Almanac A members-only database of searchable profiles compiled and adapted from the Almanac of American Politics

Biography

Elected: 2006, 4th term.

Born: February 17, 1964, Troy

Home: Urbana

Education: U. of WI, B.A. 1986, OH St. U., M.Ed. 1991, Capital U., J.D. 2002

Professional Career: Asst. wrestling coach, OH St. U., 1987-95; Wrestling camp coach, clinician, 1987-2006.

Ethnicity: White/Caucasian

Religion: Christian

Family: married (Polly) , 4 children

Republican Jim Jordan, first elected in 2006, endeared himself to conservatives while annoying his party’s leaders in the 112th Congress (2011-12) as the confrontational chairman of the Republican Study Committee, the caucus of the House’s most right-leaning members. He no longer chairs the group but has remained an outspoken voice on the right on fiscal and social policy.

Jordan grew up in Champaign County and graduated from Graham High School, where he was a championship wrestler. At the University of Wisconsin, Jordan won two NCAA wrestling championships in the 134-pound weight class and was inducted into the Badger Hall of Fame. After graduating in 1986 with an economics degree, Jordan worked as an assistant wrestling coach at Ohio State University, where he earned a master’s degree in education before completing a law degree at Capital University. Within a few years, he began thinking about elected office. “You get married and have kids, and you get sick of having the government take your money and tell you what to do,” he told columnist George Will in 2011. He won a state House seat in 1994, won reelection twice, and then won a tough primary in 2000 for the state Senate. During his time in the legislature, Jordan compiled a solidly conservative voting record, sponsoring legislation creating Ohio’s “Choose Life” license plates, backing a ban on same-sex marriage, and supporting government vouchers for private school tuition.

Jordan announced his bid for Congress when Republican Rep. Michael Oxley retired after 12 terms. Jordan entered the six-way Republican primary with the most name recognition and had support from the Ohio Right to Life, the National Rifle Association, and the national anti-tax group Club for Growth. Findlay real estate developer Frank Guglielmi spent $1.6 million of his own money and saturated the television airwaves with ads. Jordan raised plenty of money but failed to break the $1 million mark before the primary. While money mattered, so did geography. Jordan won with 51%, carrying eight of 11 counties. Guglielmi carried only his home county and one other to finish second with 30%. Despite the tough political environment for Republicans in 2006, Democrats never mounted a competitive campaign for the seat. Jordan beat Lima attorney and Vietnam veteran Rick Siferd 60%-40%.

In the House, Jordan established an unfailingly conservative voting record, with a 100% lifetime rating from the American Conservative Union through 2012. “With the exception of the military, the federal government doesn’t do anything very well,” he once told the Mansfield News Journal. He said he weighs all issues based on whether they benefit families; he is a father of four whose desk calendar is crowded with his children’s athletic schedules, and he caddies for his daughter at her golf tournaments. He refused to attend the 2011 Conservative Political Action Conference because the gay conservative group GOProud was invited.

With his right-wing bona fides well established, Jordan succeeded Georgia’s Tom Price as head of the 170-member Republican Study Committee when Price won a GOP leadership post in late 2010. “He approaches the world of politics like a wrestling match, with the same kind of intensity, preparation, training, and focus,” Price told The Plain Dealer of Cleveland. Jordan had been chairman of the group’s budget task force. He beat back a challenge from Texas’ Louie Gohmert, who accused him of being a “wing man” for John Boehner, the GOP leader from a neighboring Ohio district. But Jordan vowed to be independent of the leadership, saying his group would lobby lawmakers just as vigorously as the Republicans’ formal whip team.

Under Jordan’s guidance, the RSC in early 2011 unveiled a budget plan that called for cutting spending by a whopping $2.5 trillion over 10 years. It would hold non-security discretionary spending to fiscal 2008 levels in the first year and at 2006 levels in subsequent years. When the House approved a temporary measure in March to keep the government running until April 8 as Republicans and President Barack Obama tried to hammer out an agreement on spending cuts, Jordan was openly scornful. “We must do more than cut spending in bite-sized pieces,” he said. He denied speculation that his caucus was eager to shut down the government, a move that had disastrous political consequences for Republicans in 1995, and he said he was not out to undercut Boehner. But anonymous Republicans and lobbyists told The Columbus Dispatch that they were worried about the growing divide between Jordan and Boehner. Rep. Steven LaTourette, R-Ohio, a Boehner ally, told the Associated Press in July 2011 in reference to the Study Committee, “My experience with things that don’t bend is that they break.”

Jordan also dug in his heels during the showdown in 2011 over whether to raise the federal debt limit. But he apologized to Republicans at a closed-door meeting after one of his staffers sent an email to conservative groups identifying which lawmakers were undecided about voting for the increase. The Dispatch reported that Boehner’s allies in Ohio were considering retaliation through a redistricting plan that would make Jordan’s seat substantially more competitive. Boehner denied any such effort, and the new district added some Democratic areas but kept it well-stocked with GOP voters. Jordan pointedly was not among the conservatives who voted for other people rather than for Boehner when Boehner sought a new term as House speaker at the start of the 113th Congress (2013-14).

Jordan had little reservation about steep automatic spending reductions that went into effect in early 2013 after Republicans and Obama once again failed to reach a budget deal. The cuts under a so-called sequester “won’t be the end of the world” and marked an important step towards savings, he said in February 2013.

Office Contact Information

MAIN OFFICE

(202) 225-2676

(202) 226-0577

LHOB- Longworth House Office Building Room 1524
Washington, DC 20515-3504

MAIN OFFICE

(202) 225-2676

(202) 226-0577

LHOB- Longworth House Office Building Room 1524
Washington, DC 20515-3504

DISTRICT OFFICE

(419) 999-6455

(419) 999-4238

3121 West Elm Plaza
Lima, OH 45805-2516

DISTRICT OFFICE

(419) 999-6455

(419) 999-4238

3121 West Elm Plaza
Lima, OH 45805-2516

DISTRICT OFFICE

(419) 663-1426

(419) 668-3015

13 B East Main Street
Norwalk, OH 44857

DISTRICT OFFICE

(419) 663-1426

(419) 668-3015

13 B East Main Street
Norwalk, OH 44857

DISTRICT OFFICE

(419) 663-1426

Bucyrus City Building
Bucyrus, OH 44820

DISTRICT OFFICE

(419) 663-1426

Bucyrus City Building
Bucyrus, OH 44820

CAMPAIGN OFFICE

1709 South State Route 560
Urbana, OH 43078

CAMPAIGN OFFICE

1709 South OH Route 560
Urbana, OH 43078

Staff

Sort by: Interest Name Title

Abortion

Tiffany Angulo
Legislative Assistant

Aerospace

Kevin Eichinger
Legislative Assistant

Agriculture

Tiffany Angulo
Legislative Assistant

Animal Rights

Tiffany Angulo
Legislative Assistant

Appropriations

Jared Dilley
Legislative Director

Arts

Tiffany Angulo
Legislative Assistant

Banking

Kevin Eichinger
Legislative Assistant

Budget

Jared Dilley
Legislative Director

Campaign

Kevin Eichinger
Legislative Assistant

Congress

Kevin Eichinger
Legislative Assistant

Crime

Tiffany Angulo
Legislative Assistant

Education

Tiffany Angulo
Legislative Assistant

Energy

Jared Dilley
Legislative Director

Environment

Jared Dilley
Legislative Director

Kevin Eichinger
Legislative Assistant

Family

Tiffany Angulo
Legislative Assistant

Finance

Kevin Eichinger
Legislative Assistant

Foreign

Jared Dilley
Legislative Director

Govt Ops

Kevin Eichinger
Legislative Assistant

Gun Issues

Kevin Eichinger
Legislative Assistant

Health

Tiffany Angulo
Legislative Assistant

Homeland Security

Jared Dilley
Legislative Director

Housing

Kevin Eichinger
Legislative Assistant

Human Rights

Tiffany Angulo
Legislative Assistant

Immigration

Jared Dilley
Legislative Director

Insurance

Kevin Eichinger
Legislative Assistant

Intelligence

Jared Dilley
Legislative Director

Judiciary

Tiffany Angulo
Legislative Assistant

Labor

Tiffany Angulo
Legislative Assistant

Land Use

Jared Dilley
Legislative Director

Medicare

Tiffany Angulo
Legislative Assistant

Military

Jared Dilley
Legislative Director

Rules

Kevin Eichinger
Legislative Assistant

Science

Kevin Eichinger
Legislative Assistant

Small Business

Kevin Eichinger
Legislative Assistant

Social Security

Tiffany Angulo
Legislative Assistant

Tax

Jared Dilley
Legislative Director

Technology

Tiffany Angulo
Legislative Assistant

Telecommunications

Tiffany Angulo
Legislative Assistant

Trade

Jared Dilley
Legislative Director

Transportation

Jared Dilley
Legislative Director

Veterans

Jared Dilley
Legislative Director

Welfare

Tiffany Angulo
Legislative Assistant

Election Results

2012 GENERAL
Jim Jordan
Votes: 182,643
Percent: 58.35%
Jim Slone
Votes: 114,214
Percent: 36.49%
Chris Kalla
Votes: 16,141
Percent: 5.16%
2012 PRIMARY
Jim Jordan
Unopposed
2010 GENERAL
Jim Jordan
Votes: 146,029
Percent: 71.49%
Doug Litt
Votes: 50,533
Percent: 24.74%
2010 PRIMARY
Jim Jordan
Votes: 56,093
Percent: 100.0%
2008 GENERAL
Jim Jordan
Votes: 186,154
Percent: 65.17%
Mike Carroll
Votes: 99,499
Percent: 34.83%
2008 PRIMARY
Jim Jordan
Votes: 66,771
Percent: 100.0%
Prior Winning Percentages
2010 (71%), 2008 (65%), 2006 (60%)

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