Almanac A members-only database of searchable profiles compiled and adapted from the Almanac of American Politics

Biography

Elected: 2010, 10th term.

Born: January 22, 1953, Cincinnati

Home: Cincinnati

Education: Col. of William & Mary, B.A. 1975; Northern KY U., J.D. 1978.

Professional Career: Teacher, St. Joseph Schl., 1975-76; Practicing atty., 1978-94.

Ethnicity: White/Caucasian

Religion: Catholic

Family: Married (Donna) , 2 children

Republican Steve Chabot first came to the House as part of the historic GOP Class of 1994 and served 14 years before losing his seat to Democrat Steve Driehaus. He got it back by beating Driehaus in 2010, and he reclaimed his status as one of the chamber’s most conservative members. He became Small Business Committee chairman in 2015.

Chabot (SHAB-bit) grew up in the Cincinnati area and graduated from La Salle High School, where he says he “got the bug” for politics after serving on the student council. Then came the Watergate scandal. “A lot of people my age got turned off from politics because of all that,” Chabot said in an interview with National Journal. “I wasn’t that way. I thought we needed honest people in government.” He went on to earn a degree in history and physical education from the College of William & Mary. He then took night classes at Northern Kentucky University while teaching at an elementary school during the day. Chabot won a seat on the Cincinnati City Council, where he served for four years. He followed that with a four-year stint on the Hamilton County Commission. During that time, Chabot said, he tried to find innovative ways to reduce the cost of government, such as using jail inmates for some public services.

In 1994, he was among the conservative Republicans who successfully ran for Congress and ended 40 years of Democratic control of the House. In his 14 years on Capitol Hill, Chabot took principled and politically risky stands opposing federal spending on projects in his district and was a leader on social issues, particularly opposition to abortion rights. In 2003, he helped enact a ban on “partial-birth” abortions, and he also pushed a bill to prevent minors from crossing state lines to get abortions. Chabot was a House manager during the 1998 impeachment of President Bill Clinton. In retrospect, Chabot said, he is most proud of his work in fighting wasteful spending.

Chabot lost his seat in 2008, when Driehaus defeated him by 5 percentage points. He had been spoiling for a rematch since. In the 2010 campaign, Chabot criticized the incumbent for voting with the Democratic majority on President Barack Obama’s health care initiative and the $787 billion economic-stimulus package. For his part, Driehaus defended the work that Democrats have done during the first two years of the Obama administration, including the health care overhaul, which he called “the right thing” to do. On the stump, he asked voters to give Obama and the Democrats more time to implement change. But Driehaus had trouble generating much voter excitement for his reelection, and in October, the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee pulled the plug on further spending on television ads for him. Both candidates raised about $2 million each. Chabot won, 52% to 46%.

With Republican Sam Graves of Missouri term-limited as Small Business' chairman, Chabot played up his conservative bona fides to succeed Graves. "If there's one thing government can do for small business, it's to get the heck off their backs," Chabot told the Associated Press. In addition to scrutinizing the Internal Revenue Service and Environmental Protection Agency, he said he would try to streamline the Small Business Agency's lending process. "It's cumbersome, it takes too long, there's far too much paperwork. It just intimidates a lot of people," he said

When he initially returned to the House, Chabot was able to use his seniority to claim the chairmanship of a Foreign Affairs subcommittee focusing on the Middle East and South Asia. He became a critic of the Obama administration’s policies in the region and called its explanation of events before and after the deadly September 2012 attack at the U.S. embassy in Benghazi, Libya “ham-handed at best and a cover-up at worst.” He introduced a bill in 2012 to revamp the Section 8 housing initiative for low-income residents, calling it “a broken program that rewards dependency on government with our tax dollars.” He also crusaded against federal funding of Cincinnati’s streetcar project on economic grounds.

But he drew the most attention in August 2011, when his staff ordered police to seize the cameras of two Democratic activists who were videotaping one of Chabot’s town hall meetings. After an outpouring of criticism from across the political spectrum—tea party leader Judson Phillips called Chabot a “moron”— he allowed taping of subsequent events.

Ohio Republicans, in post-2010 census redistricting, made the 1st District substantially more Republican, and Chabot won reelection in 2012 by beating Democrat Jeff Sinnard, 58%-37%, with two minor-party candidates splitting the remainder. “Unless Steve Chabot commits a felony, he will be there for as long as he wants to be,” Hamilton County Democratic Party Chairman Tim Burke lamented to The Cincinnati Enquirer.

Office Contact Information

MAIN OFFICE

(202) 225-2216

(202) 225-3012

RHOB- Rayburn House Office Building Room 2371
Washington, DC 20515-3501

MAIN OFFICE

(202) 225-2216

(202) 225-3012

RHOB- Rayburn House Office Building Room 2371
Washington, DC 20515-3501

DISTRICT OFFICE

(513) 684-2723

(513) 421-8722

441 Vine Street Suite 3003
Cincinnati, OH 45202-3003

DISTRICT OFFICE

(513) 684-2723

(513) 421-8722

441 Vine Street Suite 3003
Cincinnati, OH 45202-3003

DISTRICT OFFICE

(513) 421-8704

(513) 421-8722

11 South Broad Way
Lebanon, OH 45036-1769

DISTRICT OFFICE

(513) 421-8704

(513) 421-8722

11 South Broad Way
Lebanon, OH 45036-1769

CAMPAIGN OFFICE

(513) 662-8000

3030 Harrison Avenue
Cincinnati, OH 45211

CAMPAIGN OFFICE

3030 Harrison Avenue
Cincinnati, OH 45211

Staff

Sort by: Interest Name Title

Agriculture

Jonathan Lowe
Legislative Correspondent

Appropriations

Chris Hess
Legislative Assistant

chris.hess@mail.house.gov
(202) 225-2216

Education

Jonathan Lowe
Legislative Correspondent

Energy

Chris Hess
Legislative Assistant

chris.hess@mail.house.gov
(202) 225-2216

Environment

Jonathan Lowe
Legislative Correspondent

Foreign

Katelyn Moore
Administrative Director

Health

Aaron Bill
Legislative Counsel

aaron.bill@mail.house.gov
(202) 225-2216

Homeland Security

Alyssa Heim
Deputy District Director

Housing

Chris Hess
Legislative Assistant

chris.hess@mail.house.gov
(202) 225-2216

Immigration

Joe Abner
Office Manager

joe.abner@mail.house.gov
(513) 684-2723

Chris Hess
Legislative Assistant

chris.hess@mail.house.gov
(202) 225-2216

Labor

Joe Abner
Office Manager

joe.abner@mail.house.gov
(513) 684-2723

Medicare

David McCandless
District Representative

Military

David McCandless
District Representative

Alyssa Heim
Deputy District Director

Social Security

David McCandless
District Representative

Tax

Joe Abner
Office Manager

joe.abner@mail.house.gov
(513) 684-2723

Aaron Bill
Legislative Counsel

aaron.bill@mail.house.gov
(202) 225-2216

Technology

Aaron Bill
Legislative Counsel

aaron.bill@mail.house.gov
(202) 225-2216

Transportation

Chris Hess
Legislative Assistant

chris.hess@mail.house.gov
(202) 225-2216

Veterans

David McCandless
District Representative

Aaron Bill
Legislative Counsel

aaron.bill@mail.house.gov
(202) 225-2216

Election Results

2012 GENERAL
Steve Chabot
Votes: 201,907
Percent: 57.73%
Jeff Sinnard
Votes: 131,490
Percent: 37.6%
2012 PRIMARY
Steve Chabot
Unopposed
2010 GENERAL
Steve Chabot
Votes: 103,770
Percent: 51.49%
Steve Driehaus
Votes: 92,672
Percent: 45.99%
2010 PRIMARY
Steve Chabot
Votes: 33,544
Percent: 100.0%
Prior Winning Percentages
2010 (51%), 2006 (52%), 2004 (60%), 2002 (65%), 2000 (53%), 1998 (53%), 1996 (54%), 1994 (56%)

To order a print copy of the 2016 edition of the Almanac of American Politics, click here. For questions about print orders, call Columbia Books at 1-888-265-0600 ext 0266 or email customer service.

For questions about the digital Almanac, please contact your Dedicated Advisor or Membership@NationalJournal.com.

×