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Democrat

Sen. Robert Casey Jr. (D)

Robert Casey Jr. Contact
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Email: n/a
DC Contact Information

Phone: 202-224-6324

Address: 393 RSOB, DC 20510

State Office Contact Information

Phone: (717) 231-7540

Address: 22 South Third Street, Harrisburg PA 17101

Philadelphia PA

Phone: (215) 405-9660

Fax: (215) 405-9669

Address: 2000 Market Street, Philadelphia PA 19103

Pittsburgh PA

Phone: (412) 803-7370

Fax: (412) 803-7379

Address: 310 Grant Street, Pittsburgh PA 15219

Scranton PA

Phone: (570) 941-0930

Fax: (570) 941-0937

Address: 417 Lackawanna Avenue, Scranton PA 18503

Erie PA

Phone: (814) 874-5080

Fax: (814) 874-5084

Address: 17 South Park Row, Erie PA 16501

Allentown PA

Phone: (610) 782-9470

Fax: (610) 782-9474

Address: 840 Hamilton Street, Allentown PA 18101

Bellefonte PA

Phone: (814) 357-0314

Fax: (814) 357-0318

Address: 817 East Bishop Street, Bellefonte PA 16823

Robert Casey Jr. Staff
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Mueller, Gillian
Senior Policy Advisor
Hartman, Doug
Legislative Correspondent
Groarke, Jack
Legislative Assistant
Mueller, Gillian
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Borzner, Claire
Legislative Correspondent
Hermsen, Liz
Senior Policy Advisor
Groarke, Jack
Legislative Assistant
Rojas, Pablo
Legislative Correspondent
Groarke, Jack
Legislative Assistant
Groarke, Jack
Legislative Assistant
Hartman, Doug
Legislative Correspondent
Mabry, Sara
Legislative Assistant
Groarke, Jack
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Gearen, Caitlin
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Hartman, Doug
Legislative Correspondent
Mueller, Gillian
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Groarke, Jack
Legislative Assistant
Webster, Kichelle
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Groarke, Jack
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Hill, Joseph
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Solomon, Jared
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Borzner, Claire
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Hermsen, Liz
Senior Policy Advisor
Borzner, Claire
Legislative Correspondent
Hermsen, Liz
Senior Policy Advisor
Obando-Derstine, Carol
Latino Affairs Advisor; Regional Manager
Rojas, Pablo
Legislative Correspondent
Hartman, Doug
Legislative Correspondent
Mabry, Sara
Legislative Assistant
Borzner, Claire
Legislative Correspondent
Hermsen, Liz
Senior Policy Advisor
Gearen, Caitlin
Legislative Assistant
Hartman, Doug
Legislative Correspondent
Mabry, Sara
Legislative Assistant
Mueller, Gillian
Senior Policy Advisor
Gearen, Caitlin
Legislative Assistant
Rojas, Pablo
Legislative Correspondent
Solomon, Jared
Legislative Assistant
Rojas, Pablo
Legislative Correspondent
Groarke, Jack
Legislative Assistant
Gearen, Caitlin
Legislative Assistant
Gearen, Caitlin
Legislative Assistant
Groarke, Jack
Legislative Assistant
Hartman, Doug
Legislative Correspondent
Mueller, Gillian
Senior Policy Advisor
Mueller, Gillian
Senior Policy Advisor
Hartman, Doug
Legislative Correspondent
Mabry, Sara
Legislative Assistant
Mueller, Gillian
Senior Policy Advisor
Obando-Derstine, Carol
Latino Affairs Advisor; Regional Manager
Borzner, Claire
Legislative Correspondent
Hermsen, Liz
Senior Policy Advisor
Groarke, Jack
Legislative Assistant
Groarke, Jack
Legislative Assistant
Rojas, Pablo
Legislative Correspondent
Hill, Joseph
Legislative Fellow
Solomon, Jared
Legislative Assistant
Mueller, Gillian
Senior Policy Advisor
Groarke, Jack
Legislative Assistant
Mueller, Gillian
Senior Policy Advisor
Rojas, Pablo
Legislative Correspondent
Rojas, Pablo
Legislative Correspondent
Gearen, Caitlin
Legislative Assistant
Rojas, Pablo
Legislative Correspondent
Groarke, Jack
Legislative Assistant
Webster, Kichelle
Legislative Correspondent
Borzner, Claire
Legislative Correspondent
Hermsen, Liz
Senior Policy Advisor
Mueller, Gillian
Senior Policy Advisor
Groarke, Jack
Legislative Assistant
Mueller, Gillian
Senior Policy Advisor
Hartman, Doug
Legislative Correspondent
Mabry, Sara
Legislative Assistant
Ball, Jordan
Regional Representative
Beecher, Dianne
Senior Constituent Advocate
Bierly, Kim
Regional Manager
Borzner, Claire
Legislative Correspondent
Brown, James
Chief of Staff
Bullock, Cheryl
Southeast Regional Director
Dennis, Teresa
Deputy Director of Constituent Services
Erickson, Jackie
Southwest Regional Director
Ferruchie, Jim
Regional Representative
Gall, Alexa
Constituent Advocate
Garcia, Sandra
Constituent Advocate
Gearen, Caitlin
Legislative Assistant
Gentile, Kristen
Deputy Chief of Staff
Groarke, Jack
Legislative Assistant
Haimowitz, Michelle
Special Assistant to the Chief of Staff
Hannon, Kyle
Regional Manager
Hartman, Doug
Legislative Correspondent
Hermsen, Liz
Senior Policy Advisor
Hill, Joseph
Legislative Fellow
Imhof, Kurt
Regional Representative
Love, Jaren
Constituent Advocate
Mabry, Sara
Legislative Assistant
Mellody, April
Deputy Chief of Staff for Communications
Miller, Alexandra
Deputy Press Secretary
Miller, Derek
Legislative Director
Mueller, Gillian
Senior Policy Advisor
Obando-Derstine, Carol
Latino Affairs Advisor; Regional Manager
Rizzo, John
Communications Director
Rojas, Pablo
Legislative Correspondent
Seaman, Bonnie
Director of Constituent Services
Sheehan, Emily
Constituent Advocate
Solomon, Jared
Legislative Assistant
Toth, Amanda
Constituent Advocate
Vachon, Barbara
Executive Assistant
Webster, Kichelle
Legislative Correspondent
Wells, Adam
Systems Administrator; New Media Director
Williams, Ed
State Director, Senior Counsel
Wells, Adam
Systems Administrator; New Media Director
Hermsen, Liz
Senior Policy Advisor
Mueller, Gillian
Senior Policy Advisor
Obando-Derstine, Carol
Latino Affairs Advisor; Regional Manager
Beecher, Dianne
Senior Constituent Advocate
Gall, Alexa
Constituent Advocate
Garcia, Sandra
Constituent Advocate
Love, Jaren
Constituent Advocate
Sheehan, Emily
Constituent Advocate
Toth, Amanda
Constituent Advocate
Brown, James
Chief of Staff
Haimowitz, Michelle
Special Assistant to the Chief of Staff
Mellody, April
Deputy Chief of Staff for Communications
Rizzo, John
Communications Director
Gentile, Kristen
Deputy Chief of Staff
Dennis, Teresa
Deputy Director of Constituent Services
Miller, Alexandra
Deputy Press Secretary
Bullock, Cheryl
Southeast Regional Director
Erickson, Jackie
Southwest Regional Director
Seaman, Bonnie
Director of Constituent Services
Wells, Adam
Systems Administrator; New Media Director
Williams, Ed
State Director, Senior Counsel
Vachon, Barbara
Executive Assistant
Hill, Joseph
Legislative Fellow
Gearen, Caitlin
Legislative Assistant
Groarke, Jack
Legislative Assistant
Mabry, Sara
Legislative Assistant
Solomon, Jared
Legislative Assistant
Borzner, Claire
Legislative Correspondent
Hartman, Doug
Legislative Correspondent
Rojas, Pablo
Legislative Correspondent
Webster, Kichelle
Legislative Correspondent
Miller, Derek
Legislative Director
Bierly, Kim
Regional Manager
Hannon, Kyle
Regional Manager
Obando-Derstine, Carol
Latino Affairs Advisor; Regional Manager
Ball, Jordan
Regional Representative
Ferruchie, Jim
Regional Representative
Imhof, Kurt
Regional Representative
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Robert Casey Jr. Committees
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Robert Casey Jr. Biography
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  • Elected: 2006, term expires 2018, 2nd term.
  • State: Pennsylvania
  • Born: Apr. 13, 1960, Scranton
  • Home: Scranton
  • Education:

    Col. of the Holy Cross, B.A. 1982, Catholic U., J.D. 1988

  • Professional Career:

    Practicing atty., 1988-96.

  • Political Career:

    PA aud. gen., 1996-2004; PA st. treas., 2004-06.

  • Ethnicity: White/Caucasian
  • Religion:

    Catholic

  • Family: Married (Terese); 4 children

Robert Casey Jr., a Democrat elected in 2006, is the senior senator from Pennsylvania. With the defeat of his colleague, Arlen Specter, in 2010, he is his state’s most powerful Democrat. Yet Casey got quite a scare from a well-funded but largely unknown Republican challenger in 2012. Read More

Robert Casey Jr., a Democrat elected in 2006, is the senior senator from Pennsylvania. With the defeat of his colleague, Arlen Specter, in 2010, he is his state’s most powerful Democrat. Yet Casey got quite a scare from a well-funded but largely unknown Republican challenger in 2012.

Casey was born in the former coal town of Scranton, the oldest son in a large Irish-Catholic political family. He grew up in the Green Ridge neighborhood, the same area of town as the city’s other famous politician, Vice President Joe Biden, though Biden moved away two years before Casey’s birth. Casey’s father, Robert Casey, lost in three Democratic primaries before winning the first of his two terms as governor in 1986. He was a feisty, tradition-minded practitioner of New Deal-style politics, known best nationally as a steadfast opponent of abortion rights. In 1992, he was prevented from speaking at the Democratic National Convention, a decision related to his stance on abortion but also brought on by his skepticism about Bill Clinton as the right candidate.

Like his father, Robert Jr. graduated from the College of the Holy Cross in Massachusetts. He taught in an inner-city Philadelphia school for the Jesuit Volunteer Corps and got his law degree from Catholic University in Washington, D.C. He practiced law in Scranton, and then won election as state auditor general in 1996. He was reelected in 2000. Two years later, running as a cultural conservative with strong labor support, he lost a bitter and expensive primary for governor to former Philadelphia Mayor Ed Rendell. Casey’s tightly scripted campaign and negative ads tarnished his image, but he showed resilience by returning two years later to win the state treasurer’s office.

In 2005, national Democrats were looking for a strong challenger to Republican Sen. Rick Santorum, a high-profile social conservative with a red-state following and a blue-state constituency. First in the House and then in the Senate, Santorum showed a knack for winning elections against tough odds. But the state’s political landscape had shifted considerably since his first election to the Senate in 1994. Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee Chairman Charles Schumer of New York wanted Casey to run and quickly cleared the field to avoid a cash-draining primary. There was one problem: Casey’s opposition to abortion rights, which made him anathema to many cultural liberals in the Philadelphia area. But Schumer believed that Casey could make inroads into Santorum’s culturally conservative and “pro-life” base, and, as the Democratic alternative to Santorum, would be acceptable to “pro-choice” voters in suburban Philadelphia. The national party’s heavy-handed involvement rankled many Democrats, but resistance to Casey’s candidacy faded in the run-up to the election as he maintained a steady and sizable lead over Santorum in the polls.

Though Santorum was being mentioned as a potential presidential candidate, his standing at home was tenuous. As early as April 2005, he trailed Casey by double digits in the polls. That summer, he released a book titled, It Takes a Family: Conservatism and the Common Good. The year before he stood for reelection was perhaps not the best timing for a frank discourse on some of the most divisive cultural issues of the day. Despite his stature as a member of the Senate Republican leadership, his avid support for the increasingly unpopular Bush administration was unhelpful in 2006. Casey hammered him for voting “98 percent of the time” with President George W. Bush and characterized Santorum as having close ties to the oil, pharmaceutical, and insurance industries. Democrats sought mileage from the issue of Santorum’s residence—an issue Santorum had used against his opponent in his first House campaign in 1990—and questioned whether his Virginia home disqualified him from casting a vote in Penn Hills, the Pittsburgh suburb where Santorum owned a home and was registered to vote. Democrats also criticized him for using Penn Hills school district taxpayer dollars to educate his children in a Pennsylvania-based online charter school though they spent much of their time in Virginia.

Santorum, who trailed in the polls from beginning to end, campaigned aggressively across the state while Casey limited his public appearances in the early stages of the campaign. The two candidates clashed over the war in Iraq, Social Security, and immigration. Casey’s socially conservative positions—at the time, he opposed gun control and same-sex marriage—helped cut into Santorum’s advantage outside the state’s metropolitan areas. Together the two candidates raised $43 million, and Santorum outspent Casey by more than $8 million, but it wasn’t enough. Casey won 59%-41%, to become the first Pennsylvania Democrat elected to a full Senate term since Joe Clark in 1962. He won by huge margins in Pittsburgh’s Allegheny County, 65%-35%, and in Philadelphia, 84%-16%, while holding his own in the Republican “T” that stretches from Pennsylvania Dutch country around Lancaster to the northern tier of sparsely populated counties along the New York border. Casey also swept the populous Philadelphia suburbs, winning 62% in Delaware and Montgomery counties, 59% in Bucks County, and 55% in Chester County.

In the Senate, Casey is a reliable supporter of his party’s agenda, though his devout Catholicism and his social conservatism occasionally cause him to break ranks. He has voted with President Barack Obama on most major issues. Casey sponsored a bill in March 2011 letting the federal government regulate the controversial natural gas drilling technique known as hydraulic fracturing or “hydro fracking,” which environmentalists blame for contaminating groundwater in Pennsylvania and elsewhere. He angered some anti-abortion groups in April 2011 when he voted against denying federal funds to Planned Parenthood, saying the group provides many family planning services beyond abortion.

Two of Casey’s causes have been agriculture and expanding access to child care. After milk prices collapsed in 2009, he joined Specter in introducing legislation to change the amount farmers are paid for milk. Also that year, he introduced a bill to award grants to states that provide high-quality, full-day pre-kindergarten programs. He also was an avid booster of funding for the State Children’s Health Insurance Program, similar to a program his father instituted in Pennsylvania in 1992.

From his seat on the Foreign Relations Committee, Casey was strongly critical of Afghanistan leader Hamid Karzai, whom he blamed in 2009 for lacking urgency in rooting out corruption. He also pushed Pakistani President Asif Ali Zardari in November 2010 to improve customs enforcement at border crossings after news reports that caravans of Pakistani trucks carrying bomb-making materials were crossing into Afghanistan through the Khyber Pass. He visited Pakistan in August 2011 and urged government officials to limit exports of chemicals used to make improvised explosive devices (IEDs), which have killed a number of U.S. soldiers in Afghanistan.

Casey voted against South Korea, Panama, and Colombia trade bills that became law in October 2011. “Our workers are losing over and over again when you have these trade agreements,” Casey told The Morning Call newspaper of Allentown. Casey did get signed into law his Trade Adjustment Assistance amendment, which provided job training money for workers hurt by outsourcing. Casey also offered a bill in August 2012 to withhold federal funds to call centers that shift jobs overseas. In May 2012, Casey and Schumer introduced a bill to prevent U.S. business executives from giving up their citizenship to evade taxes, singling out Facebook co-founder Eduardo Saverin, who had renounced his citizenship before new taxes kicked in when the social networking company went public. The Schumer-Casey bill became controversial, with The Wall Street Journal condemning it and anti-tax activist Grover Norquist claiming similar legislation “existed in Germany in the 1930s.” Saverin, who moved to Singapore, claimed he still paid hundreds of millions in U.S. taxes.

On issues of strong local interest, Casey opposed the building of high-voltage transmission lines from the Appalachian mountain chain to the East Coast as “federal government arrogance” and in October 2007, threatened to block the reconfirmation of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission chairman. The Department of Energy had classified 52 of Pennsylvania’s 67 counties as a “national interest electric transmission corridor.” Casey joined Sen. Pat Toomey, R-Pa. and Rep. Glenn Thompson, R-Pa. in nominating Pennsylvania State football coach Joe Paterno for a Presidential Medal of Freedom in September 2011. But after child sex abuse allegations against a former defensive coordinator rocked the school two months later, Paterno was fired, and the Pennsylvania lawmakers withdrew the nomination.

Republicans hoped to unseat Casey in 2012, but they had a hard time recruiting a top-tier candidate to take on the well-funded incumbent. None of their primary candidates had significant name recognition. They included former state Rep. Sam Rohrer, businessman Steve Welch, lawyer Marc Scaringi, and former coal company executive Tom Smith. Welch got support from Gov. Tom Corbett, R-Pa., but it was not enough to stave off Smith, who spent almost $5 million of his own money and won the nomination with 39.5% of the vote.

A virtual unknown, Smith was given little chance to beat Casey. As a precaution, Casey kept his distance from President Barack Obama, and in late November 2011, failed to attend a speech Obama gave in Scranton. Casey’s office said the senator had to be in Washington for floor votes. A June 2012 Quinnipiac poll showed Casey with a comfortable lead, 51%-32%.

Smith went on the attack, calling Casey “Senator Zero” and claiming he had accomplished little in the Senate. And Casey’s supporters worried that he was underestimating Smith. “They’ve run a non-campaign up until now,” former Gov. Rendell, D-Pa. told The Times-Tribune of Scranton in October. Around that time, Smith personally invested $10 million into his campaign, flooding the airwaves with attack ads. Despite his tea party support, Smith characterized himself as a former “union coal miner with big dreams,” and in the campaign’s only debate, he portrayed Casey as tight with the Obama administration. To demonstrate his independence, Casey highlighted his opposition to the Obama-sponsored trade deals. Still, a Quinnipiac poll in October found Casey’s lead had narrowed to 48%-45%.

Casey won endorsements from most of the state’s major newspapers, including the conservative Pittsburgh Tribune-Review. Smith outspent him, $21 million to $14 million, but Casey hung on to win, 54%-45%. He ran only slightly ahead of Obama, who won Pennsylvania with 52% of the vote.

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Robert Casey Jr. Election Results
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2012 General
Bob Casey (D)
Votes: 3,021,364
Percent: 53.69%
Tom Smith (R)
Votes: 2,509,132
Percent: 44.59%
2012 Primary
Bob Casey (D)
Votes: 565,488
Percent: 80.88%
Joseph Vodvarka (D)
Votes: 133,683
Percent: 19.12%
Prior Winning Percentages
2006 (59%)
Robert Casey Jr. Votes and Bills
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National Journal’s rating system is an objective method of analyzing voting. The liberal score means that the lawmaker’s votes were more liberal than that percentage of his colleagues’ votes. The conservative score means his votes were more conservative than that percentage of his colleagues’ votes. The composite score is an average of a lawmaker’s six issue-based scores. See all NJ Voting

More Liberal
More Conservative
2013 2012 2011
Economic 59 (L) : 39 (C) 58 (L) : 37 (C) 80 (L) : 19 (C)
Social 62 (L) : 37 (C) 55 (L) : 43 (C) 52 (L) : - (C)
Foreign 58 (L) : 36 (C) 68 (L) : 19 (C) 62 (L) : 35 (C)
Composite 61.2 (L) : 38.8 (C) 63.7 (L) : 36.3 (C) 73.3 (L) : 26.7 (C)
Interest Group Ratings

The vote ratings by 10 special interest groups provide insight into a lawmaker’s general ideology and the degree to which he or she agrees with the group’s point of view. Two organizations provide just one combined rating for 2011 and 2012, the two sessions of the 112th Congress. They are the ACLU and the ITIC. About the interest groups.

20112012
FRC1414
LCV9179
CFG017
ITIC-63
NTU614
20112012
COC45-
ACLU-100
ACU012
ADA9585
AFSCME100-
Key Senate Votes

The key votes show how a member of Congress voted on the major bills of the year. N indicates a "no" vote; Y a "yes" vote. If a member voted "present" or was absent, the bill caption is not shown. For a complete description of the bills included in key votes, see the Almanac's Guide to Usage.

    • End fiscal cliff
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Block faith exemptions
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2012
    • Approve gas pipeline
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Approve farm bill
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Let cyber bill proceed
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2012
    • Block Gitmo transfers
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2012
    • Raise debt limit
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Pass balanced budget amendment
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2011
    • Stop EPA climate regulations
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2011
    • Proceed to Cordray vote
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Require talking filibuster
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2011
    • Limit Fannie/Freddie
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2011
    • Regulate financial firms
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2010
    • Pass tax cuts for some
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2010
    • Legalize immigrants' kids
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2010
    • Ratify New START
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2010
    • Confirm Elena Kagan
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2010
    • Stop EPA climate regs
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2010
    • Repeal don't ask, tell
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2010
    • Overturn Ledbetter
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Block release of TARP funds
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2009
    • Pass $787 billion stimulus
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Repeal DC gun laws
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Confirm Sonia Sotomayor
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Pass health care bill
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Bar budget rules for climate bill
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Pass 2010 budget resolution
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Let judges adjust mortgages
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Allow FDA to regulate tobacco
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Protect gays from hate crimes
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Cut F-22 funds
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Label North Korea terrorist state
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2009
    • Build Guantanamo replacement
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2009
    • Allow federal funds for abortion
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2009
    • Cap greenhouse gases
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2008
    • Bail out financial markets
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2008
    • Increase missile defense $
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2008
    • Overhaul FISA
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2008
    • Raise CAFE standards
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2007
    • Expand SCHIP
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2007
    • Make English official language
    • Vote: N
    • Year: 2007
    • Path to citizenship
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2007
    • Fetus is unborn child
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2007
    • Prosecute hate crimes
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2007
    • Withdraw troops 3/08
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2007
    • Iran guard is terrorist group
    • Vote: Y
    • Year: 2007
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The Almanac is a members-only database of searchable profiles compiled and adapted from the Almanac of American Politics. Comprehensive online profiles include biographical and political summaries of elected officials, campaign expenditures, voting records, interest-group ratings, and congressional staff look-ups. In-depth overviews of each state and house district are included as well, along with demographic data, analysis of voting trends, and political histories.
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