heinz. McCarty was pro-abortion rights and Doyle opposed abortion rights. Doyle also campaigned for sweeping health care changes. In a Republican year, he won 55%-45%.

In the House, Doyle initially had a mixed voting record, often on the right on cultural issues and on the left on economics. During the years in which his party controlled the House and emphasized economics, he became much more of a progressive populist. The pattern has continued with his party in the minority. He has complained that House Budget Committee Chairman Paul Ryan’s budget blueprint would “eviscerate” social services. As an anti-abortion Catholic, he helped broker the deal on abortion during the final days of the 2010 health care debate that brought other anti-abortion members of his party on board. Two years earlier, he was among the religious-minded lawmakers living together near the Capitol on C Street who confronted their housemate, Nevada GOP Sen. John Ensign, over his affair with the wife of an aide—a revelation that ultimately led Ensign to resign his seat in 2011.

Doyle rarely seeks attention or causes much of a ruckus. One notable exception was the 2011 debate over raising the federal debt limit, when in a private meeting he reportedly compared Republicans’ negotiating tactics to those of terrorists. Conservative bloggers and commentators heaped criticism on him, and he said, “I wasn’t out to defame anybody.”

On the Energy and Commerce Committee, his focus has been on high-tech initiatives, including increased availability of broadband services in underserved areas. He has been a leading advocate of the “Do Not Call” restrictions on telephone marketers, and won passage in 2008 of a bill to make the national list permanent. Doyle also has worked to reduce foreign imports, and he pushed a bill to create a national historic site at the former U.S. Steel facilities along the Mon River.

During the debate over cap-and-trade legislation, which would cap harmful carbon emissions but allow companies to trade on the right to pollute, he vigorously advocated the interests of steel and other Rust Belt industries, even as he sought to work out a compromise with environmentalists. When Republicans in 2011 voted to slash the Environmental Protection Agency’s power to regulate emissions, Doyle accused the GOP of “scaring American people” into wrongly believing that failure to curb EPA’s authority would cause gas prices to rise. During debate in 2012 over the controversial Keystone XL pipeline, he unsuccessfully offered an amendment that would have required at least three-quarters of the iron and steel in the pipeline to be made in North America.

Before the practice was banned, Doyle was an avid earmarker of spending projects for his district. In 2010, he secured more than $23 million in earmarks, a figure just slightly behind that of fellow Pennsylvania Democrat Chaka Fattah, who sits on the Appropriations Committee. One of Doyle’s favorite beneficiaries is the Doyle Center for Manufacturing Technology in South Oakland, which was started in 2003 by a $1.5 million federal grant he helped secure. He also is active on funding autism research and cracking down on illegal dog-breeding called “puppy mills.”

Doyle has been politically untouchable and he represents the only safe district in western Pennsylvania for a Democrat. His colleagues appreciate Doyle for his efforts managing the Democrats’ team in the annual congressional charity baseball game.

Office Contact Information

MAIN OFFICE

(202) 225-2135

(202) 225-3084

CHOB- Cannon House Office Building Room 239
Washington, DC 20515-3814

MAIN OFFICE

(202) 225-2135

(202) 225-3084

CHOB- Cannon House Office Building Room 239
Washington, DC 20515-3814

DISTRICT OFFICE

(412) 390-1499

(412) 390-2118

2637 East Carson Street
Pittsburgh, PA 15203-5109

DISTRICT OFFICE

(412) 390-1499

(412) 390-2118

2637 East Carson Street
Pittsburgh, PA 15203-5109

DISTRICT OFFICE

(412) 241-6055

(412) 241-6820

11 Duff Road
Penn Hills, PA 15235-3263

DISTRICT OFFICE

(412) 241-6055

(412) 241-6820

11 Duff Road
Penn Hills, PA 15235-3263

DISTRICT OFFICE

(412) 664-4049

(412) 664-4053

627 Lysle Boulevard
McKeesport, PA 15132-2524

DISTRICT OFFICE

(412) 664-4049

(412) 664-4053

627 Lysle Boulevard
McKeesport, PA 15132-2524

DISTRICT OFFICE

(412) 264-3460

1350 Fifth Avenue
Coraopolis, PA 15108-2024

DISTRICT OFFICE

(412) 264-3460

1350 Fifth Avenue
Coraopolis, PA 15108-2024

CAMPAIGN OFFICE

(412) 244-9101

205 Hawthorne Court
Pittsburgh, PA 15221

CAMPAIGN OFFICE

205 Hawthorne Court
Pittsburgh, PA 15221

Staff

Sort by: Interest Name Title

Abortion

Hannah Malvin
Legislative Assistant

Agriculture

Hannah Malvin
Legislative Assistant

Animal Rights

Chris Bowman
Legislative Assistant

Appropriations

Chris Bowman
Legislative Assistant

Arts

Hannah Malvin
Legislative Assistant

Budget

Chris Bowman
Legislative Assistant

Commerce

Jeffrey Schaffer
Economic Development Representative

Education

Philip Murphy
Legislative Director

Hannah Malvin
Legislative Assistant

Energy

Chris Bowman
Legislative Assistant

Finance

Hannah Malvin
Legislative Assistant

Govt Ops

Hannah Malvin
Legislative Assistant

Chris Bowman
Legislative Assistant

Gun Issues

Hannah Malvin
Legislative Assistant

Homeland Security

Hannah Malvin
Legislative Assistant

Housing

Hannah Malvin
Legislative Assistant

Immigration

Hannah Malvin
Legislative Assistant

Intelligence

Philip Murphy
Legislative Director

Judiciary

Hannah Malvin
Legislative Assistant

Labor

Chris Bowman
Legislative Assistant

Medicare

Hannah Malvin
Legislative Assistant

Privacy

Philip Murphy
Legislative Director

Rules

Philip Murphy
Legislative Director

Science

Philip Murphy
Legislative Director

Small Business

Chris Bowman
Legislative Assistant

Social Security

Chris Bowman
Legislative Assistant

Tax

Philip Murphy
Legislative Director

Technology

Philip Murphy
Legislative Director

Telecommunications

Philip Murphy
Legislative Director

Transportation

Chris Bowman
Legislative Assistant

Election Results

2012 GENERAL
Mike Doyle
Votes: 251,932
Percent: 76.89%
Hans Lessmann
Votes: 75,702
Percent: 23.11%
2012 PRIMARY
Mike Doyle
Votes: 50,323
Percent: 80.12%
Janis Brooks
Votes: 12,484
Percent: 19.88%
2010 GENERAL
Mike Doyle
Votes: 122,073
Percent: 68.79%
Melissa Haluszczak
Votes: 49,997
Percent: 28.17%
2010 PRIMARY
Mike Doyle
Votes: 71,511
Percent: 100.0%
2008 GENERAL
Mike Doyle
Votes: 242,326
Percent: 91.26%
Titus North
Votes: 23,214
Percent: 8.74%
2008 PRIMARY
Mike Doyle
Votes: 134,298
Percent: 100.0%
Prior Winning Percentages
2010 (69%), 2008 (91%), 2006 (90%), 2004 (100%), 2002 (100%), 2000 (69%), 1998 (68%), 1996 (56%), 1994 (55%)

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